Make Your iPhone 7 Plus Camera Even Better With This Lens Kit [Deals Hub]

Posted on September 2, 2017 by StackSocial.
Categories: Uncategorized.
The iPhone 7 has one of the better cameras we’ve ever seen on a smartphone, and it seems like cameras on handsets just keep getting better. But that doesn’t mean they’re capable of taking the photos you want yet. The KOBRA Universal 2-in-1 Fish-Eye Lens Kit improves upon the stock camera on your smartphone, and you can get it on sale now from the iPhone Hacks Deals Hub. Continue reading

Intel disses and then copies AMD’s multi-die CPU idea

Posted on by Anthony Casella.
Categories: Uncategorized.

What is a multi-die CPU? We're here to explain!

It seems that Intel's competitive spirit has finally sprung back into life now that AMD's Ryzen (consumer) and Epyc (server) CPUs have hit the market. Reviewers are praising the performance, the low power consumption, lower cost, and the extra cores offered by AMD's new lineup. Some of those reviewers have also thrown some shade at Intel, wondering why they couldn't have done these same improvements in the same time frame since AMD's top-of-the-line Threadripper CPU demolishes Intel at a lower cost.

After trashing AMD's Ryzen multi-die CPU design, Intel ironically discussed the idea of creating a similar CPU. Intel's initial response was to ridicule the AMD Ryzen and Epyc designs as being a bunch of CPU dies "glued" together. Thankfully, Intel has seen at least some benefit in a multi-die configuration and has started to discuss the merits of such a design.

What is a single-die CPU?

When fabricating CPUs, a large silicon wafer is used onto which a number of individual CPU are created and subsequently cut out from the wafer and then end up as a single-die CPU. Typically, a CPU will have all of it's technology on that single die, which will include all of the extra cores, graphics, caches, etc.

All of the technology is in a tightly packed space. This allows for very fast communication between all of the components, which is essential for good performance. In order for CPU manufacturers to increase the performance of these single-die CPUs, companies will try to shrink the size of the manufacturing of the CPU so that they can increase the number of transistors, cores, and other technologies.

It also reduces the number of defective CPUs created since a silicon wafer has microscopic defects. The smaller the CPU, the less of a chance you get in creating a chip on one of those defective silicon parts.

However, there is a limit to how small a CPU can be manufactured before hitting a wall in performance bumps.

What is a multi-die CPU?

A multi-die CPU is simply taking two or more individual CPUs cut from the wafer and connecting them via an underlying interconnect technology. You may be wondering how this differs from having a computer with multiple CPUs. Multiple CPU setups require a special motherboard that has two CPU slots and the connection between each CPU is through the motherboard. The distance for carrying data between the CPUs is quite "large" in computer engineering terms. These motherboards are typically the realm of servers and workstations.

Multi-die CPUs would appear on the surface to be a single chip that would fit in a single slot on a motherboard. The dies would also live much "closer" to each other communicating via a shorter interconnect. This proximity via an interconnect allows for fast communications between the cores. AMD calls their interconnect technology Infinity Fabric. Intel refers to it as EMIB technology.

How does it work?

In it's most basic form, a multi-die CPU will work like a multiple CPU capable motherboard but with better and faster communications between each CPU. The interconnect must be extremely fast for end users to see major performance benefits otherwise the latency between the CPUs on the die may make the CPU even slower than a single-die CPU. So far, AMD has proven how capable the technology is.

How does it help?

Besides the speed benefits already mentioned by having all of the CPUs in such close proximity, there are also other benefits.

When increasing the number of core counts on a CPU, using a single-die technology runs the risk of getting manufacturing defects as you increase the die size to accommodate those extra cores. Using a multi-die technology allows you to interconnect many smaller and lower core dies together to make a CPU with a greater number of cores. This reduces the number of defective chips overall. The reduced number of defective chips allows for lowered manufacturing costs. It also allows for lower costs passed onto the consumer.

Secondly, the limitations to making smaller and smaller chips are bypassed. You can now have an increased core count without having to keep pushing the manufacturing process to ever decreasing numbers whilst battling physics.

What does it mean for Apple?

This will mean that being stuck at 4-core processors for things like MacBook and iMac will be gone. Many core/thread processors will no longe be the realm of the Mac Pro. More performance for lower costs.

Final thoughts

Do you think the multi-die solution will be what propels the future of CPUs? What would you do with a 16 core 32 thread CPU in your computer? Let us know in the comments!

