Here’s How You Will Be Able to Setup Face ID on the iPhone 8 [Update: More Details]

Posted on September 9, 2017 by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
The leaked iOS 11 GM build has provided plenty of details about the iPhone 8 and its various features. Now, another post from 9to5Mac details how Face ID on the handset will be setup. Continue reading

iOS 11 GM May Have Been Leaked by Disgruntled Apple Employee

Posted on by Gautam Prabhu.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Apple is famous for being the most secretive company in the world, but since the launch of the iPhone, the company has had trouble preventing leaks about the upcoming iPhones and devices. However, the leak of the iOS 11 GM builds last night including the build for the 10th anniversary iPhone, has been the mother of all leaks in Apple’s history. Continue reading

Plug In Just About Anything With This 6-Port Hub [Deals Hub]

Posted on by StackSocial.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Laptops have gotten smaller and slimmer in recent years, making them more portable than ever. There’s a trade off though: to slim down the devices, ports often have to fall by the wayside. Not everyone is ready to leave behind all that connectivity. Luckily you don’t have to. All you need is the Casa USB-C 6-Port Hub to make it easy to connect everything. It’s on sale now from the iPhone Hacks Deals Hub. Continue reading

The next iPhone creates animated emoji from your facial expressions

Posted on by Jon Fingas.
Categories: Uncategorized.

You may already know that the next iPhone will use face detection for all kinds of clever tricks, but here's one you probably weren't expecting: customized emoji. The 9to5Mac crew has discovered that leaked "gold master" iOS 11 firmware includes references to 'Animoji,' or 3D emoji that you create using your facial expressions and voice. Pick one of the familiar non-human faces in the emoji library and it'll map your eye, mouth and cheek expressions to that character -- you can make a robot smile or have a dog raise its eyebrows. Even the poo emoji can be animated. This comes across as a gimmick (we can see many people dropping this once the novelty wears off), but it shows what's possible now that Apple has face tracking at its disposal. And there's more to the leak than just emoji.

Via: TechCrunch

Source: 9to5Mac (1), (2), S. Troughton-Smith (Twitter)

How to block websites in Safari on iPhone and iPad

Posted on by Luke Filipowicz.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Create a safer internet for your children in iPhone and iPad.

If you have children with iPhones or iPads, or who frequently use yours, and you want to control the type of content they can access when browsing the web in Safari, you're in luck - Apple lets you do just that. Whether you want to automatically limit all adult content to prevent a child from accidentally hitting a link they shouldn't, blacklist specific websites, or shut off all sites except for the ones you specifically whitelist, you'll find everything you need right in Settings and Restrictions. Here's how to manage the parental controls (restrictions) for web content.

How to blacklist specific content or sites in Safari for iPhone and iPad

If you're not overly worried and just want to try to prevent your kids from hitting links that take them to adult material, or there are only a few sites you want to make sure they never land on, you can use the automatic settings and the blacklist feature.

  1. Launch the Settings app from the Home screen.
  2. Tap General.
  3. Tap Restrictions.

  4. Tap Enable Restrictions. If already enabled, skip to step 6.
  5. Type a 4-digit password that your children won't be able to guess.
  6. Type your password again to confirm it.

  7. Tap on Websites under Allowed Content .
  8. Tap on Limit Adult Content.

  9. Tap Add a Website under NEVER ALLOW.
  10. Type the URL of the website you wish to block in the Website field.
  11. Tap Done.

Repeat this process for each site you'd like to block access to. Keep in mind that if certain websites have mobile sites, you may need to block them separately. For instance, to block CrackBerry completely, you would need to block www.crackberry.com, m.crackberry.com, and t.crackberry.com since they have specified sites for tablets, smartphones, and full blown browsers.

If you find a site not blocking after you included it in your restricted websites list, visit that site and look in the Address Bar of Safari to make sure you're blocking the correct URL. Copy it if you need to and paste it into restrictions.

How to block everything and whitelist only specific sites in Safari for iPhone and iPad

For very young children, or if you simply want to make sure nothing is accessible except what you specifically allow, you can disable everything and then only turn back on the sites you consider absolutely permissible. (Like Apple or Disney).