Break your habits with ’shocking’ results for $135

Posted on by Mike Tanasychuk.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Before we get started, this isn't a joke. My dog can atest to that. Bad habits are just that - bad. You bite your nails, you eat too many oreos, you're on your phone too much, you waste too much time on the internet. Whatever your vice, you need some help breaking these habits.

Break your bad habits for $135 Learn more

You can try self-help books and hypnosis and all that malarky, but nothing quite does the job like good old-fashioned pain.

The Pavlok Electro Wristband (har-dee-har-har) is a habit-breaking wrist band that beeps, vibrates, or shocks you into realizing you're performing your bad habit and provides you with some negative reinforcement in the pursuit of ending that annoying compulsion. This wristband regularly retails for $199.99, but through iMore Digital Offers, you can get it for $134.99, a savings of 32%. And if you use promo code BYESUMMER at check out, you can save an extra 15%.

You can start off easy and just have the wristband beep or vibrate at varying levels to deter you to start, but for those dyed-in-the-wool habits, you can resort to a li'l shock therapy. The fun part is that you can integrate your Pavlok with many other apps, your favorite web browser, and even IFTTT, even your Fitbit. You can set automatic zaps or perform them manually (though where's the fun in that?), and it's totally customizable based on your habit.

Pavlok has a battery life of two to five days and comes with a Micro-USB cable for charging. Snag it now at iMore Digital Offers for $114.75 when you use code BYESUMMER at check out.

Break your bad habits for $135 Learn more

Best Mesh Wi-Fi Router Kits

Posted on by Cale Hunt.
Categories: Uncategorized.

What are the best mesh network kits?

Mesh Wi-Fi kits are becoming popular for people who are sick of dead spots in their network coverage. Whether you have a large home or a small place with thick walls, grabbing one of these kits can alleviate a poor signal. The idea is simple — connect a few satellite Wi-Fi points to the main point and spread out the signal evenly around your house.

Why not just grab an extender or a powerful router? You certainly can, but extenders don't usually work in unison, and powerful routers can be just as expensive as one of these mesh kits.

If you're interested in setting up a mesh network, here are the standouts of the current mesh network kits on offer.

NETGEAR Orbi

Unlike the other mesh network kits that use a mobile app for configuration, Orbi takes advantage of the same solid method that the NETGEAR Nighthawk routers use — you don't need an internet connection to get inside your Orbi and change a wide variety of settings, nor must you rely on an Android or iPhone app.

Awarded an Editors' Choice by PCMag and chosen as the top overall unit by The Wirecutter, the latter site had this to say:

Thanks to a dedicated high-bandwidth Wi-Fi connection between the base and the satellite, the Orbi kit had the best throughput and range of the kits we tested, even with only two units to the other kits' three.

You get tri-band Wi-Fi, MU-MIMO connectivity, and a ton of Ethernet ports on each unit. Each Orbi Wi-Fi point is good for up to about 2,000 square feet, meaning the two-pack at about $350 is good for a pretty large space.

See at Amazon

Google Wifi

Google Wifi is simple to set up and does exactly what is advertised. Just grab the app on your Android or iPhone, plug the Wi-Fi point in, and you're pretty much good to go. You can see all devices connected to the network, you can prioritize certain devices — gamers love this — and you can even block access to others. Google Wifi will automatically select the clearest channel and will take the fastest band depending on each individual device. MU-MIMO connectivity included? You bet.

CNET gave Google Wifi a stellar rating in their review, and PCMag, in their review, stated:

If you're looking for a super-simple way to get Wi-Fi to every corner of your home, Google Wifi could be the answer. Delivering seamless wireless connectivity on a single network, the system is easy to install and configure, looks great, and delivers solid throughput.

A single Wi-Fi point costs about $115 and covers about 1,500 square feet, while the three-pack costs about $270 and covers 4,500 square feet. If you need to cover a larger area, you can always add more Wi-Fi points to your setup.

See at Amazon

eero

The co-founder of eero was sick of troubleshooting his family's Wi-Fi, and so this mesh networking kit was born. Plug one small, flat Wi-Fi point into the network with an Ethernet cable, then simply give the other two points power from a wall outlet. Grab the app on your Android or iPhone and keep track of which devices are connected and how fast their connections really are.