  1. Launch the Settings app from the Home screen.
  2. Tap General.
  3. Tap Restrictions.

  4. Tap Enable Restrictions. If already enabled, skip to step 6.
  5. Type a 4-digit password that your children won't be able to guess.
  6. Type your password again to confirm it.

  7. Tap on Websites.
  8. Tap on Specific Websites Only.
  9. Tap Add a Website.

  10. Type the URL of the website you wish to allow in the Website field.

  11. Tap Done.

As with the blacklist, you might need to add variations, such as mobile versions, if a site has iPhone or iPad-specific URLs.

Updated September 2017: We've updated the information so it's relevant to both iOS 10 and iOS 11.

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How to enable and use Maps extensions on iPhone and iPad

Posted on by Luke Filipowicz.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do I turn on and use Maps extensions on my iPhone or iPad?

It's easy to get more out of the Maps app by allowing third-party apps to add extensions. The primary purpose of app extensions is to give you the ability to do things like book a reservation at a restaurant or call for a ride from services like Uber, without having to leave Maps. This kind of integration frees up your precious time, by cutting out the need to switch between different apps to accomplish your goals.

How to enable Maps extensions on iPhone and iPad

  1. Launch the Settings app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap Maps.
  3. Tap the On/Off switch next to the extension you want to enable. Green means it's on.

Note: If you don't see the app you are looking for underneath the extensions section in the Settings menu, make sure your apps are updated to the latest version that supports iOS 10 or later.

How to use Maps extensions on iPhone and iPad

Every Maps extension is going to work a little differently, but to give you a rough idea of how they work, I will use OpenTable to show you how it can work.

  1. Launch Maps from your Home Screen.
  2. Tap the search bar
  3. Start typing in the name of the restaurant you want.

  4. Tap on the option you want
  5. Tap the Reservations: OpenTable button.

From here you can arrange all the details of your reservation, including what time, the number of people coming and even write special request. After your information is all entered, you will be redirected to the OpenTable app to confirm your reservation.

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

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MacBook and MacBook Pro rumor roundup: What’s coming next

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

In 2015, MacBook kicked off the current generation of Apple laptops. In 2016, the MacBook Pro took another big step forward. So — what's coming next?

In March of 2015, Apple introduced the all-new 12-inch MacBook. Not Air. Not Pro. And certainly not at the old, white, plastic MacBook's pricepoint. More shocking was its ports — or more precisely, its lack thereof. Gone was MagSafe, Apple's convenient, tumble-preventing, dent-saving connector. Gone was old-school USB-A. Nowhere was Thunderbolt. Instead, Apple introduced USB-C.

These changes came to 2016's MacBook Pro, too, along with an OLED-screen Touch Bar in lieu of function keys and a gorgeous Wide Color display.

So, what's next for the MacBook lineup?

When will Apple update the MacBook?

Here's the previous update schedule:

  • March 2015: MacBook with Intel Broadwell CoreM
  • March 2016: MacBook with Intel Skylake CoreM and rose gold color option
  • October 2016: MacBook Pro with Intel Skylake Core i5 and i7 processors
  • June 2017: MacBook and MacBook Pro with Intel Kaby Lake processors

Apple could drop new MacBooks or MacBook Pros at any time — and if the updates are iterative, we could wake up to a press release and an updated web page any morning.

A bigger update, like to Intel's next-generation Coffee Lake processors, probably won't come until 2018 at the earliest.

Will the next MacBook get Touch Bar and Touch ID?

Touch Bar has proven to be divisive: Apple anticipated high attraction levels for Touch Bar, but while some people like it, many others do not. So, will Apple stick with Touch Bar the way the company did with USB-C, and push it out across the line? Or will Apple retrench and rethink its approach to touch? We'll have to wait and see.

Touch ID, on the other hand, is such a convenience on the 2016 MacBook Pro that not expanding it to all other portable Macs would be a letdown. The only reason it might not is price point: It requires a secure, dedcated processing and display system — think embedded Apple Watch just for Apple Pay — so it adds about $200-$300 to the bill.