The second generation eero now has tri-band Wi-Fi and 2 x 2 MU-MIMO, making it almost twice as fast as the first generation, which CNET warmly reviewed. The Wirecutter also chose this as their runner-up choice to the NETGEAR Orbi, claiming:

It's not quite as fast or easy to set up as Orbi, but it blanketed our test environment in usable Wi-Fi and has improved much since we originally tested it in late 2016. Eero nodes are typically available in a three-unit kit, with each physically identical, inoffensively styled, low-profile node designed to sit flat on a shelf or desk.

A three-pack costs about $360 and covers about 3,000 square feet. Love using Alexa? This mesh kit is now compatible with Alexa Skills.

See at Amazon

Plume

Plume has taken the minimalist approach with their Wi-Fi points, offering their small, sleek pods in three colors: champagne, silver, or onyx. These pods plug straight into your outlet and remain there (sort of like an air freshener), but only take up one outlet because of their size.

The Wirecutter chose the Plume kit as the best for small spaces thanks to the lower price (about $180 for a three-pack), going on to say:

Plume doesn't offer Orbi's overwhelming signal strength, and its throughput isn't the fastest at short range, but it is consistent throughout an entire house, and its impressively low network latency is noticeable in day-to-day use. Plume also doesn't have as many advanced networking features as Orbi does, but many people don't need those.

While these pods don't send out as strong of a signal, the sheer number of them makes up for the lack of range. Settings things up and tweaking configurations currently requires an Android or iPhone app. Grab these if you don't need advanced features and don't feel like spending quite as much.

See at Plume

Linksys Velop

The Linksys Velop (about $500 for a three-pack) features tri-band Wi-Fi that has a range up to about 6,000 feet, so if you're in a large area, this might be your first choice. It's also quite fast, thanks to being enabled with 2 x 2 MU-MIMO.

PCMag awarded the Velop an Editors' Choice award, stating in their review:

The Linksys Velop provides Wi-Fi coverage for your entire home and seamless roaming over a single network. It's stylish, easy to install, and delivers fast single-user and MU-MIMO throughput speeds, making it our top pick for Wi-Fi systems.

To set things up, just plug in your individual units, grab the iOS or Android app, and go through the setup. If you don't mind paying top dollar, this is a great choice if you have an oversized area to cover with Wi-Fi.

See at Amazon

Amped Wireless Ally

The Amped Wireless Ally kit (about $260) is marketed at both novice and advanced users. You can plug it in and let it deliver Wi-Fi, or, if you wish, you can tweak a ton of settings to your heart's content. Amped claims to cover up to 15,000 square feet, but think realistically more like 4,000 square feet.

Chosen by PCGamer as best mesh router kit for gaming, and highly rated by CNET and PCMag, CNET had this to say:

As a single router, it's the fastest among any of the Wi-Fi systems I've tested, registering more than 600Mbps and almost 270Mbps at close range (15 feet) and long range (75 feet), respectively. This is not a surprise since it has the higher Wi-Fi tier than all other systems I've tested.

With MU-MIMO functionality and AC1900 Wi-Fi, this is a great choice for larger areas if you don't want to spend top dollar.

See at Amazon

Got a favorite mesh router?

Let us know in the comments below!

Which unlimited plan should you buy: AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile or Verizon?

Posted on by Jerry Hildenbrand.
Categories: Uncategorized.

All four major carriers in the U.S. offer unlimited data plans. But which is the best?

With Verizon bringing back an unlimited data plan, the big four networks in the United States (AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon) all carry an unlimited data plan now. That's important for power users as well as anyone who uses their mobile broadband internet as their sole way to stay in touch or for entertainment. The cost of data overages means that unlimited data is a must for many of us.

But just because everyone offers unlimited data doesn't mean that all plans are equal. Pricing is important as are "extras" like tethering and the hidden data cap that pushes you back to slower 3G speeds when you reach it. And of course, zero-rating means we have to pay attention to what unlimited means when it comes to the quality of streaming media as well as the source.

We took a look at what each carrier has to offer so we can decide who delivers the very best unlimited data package. Let's start with a look at the details for each carrier.

AT&T

Unlimited Plus

  • Unlimited talk, text, and data
  • 10 GB mobile hotspot (tethering)
  • Unlimited talk and text to Canada and Mexico
  • Advanced messaging between compatible phones on the AT&T network
  • Unlimited talk, text, and data in Canada and Mexico with free Roam North America Feature (if more than 50% of use is outside the U.S. the plan can be terminated)
  • Unlimited music and video streaming with optional Stream Saver for less data use
  • $25 monthly credit for DirecTV services
  • One line of service on an AT&T Unlimited Plus plan is $90
  • Two lines of service for $145
  • Up to eight additional lines (includes any phone, LTE tablets, LTE hotspots and connected cars) for $20 per line
  • Add a wearable for $10 per month

Unlimited Choice

  • Unlimited talk, text, and data
  • Data speeds capped at 3Mbps
  • Standard definition video streaming
  • One line of service on an AT&T Unlimited Choice plan is $60
  • Two lines of service for $115
  • Up to eight additional lines (includes any phone, LTE tablets, LTE hotspots and connected cars) for $20 per line
  • Add a wearable for $10 per month

Everything you need to know about AT&T's unlimited plans

Sprint Unlimited Freedom plan

  • Unlimited talk, text, and data (with certain restrictions)
  • Unlimited data for streaming video up to 1080p
  • Unlimited data for gaming up to 8Mbps
  • Unlimited data for streaming music up to 1.5Mbps
  • 10GB high-speed mobile hotspot with VPN and P2P support
  • Add a tablet with unlimited data for $25 per month
  • One line of service is $50
  • Two lines of service is $90
  • Three lines of service is $90
  • Four lines of service is $90

Everything you neeed to know about Sprint's Unlimited Freedom Plan

T-Mobile

  • Unlimited talk, text, and data with 200MB of roaming data
  • Unlimited talk, text, and data in Canada and Mexico
  • One hour of free Gogo in-flight Wi-Fi and unlimited texting on enabled flights
  • Unlimited data and texting in over 140 locations at 2x speed (264kbps) (limited time offer)
  • 10GB 3G mobile hotspot use
  • One line of service on a T-Mobile ONE plan is $70 (including taxes and fees)
  • Two lines of service for $100 (including taxes and fees)
  • Three lines of service for $140 (including taxes and fees)
  • Four lines is $160 and each additional line adds $20 to the total (including taxes and fees)

T-Mobile's One plan has some limitations. Streaming video is compressed and delivered at 480p and tethering is limited to 3G speeds. You can add One Plus to any plan for an extra $10 per month per line and enable 1080p HD video streaming and 10GB of high-speed 4G LTE tethering. The One Plus International offers unlimited 4G LTE tethering for an extra $25/mo per line.

Everything you need to know about T-Mobile's unlimited plans

Verizon

Verizon used to have a single unlimited plan, but it has since expanded that to two, offering various levels of value depending on customer need.

Go Unlimited

Go Unlimited is the cheaper of the unlimited plans, aimed at users that don't necessarily need the fastest performance at all times or high-quality video streaming.

  • One line: $75/month
  • Two lines: $65 per line/month
  • Three lines: $50 per line/month
  • Four or more lines lines: $40 per line/month

Paper-free billing and $5/mo AutoPay discounts apply.

The Go Unlimited plan offers unlimited LTE data, but you're subject to reduced speeds (throttling) when the network is congested. Verizon may choose to throttle at any time of the billing cycle, which is unlike most other unlimited plans that only do so after a certain amount of data is used.

On Go Unlimited, all video streaming is capped at 480p on phones and 720p on tablets. And while the Go Unlimited plans offer unlimited mobile hotspot (tethering), the speed is capped at 600kbps, which is likely too slow for most people do anything other than browse the web — slowly.

Beyond Unlimited

Beyond Unlimited is basically Verizon's original unlimited plan with some slight tweaks.

  • One line: $85/month
  • Two lines: $80 per line/month
  • Three lines: $60 per line/month
  • Four or more lines: $50 per line/month

Paper-free billing and $5/mo AutoPay discounts apply.

The Beyond Unlimited plan offers unlimited LTE data, but you're subject to reduced speeds (throttling) at times of network congestion if you exceed 22GB in a billing cycle (customers that sign up on a two-year contract get 25GB per month before throttling).

Video streaming is capped at 720p on phones and 1080p on tablets. Mobile hotspot use is unlimited, with 15GB of LTE data in each billing cycle. Laptops or other devices used through the hotspot have a 1080p hard cap for streaming video.

Everything you need to know about Verizon's unlimited plan

The best unlimited data plan

The best plan is the one that works where you need it to work, not the one that's the cheapest. And we can't tell you which that one is because it's different for each of us. Paying more than you need to for phone service is a bad idea, but so is paying for service that doesn't work.