It's possible Apple could do what it did with MacBook Pro and offer MacBook (Escape) and MacBook (Touch Bar) options, the former with traditional function keys, the latter with OLED. Otherwise, fingers crossed Apple can figure out how to save a few dollars elsewhere and get Touch ID in and under budget.

And a Force Touch Bar, right?

Love the way you think! Touch Bar is begging for Force Touch, but it's unclear if the technology is ready for the next generation of MacBook Pro or MacBook.

What about Face ID?

Face ID for the MacBook and MacBook Pro seems like something that has to arrive sooner rather than later. It's already rumored for iPhone 8, after all. The only real question is how long would it take to propagate from phones to laptops?

Windows already does facial recognition to unlock, and it'd be great on a Mac. That way, Apple Watch Auto Unlock, Touch ID, and Face Unlock could be in a three-way race!

Could Apple ditch the keyboard entirely for a multi-force-touch surface?

That rumor has been around for a while. The idea of doing to the laptop keyboard what Apple did to the smartphone keyboard is compelling for a number of reasons — and terrifying for a number of reasons as well!

At some point, tactile simulation technologies could be advanced enough to trick out brain into feeling keys, dials, nobs, and other dynamically changing controls where none really exist, but we're probably not there yet.

More USB-C?

Apple wanted to create a MacBook that was entirely wireless. Since wireless charging wasn't an option, though, Apple had to include at least one wire. So, it made that wire a multi-tasker. USB-C can both charge and carry data. Since one was infinitely more than none, that was enough, right?

Wrong. Not only isn't wireless charging a thing yet, MacBooks still don't have LTE, and Bluetooth still isn't good enough to support real, diverse peripherals. The future, as always, is a beautiful lie.

The MacBook Pro does this right, with its two to four USB-C ports; it seems only natural that the MacBook should follow in these footsteps. There are no doubt power and design constraints that may make two USB-C ports more challenging than one in a MacBook, especially when it comes to where they can be mounted on that tiny motherboard. But it's a challenge worth exploring.

In a perfect world, I'd love to see them on both sides, like the higher-end MacBook Pro, so I can charge from either side. I'd settle for them both on one side. It would show Apple can still bring us the future — but in a way that mitigates the real pain points of the present.

And they'd be USB-C and Thunderbolt 3, right? RIGHT?

Look, no blogger should ever substitute their fantasies for engineering realities. But if Thunderbolt 3 is possible on MacBook Pro, it'd be outstanding to have it on MacBook. Consistency is absolutely a customer-facing feature.

You mentioned LTE, any chance...?

I've always suspected getting LTE in a MacBook was more about the extortion-level licensing fees Qualcomm charges than any real philosophical or technical hurdles within Apple. The current round of lawsuits only deepens those suspicions, as does the rumors that Apple is working on its own LTE modem.

I very much hope we get LTE-equipped MacBooks — and soon. We may just have to let the lawsuit dust settle first.

How about next-generation Intel Coffee Lake processors?

If and when Coffee Lake is available in the types of chipsets Apple uses in MacBook and MacBook Pro, there are a few things to look out for:

  1. Coffee Lake will allow for a higher number of cores per processor. Previously available primarily on the higher-end Xeon line, pressure from AMD's Ryzen Threadripper has gotten intel to push desktop chips up from 4 cores and 8 threads to 6 cores and 12 threads.
  2. Faster memory speeds.
  3. Updated Thunderbolt and USB support. Thunderbolt 3 still doesn't support even older DisplayPort standards. We'll see if Coffee Lake fares better.

Any chance new laptops could run on ARM, use iOS, have a full multitouch display, and support Apple Pencil?

This is more of a strategic decision for Apple than a technical one. Both MacBook and iPad Pro tackle the problem of ultra-light computing from different directions. Currently, macOS lacks a touch-first interface and that would take time and resources to build out (see Windows 8). Arguably that time and those resources would be better invested in making iOS a better primary computing platform on iPad and larger screens in general.

iOS also lacks a pointer system, though adding selection (like on Apple TV) and cursor (like in text editing mode), seems like far less work. (Again, not an engineer, so everything seems both easy and impossible to me!)

A MacBook that's essentially an iPad Pro with a proper keyboard, SurfaceBook-style, would be incredibly interesting to me. Apple prototypes everything, so we'll have to see what's interesting to them.