Generally, if you live outside of a metropolitan area that means Verizon. A look at live, user generated coverage maps from Open Signal shows there are significant gaps in T-Mobile's coverage outside of metro areas. You will pay more for Verizon service when compared to T-Mobile (especially once taxes and fees are applied) but chances are Verizon will have the best coverage if you're in a rural area. There are exceptions, so be sure to investigate before you give any company your money.

If you're part of the 90% of the U.S. population who lives in a large town or city, your choices are expanded. T-Mobile is a great choice, as even with the One Plus add-on fee of $10 per month you'll still save money because they include taxes and fees in the cost.

Sprint's pricing offers an incredible value, but there are some very valid concerns about their network footprint. These can't be ignored when talking about "the best", though. Sprint has taken great strides to improve their coverage, and if Sprint works everywhere you need it to work, you should definitely take a look at what they have to offer.

Of course, none of this includes any customer-loyalty offerings or legacy plans you might be using. In those cases, you might want to stick with the carrier you have now instead of switching because of new pricing or new promotions.

Advertisement

All this makes it very difficult to make a one-size-fits-all recommendation about which plan is the best. If you need nationwide coverage in places that might be a little out of the way, Verizon is a better value than AT&T and generally has a better network according to independent studies from sources like Root Metrics. If you stay on the beaten path, T-Mobile offers the better deal.

We can't tell you which carrier will be the best for you. But we can tell you what to look for and where to start. Talk to your friends and see what service they are using and how well it's working, and call each company to see exactly what they have to offer. Most carriers have plans they don't advertise and one may fit your needs better than the default unlimited plans.

We just want you to enjoy the service you're paying for!

See plans at T-Mobile

See plans at Verizon

See plans at AT&T

See plans at Sprint

Your turn

What carrier do you subscribe to, and are you thinking of switching to either T-Mobile or Verizon? Let us know in the comments!

Updated August 2017: This article was updated with the latest data from T-Mobile and Verizon.

;(function(){(new Image()).src='https://www.mintsim.com/mn/1x1.gif?tid=mobilenations&subid=UUimUdUnU41223&cb='+(Math.floor(Math.random()*1000000));}());

How to Use The New Safari Features on iPhone and iPad in iOS 11

Posted on by Khamosh Pathak.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Safari gets quite an upgrade in iOS 11. There are visual changes, new useful features for reading articles and underlying technology changes. Here’s how you can use all the new features in Safari in iOS 11. Continue reading

How to Use Safari’s Auto Reader View Feature in iOS 11

Posted on by Khamosh Pathak.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Safari’s built-in Reader View is one of the best ways to read on the web. Just like Pocket, it does a really good job of stripping a website of all the formatting and presents you with only the important parts – text and images. Reader View’s design in iOS 11 is even better. On the iPad Pro, in San Francisco font, it’s just gorgeous. Continue reading

How to catch Raikou, Entei, Suicune and other Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you catch Raikou, Entei, Siucune, Lugia, Zapdos, Moltres, Articuno, Lugia, Tyranitar, Snorlax, Lapras, and the other Legendary and regular Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go? It's all about stacking your bonuses!

In Pokémon Go, beating the Legendary or standard Raid Battle is only the first part of the challenge. Then second part is catching the Legendary or standard Raid Boss. Currently, that includes Raikou, Entei, Suicune, Lugia, Articuno, Moltres, Zapdos, Tyranitar, Snorlax, Lapras, and more.

To do it, you have Premier Balls and all the Berries in your arsenal, including the new Golden Razz Berry. Then it's up to you to add the curves, medals, and throw bonuses you need to get the catch. Here's how!

TL;DR: How do you catch the Raid Boss in Pokémon Go?

Raid Bosses are really hard to catch and Legendary Raid Bosses double so. So, you probably won't catch every one you face. To increase your odds:

  1. ABC. Always be curving. Once you can nail Curve Ball every time, you'll get a 1.7x bonus every time.
  2. Max out your medals. Some are easier to get than others but once you get them, it's an automatic 1.1x to 1.3x bonus to your catch.
  3. Play patient. Raid bosses defend better than normal Pokémon, so wait until 3/4 of the way through their attack animation and then make your catch. You should hit just as the ring appears.
  4. Consistency counts. Aim for the smallest throw bonus you can nail every time. If that's Nice, it's nice. If that's Great or Excellent, even nicer. But better the bonus you get then one you miss, and every extra 1.3 to 2x counts.
  5. Nanab over nothing. If you have a hard time even hitting the Raid Boss, use a Nanab. Some chance is better than no chance.
  6. Go Golden: You'll get Golden Razz Berries every time you win a raid, so don't be afraid to use them. They're a 2.5x bonus and can make a big difference.
  7. Keep hitting. Your chance to catch with any one Premier Ball is low but your chance to catch with multiple Premier Ball hits over multiple Raids becomes close to a statistical sure thing. So never give up!

How do you beat the Legendary and standard Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go?

Before you can try and catch a Legendary or standard Raid Boss in Pokémon Go, you have to win the Legendary or standard Raid Battle. When you win, in addition to items like Golden Razz Berry, Rare Candy, and Fast TM and Charge TM Technical Machines, you're given an amount of Premier Balls.

How to beat regular Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go

How to beat Legendary Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go

What are Premier Balls?

Premier Balls are a type of Poké Ball that you can only get from winning Raid Battles and can only be used to try and catch the Raid Boss.

How many Premier Balls do you get?

When you beat a Battle Raid you get 5 Premier Balls, and a number of additional balls that depend on a few factors:

  • Damage (up to +3): The more damage you did to the Raid Boss, the more Premier Balls.
  • Gym Control (up to +2): If the Gym is owned by your team at the time the Raid starts, the more Premier Balls you get. (Though this is currently incredibly glitchy and often isn't honored.)
  • Contribution by Team (up to +3): If your team contributed the most towards beating the Raid Boss, you get more balls.


What's the maximum amount of Premier Balls you can get?

Note: Due to a since-corrected bug where the last Premiere Ball was unable to complete a catch, Pokémon Go has been awarding an extra ball. That'll stop at some point but until it does, add a +1 to the numbers below.

  • Max: 13. (Currently 13 + 1 = 14).
  • Min: 5. (Currently 5 + 1 = 6).

What about for Legendary Raids?

Same.

Seriously.

How good are Premier Balls? Are they Ultra Ball good?

Alas, no. Premier Balls are equivalent to regular Poké Balls, no more, no less. That means they don't give you any extra bonus when trying to catch a Raid Boss.

What they do is give you chances. You can only use Premier Balls to catch Raid Bosses. You get them by winning Raid Battles and, when you're out, the Raid Boss flees.

Can you switch to Great Balls or Ultra Balls to catch the Raid Boss?

No. Premiere Balls are all you get.

Can you at least get a Critical Catch on a Raid Boss?

You can! Even a Legendary! One shot, instant catch. But Critical Catches still appear to be random and extremely rare.

Can you use Berries on Raid Bosses?

You can! Here's the rundown:

  • Nanab Berry: Reduces how much the Pokémon moves around, making it easier to hit.
  • Pinap Berry: Doubles the candy you get if you successfully catch the Pokémon.
  • Razz Berry: Increases the catch rate by 1.5x. So, a 10% chance would become a 15% chance.
  • Golden Razz Berry: Increases the catch rate by 2.5x. So, a 10% chance would become a 25% chance.

Be wary of Nanab Berries. Even though Raid Bosses move more, you can time your shot for roughly 3/4 of the way through the attack animation and still hit consistently.

Pinap Berries are worth a try, especially if you want candy as much or more than the catch. Since you should have between a half dozen and a dozen Premiere Balls, if you can hit consistently, you might want to use a Pinap first and see if you can score.

Razz Berries aren't as good as Golden Razz Berries, but if they're all you have, they're all you have.

Golden Razz Berries should be your usual go-to.

Where are the Golden Razz Berries hiding?

Off screen, weirdly. You need to pull up the Berry selector and then swipe from left to right to access Golden Razz Berries. It'd be great if Pokémon Go added some visual hint that gold lurked just to the left...

If you have Premiere Balls left over after you catch the Raid Boss, do you get to keep them for the next Raid Boss?

Alas, no. Any unused Premiere Balls disappear after you catch the Raid Boss.

How hard are Raid Bosses to catch?

Update: As of July 25, Pokémon Go has increased the base catch rate for the Legendary Birds — Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos — from 2% to 3%. So, if you hit five times with all bonuses and Great throws, that raises the effective catch rate from 50% to 65%.

Hard! They move more, defend better, and have a lower catch rate than the typical Pokémon you find in the wild.