But it'd be killer at coffee shops and on planes. I'm just saying...

Jet black? (Product) RED?

Ha! I knew that was what all this was coming to!

MacBook is currently the only laptop from Apple that comes in color. (Sorry, MacBook Pro, silver and space gray aren't colors). Gold debuted with the original and rose gold came last year.

I'm not sure if the Jet Black process scales or holds up to MacBook. I'd love to see it, microabrasions, and all. (Product Red) at that size would be a lot of red. Maybe too much red?

Apple treats color finishes like features because that's how we treat them. We get as excited for new colors — more excited even — than we do for new configurations.

Personally, I'd like to see how Apple would handle Space Blue or Space Purple.

What do you want to see from the next MacBook?

The MacBook Pro with Touch Bar is a bold new machine that pushes the future of displays, ports, and input, but it's also one that risks leaving many traditional Mac users behind. Whether that's ultimately good or bad, we'll have to wait in see. For now, it's your turn. What do you want to see in Apple's next Mac laptop?

Updated September, 2016: Intel Coffee Lake, Face ID, and more new rumors added.

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Animoji will sell iPhones

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Bleeding edge 3D scanning sensors aren't very relatable. Animoji that take on your facial expressions and make iMessage even more emotionally resonant? Take our money!

It's been a bad year Apple firmware leaks. Last month it was unfiltered HomePod firmware accidentally placed in a public directory. This weekend it was iOS 11 Gold Master (GM) firmware leaked to a news outlet.

Leaks happen. They suck for Apple, which loses the value of surprise at the upcoming keynote, and all the employees who have their weekends shattered, their grand unveilings ruined, and will face yet tighter and less convenient disclosure policies going forward. But, they can also help consumers get an earlier, if murkier, glimpse at what's coming up next, so they can better plan their purchases.

I have no beef with leaks. Revel in them or avoid them as you wish, just like you do movie trailers, script leaks, and episode bootlegs. The choice is entirely yours. Just don't read the spoilers and then claim nothing surprised you and everything was boring. Because that's a dick move.

Which brings me, circuitously, to Animoji.

The power of emoji

A funny thing happened at WWDC 2016. Apple's vice-president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, announced "larger emoji" for the company's iMessage platform, and he got one of the biggest rounds of applause at the event.

Understandably so. Messaging is ludicrously popular on mobile. China basically runs on WeChat, Facebook has launched and bought almost as many messaging services as Google has abandoned. And iMessage is the most popular app on iOS.

People love messaging but, increasingly, they love messaging not just with text but with stickers, emoji, and similar visuals.

That's because text, by itself, is a dry, emotionless, and easily misconstrued. Text someone you'll be late and they're likely to get upset with you. Send them a funny sticker or emoji of you racing their way, though, and you just might get a smile instead.

Rumor has it Apple had an even bigger emojification feature planned for the event — one that would emojify the sender — but weren't quite happy with the results. Animoji, if the leaks are right, seems like a vastly better idea and implementation.

Enter, Animoji

Apple has been experimenting with animated emoji for a while. Apple Watch at launch featured animated faces, hearts, and hands. Animoji take things to the next level.

From 9to5Mac:

'Animoji' [uses] the 3D face sensors to create custom 3D animated emoji based on the expressions you make into the camera.

Users will be able to make Animoji of unicorns, robots, pigs, pile of poo and many more.

The Animoji apparently let you "create custom animated messages that use your voice and reflect your facial expressions."

You'll presumably need the more expensive iPhone X — or iPhone 8, iPhone Edition, iPhone Pro, or whatever Apple ends up calling the next(er)-generation OLED iPhone — for them to work, but that's the point.

Selling iPhones

I'm buying tongue-in-cheek when I say a feature like Animoji will sell iPhones. Kind of. The original iPhone lacked many features found in other smartphones of the day but had a user experience so compelling many people didn't care. They just saw the pinch-to-zoom, CoverFlow, rubber banding, and were blown away.

It's those small but incredibly important little touches that speak to people and influence purchasing decisions. Things that take complex new technologies like multitouch and make them relatable.