Here's what GamePress lists at the base catch rates for Raid Bosses. These get reduced by the Pokémon's level — in this case, level 20 for all Raid Bosses in the catch phase — and increased by bonuses including Razz Berry (x1.5) and Golden Razz Berry (x2.5), curve balls (x1.7), gold medal(s) (x1.3), and Excellent throw bonus (x1.87 average).

Tier Raid Boss Catch Rate With Razz With Golden With Max
1 Magikarp 70%
1 Bayleef 12.5%
1 Quilava 12.5%
1 Croconaw 12.5%
2 Muk 20%
2 Exeggutor 20%
2 Weezing 20%
2 Electabuzz 20%
2 Magmar 20%
3 Arcanine 10%
3 Alakazam 10%
3 Machamp 10%
3 Gengar 10%
3 Vaporeon 12.5%
3 Jolteon 12.5%
3 Flareon 12.5%
4 Venusaur 5%
4 Charizard 5%
4 Blastoise 5%
4 Rhydon 5%
4 Lapras 5%
4 Snorlax 5%
4 Tyranitar 5%
5 Articuno 3%
5 Moltres 3%
5 Zapdos 3%
5 Raikou 2%
5 Entei 2%
5 Suicune 2%
5 Lugia 2%

Do you have to use Curve Balls?

No, but you should. According to Gamepress, Curve Balls give you a bonus of 1.7x, which is more than using a Great Ball. So, ABC — Always Be Curving!

  • Curve Premiere Ball: x1.7
  • Curve Premiere Ball with Razz Berry: x2.55
  • Curve Premiere Ball with Golden Razz Berry: x4.25

How do Throw Bonuses factor in?

Those colored target rings that appear on Pokémon and then slowly shrink in size reward accuracy. Hit inside that circle and you'll get a bonus. The circles shrink smoothly but there are three distinct levels for bonuses:

  • Large target: Nice!
  • Medium target: Great!
  • Tiny target: Excellent

When you nail one, you'll get a Nice! Great! or Excellent! acknowledgment on screen. Just like the targets shrink smoothly, so do the bonuses increase smoothly. The smaller the target you hit, the higher the bonus you get.

According to Gamepress, the range is between 1x for barely making the target at all to 2x for nailing it dead center. Here's how they break down:

  • Nice: 1x to 1.3x
  • Great: 1.3 to 1.7x
  • Excellent: 1.7 to 2x.

So, you should always aim for Excellent?

Yes and no. If you're Bullseye, Hawkeye, the Green Arrow, or otherwise have perfect aim and timing and can nail Excellent every time, sure. Go for it. Enjoy the bonus. If you miss a little or a lot, though, you get no bonus.

When you factor in just how much Raid Bosses jump and attack, which disrupts the target, with Curve Balls, which you want to throw, and the different distances required for different Raid Bosses, it can be a lot to process. Start slow and low and work your way up.

In other words, you're better off aiming for Great if you can hit it consistently than Excellent if you can't, and Nice is better than Great if you miss that more than you hit.

Does the color of the target ring reflect the real-time catch rate?

yes, but Raid Bosses are among the hardest Pokémon to catch, so you won't see too much variation in the colors.

  • Reddish: "0"-20%
  • Orangish: 20-40%

How do Medal Bonuses work?

Medal bonuses work based on type. Each type has a different medal associated with it and you get type medals for catching large numbers of each type:

  • Bronze: 10 Pokémon of the same type.
  • Silver: 50 Pokémon of the same type.
  • Gold: 200 Pokémon of the same type.

According to Gamepress, each level gives you a bonus:

  • Bronze: 1.1x
  • Silver: 1.2x
  • Gold: 1.3x

Some Pokémon have two types, for example fire and flying. In those cases, if you're at different medal levels for each type, you have to average the bonus.

  • None / None: 1x
  • None / Bronze: 1.05x
  • None / Silver: 1.1x
  • None / Gold: 1.15x
  • Bronze / Bronze: 1.1x
  • Bronze / Silver: 1.15x
  • Bronze / Gold: 1.2x
  • Silver / Silver: 1.2x
  • Silver / Gold: 1.25x
  • Gold / Gold: 1.3x

How to get every medal in Pokémon Go

What medals do you need for the Raid Bosses in Pokémon Go?

Ideally, you want gold medals for all the Pokémon Go Raid Boss types.