Animoji and other fun new features like Face ID will help do that for the new sensors in the new iPhone. They'll take complex new technologies like real-time 3D scanning and make them relatable.

Compelling, even.

Leaked iOS 11 Firmware Reveals Apple will Unveil ‘iPhone X’, ‘iPhone 8’ and ‘iPhone 8 Plus’ on Sept 12

Posted on by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
The latest leak from iOS Golden Master suggests that Apple will call the OLED iPhone as the iPhone X, with the other two iPhone variants being called iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. Continue reading

How to use Siri to get directions and maps on iPhone or iPad

Posted on by Mike Tanasychuk.
Categories: Uncategorized.

If you've got both hands on the wheel and don't know where you're going, Siri and Maps can help.

With Siri and Apple's built-in Maps, you know longer have to stop, type, and search for directions. You can simply tell Siri where you want to go, and you'll get a route to go right there. It's great if you're in a new area of town or traveling in a new city. And if you get lost, you can even ask Siri to take you home.

How to get directions with Siri and Maps on iPhone and iPad

Lost? Hey, Siri!

  1. Launch Siri, either by holding down the Home button or saying, "Hey, Siri."
  2. Say something like, "directions to 529 Wellington Avenue."
  3. Tap the option you want if Siri presents multiple.
  4. Tap a mode of transportation. Otherwise, Siri will pick Drive or Walk, depending on how close you are.
    • Drive
    • Walk
    • Transit
    • Ride
  5. Tap Start to begin navigation immediately. It'll start within five seconds if you don't.

From there, Siri will guide you, turn by turn, to where you want to go.

How to find local businesses with Siri and Maps on iPhone and iPad

Not sure of place names? If you just ask Siri to direct you to the nearest restaurant or gas station, she can help you find what you're looking for!

  1. Launch Siri either by holding down the Home button or saying, "Hey, Siri."
  2. Say something like, "directions to the nearest Chinese restaurant?"
  3. Tap the option you want if Siri presents more than one.
  4. Tap a mode of transportation. Otherwise, Siri will choose Drive or Walk, depending on how close you are.
    • Drive
    • Walk
    • Transit
  5. Tap Start to begin navigation. Otherwise, Siri will start within five seconds.

How to find your way home with Siri and Maps

You first have to make sure that you have yourself added as a contact to your iPhone or iPad and have your address added to your contact card.

  1. Launch Siri by either holding down the Home button or saying, "Hey, Siri."
  2. Say something like, "how do I get home?" or "take me home."
  3. Tap a mode of transportation. Otherwise, Siri will pick Drive or Walk, depending on how close you are.
    • Drive
    • Walk
    • Transit
  4. Tap Start to being navigation immediately. It'll start within five seconds if you don't.

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

Updated September 2017: Made sure everything is current for iOS 11.

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Apple Watch Series 3 rumor roundup: Everything you need to know

Posted on by Serenity Caldwell.
Categories: Uncategorized.

We may well get a new Apple Watch this fall — if so, here are the rumors and speculation you need to know about now.

Apple Watch Series 2 debuted in September of 2016 but, as is my wont, I'm already thinking about the next version. What will it look like? What new features will it have that pique my fancy?

Don't get me wrong: I love my current Apple Watch. The Series 2 offered huge battery improvements for both 38mm and 42mm users, and I use it to track my workouts and respond to notifications almost every day. But if I had my druthers, I wouldn't mind seeing an updated Series 3 later this year.

September 9, 2017: iOS 11 GM firmware leaks new colors for Apple Watch casing

As 9to5Mac continues to dig through the supposed Gold Master (GM) firmware leak of iOS 11, more evidence appears about changes to Apple Watch. There are two references in the firmware update that point to new colors for Apple Watch casings.

It seems Apple Watch Series 3 will come in a new 'blush gold' color for the aluminium Sport watches and a new gray ceramic material for the Apple Watch Edition.

Though these new colors are mentioned, there is no evidence that Apple will unveil them at the September 12 iPhone event or whether the gray ceramic case will replace or coexist with the white ceramic model. Hopefully, we'll get some new band options to accessorize with them.