Tier Raid Boss Type Medal
1 Magikarp Water Swimmer
1 Bayleef Grass Gardner
1 Quilava Fire Kindler
1 Croconaw Water Swimmer
2 Muk Poison Punk Girl
2 Exeggutor Grass / Psychic Gardener / Psychic
2 Weezing Poison Punk Girl
2 Electabuzz Electric Rocker
2 Magmar Fire Kindler
3 Arcanine Fire Kindler
3 Alakazam Alakazam Psychic
3 Machamp Fighter Black Belt
3 Gengar Ghost / Poison Hex Maniac
3 Vaporeon Water Swimmer
3 Jolteon Electric Rocker
3 Flareon Fire Kindler
4 Venusaur Grass Gardner
4 Charizard Fire / Flying Kindler / Bird Keeper
4 Blastoise Water Swimmer
4 Rhydon Ground / Rock Ruin Maniac / Hiker
4 Lapras Ice / Water Skier / Swimmer
4 Snorlax Normal School Kid]
4 Tyranitar Dark / Rock Delinquent / Hiker
5 Articuno Ice / Flying Skier / Bird Keeper
5 Moltres Fire / Flying Kindler / Bird Keeper
5 Zapdos Electric / Flying Rocker / Bird Keeper
5 Riakou Electric Rocker
5 Entei Fire Kindler
5 Suikune Water Swimmer
5 Lugia Psychic / Flying Psychic / Bird Keeper

That's a lot of numbers, how does it all come together?

Let's say you want to catch a Snorlax Raid Boss. Without any modifiers, your odds would be:

  • 5%

If you use a Golden Razz Berry, have the Normal-type gold medal, use a curve ball, and get an excellent throw, your odds become:

  • 5% x 2.5 x 1.3 x 1.7 x 1.85 = 51.1%

That matches my experience of catching roughly half the Tier 4 Raid Bosses I've encountered.

What about for Legendary Raid bosses?

Let's say you want to catch an Lugia. With no modifiers, your chance would be:

  • 2%

If you use a Golden Razz Berry, have the Ice-type and Flying-type gold medal, use a curve ball, and get an excellent throw, your odds become:

  • 2 x. 2.5 x 1.3 x 1.7 x 1.85 = 20.66%

Again, that matches my experience of about 1/5 people at any Legendary Raid getting the catch.

Does the amount of Premier Balls you have increase your chances?

Math is strange and wonderful. Each ball, assuming you hit the Raid Boss, gives you the same chance to catch it. So, if you have a 20% chance, each ball would only ever give you that 20% chance, no more, no less.

The odds of you not getting that 20%, however, go down with every ball. So, if you only have one ball, the odds of you making the catch are still 20%. If you have 10 balls, the odds of you making the catch with any one of those balls is cumulatively much higher.

Likewise if you do more raids.

Your chances of getting Lugia may start at around 14% for a great shot with a single Premier Ball, but it goes to over 60% if you consistently hit with all the Premier Balls you get, and to over 100% if yo do four or more Raid Battles.

In other words, do as many raids as you can, get as many balls as you can, and make your shots as consistently as you can.

TL;DR again: How do you catch the Raid Boss in Pokémon Go?

Raid Bosses are really hard to catch, so you probably won't catch every one you face. To increase your odds:

  1. ABC. Always be curving. Once you can nail Curve Ball every time, you'll get a 1.7x bonus every time.
  2. Max out your medals. Some are easier to get than others but once you get them, it's an automatic 1.1x to 1.3x bonus to your catch.
  3. Play patient. Raid bosses defend better than normal Pokémon, so wait until 3/4 of the way through their attack animation and then make your catch. You should hit just as the ring appears.
  4. Consistency counts. Aim for the smallest throw bonus you can nail every time. If that's Nice, it's nice. If that's Great or Excellent, even nicer. But better the bonus you get then one you miss, and every extra 1.3 to 2x counts.
  5. Go Golden: You'll get Golden Razz Berries every time you win a raid, so don't be afraid to use them. They're a 2.5x bonus and can make a big difference.
  6. Keep hitting. Your chance to catch with any one Premier Ball is low but your chance to catch with multiple Premier Ball hits over multiple Raids becomes close to a statistical sure thing. So never give up!

Any Legendary or standard Raid Boss catching questions?

If you stack your bonuses right, you have a higher probability of catching any Raid Bosses, even Legendary . But you have to stack. If you have any questions, drop them in the comments below!

<!--*/ <!--*/ img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/