September 8, 2017: iOS 11 GM firmware leaks Apple Watch LTE ahead of September event

An apparent leak of the iOS 11 GM firmware, expected to be released after the keynote on Tuesday, September 12, 2017, has given us a glimpse of what might just be the much-anticipated Apple Watch LTE.

9to5Mac found the image while diving through the leaked firmware:

The presence of a pre-iOS 11-styled signal meter, though, is what makes it apparent this is the cellular-enabled version of the Apple Watch. There are also complications for phone connectivity and navigation, further suggesting the presence of new wireless radios.

Apple has been planning Watch LTE for years, working to keep the same casing — and more importantly, band compatibility — while managing the power, heat, and reception demands of cellular networking.

We should see the final version in just a few days.

August 16, 2017: Cellular Apple Watch will reportedly have eSIM, lack support for voice over cellular

According to a new report from KGI (via 9to5Mac), the rumored cellular version of the next Apple Watch will utilize an eSIM, rather than a physical SIM card. Additionally, the cellular watch is said not to support phone calls on a cellular network at launch, and will instead be focused primarily on data transfers.

August 15, 2017: Apple Watch 3 again said to have a cellular option

Backing up previous reports, including one from KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, CNBC claims that Apple will indeed offer a cellular version of the next Apple Watch, likely to be called the Apple Watch Series 3. The watch will reportedly make its debut alongside new iPhones in September.

Apple is gearing up to release a new Apple Watch which will not require tethering to an iPhone for key functions like calls, making it a standalone device, a source with knowledge of the matter told CNBC.

August 14, 2017: Apple Watch 3 said to have both cellular and non-cellular options

KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo (via 9to5Mac) is claiming that, much like iPads, customers will be able to choose from a version of the Apple Watch Series 3 with cellular connectivity and one without.

Additionally, Kuo reports that the third Apple Watch will not see a major redesign this year.

August 4, 2017: LTE-equipped Apple Watch could arrive this year

According to a new report from Bloomberg, Apple is planning to release a version of the Apple Watch that can connect to cellular networks later this year.

Meanwhile, Daring Fireball's John Gruber says that the upcoming Apple Watch may sport an "all-new form factor" as well.

Equipped with LTE chips, at least some new Apple Watch models, planned for release by the end of the year, will be able to conduct many tasks without an iPhone in range, the people said. For example, a user would be able to download new songs and use apps and leave their smartphone at home.

May 15, 2017: Apple is rumored to be including glucose monitoring and smart bands, offering additional features, in an upcoming Apple Watch

A non-invasive glucose monitor has been rumored for Apple Watch for a while but a new report suggests the feature is getting a lot of focus.

From Boy Genius:

According to our source, Apple's sights are now set on the epidemic of diabetes, and the company plans to introduce a game-changing glucose monitoring feature in an upcoming Apple Watch. An estimated 30 million people suffer from diabetes in the US alone, according to the American Diabetes Association, so Apple's efforts could lead to a historic achievement in the world of health and fitness.

Also rumored, smart bands:

Apple also plans to introduce interchangeable "smart watch bands" that add various functionality to the Apple Watch without added complexity, and without increasing the price of the watch itself. This could also mean that the glucose monitoring feature will be implemented as part of a smart band, rather than being built into the watch hardware.

A camera band that adds a camera to the watch is another possibility, or a band that contains a battery to extend battery life for wearers who want even more longevity, even though the Apple Watch's battery performance is already class-leading

Apple Watch already has a mini Lightning port inside the band groove, though it's currently sealed away for diagnostic use only. How Apple would connect to smart bands, though, remains to be seen.

I'd love a Batman style grappling hook band, though. (No, you don't understand physics!)


When's the next Apple Watch going to come out?

There's not a ton of speculation out right now, but if we were betting folk, we might lean toward the Fall season, around the same time as the next iPhone. An April report from Digitimes also suggests a Fall 2017 launch for the Series 3 Apple Watch — on par with what we've heard previously. Not only does that give the company the year to perfect new hardware, but it would continue the Watch's release cycle alongside Apple's most popular product, the iPhone, standardized in 2016 with the release of the Series 2. Given that the Apple Watch requires an iPhone to function, it seems logical to pair the two.

What's it going to look like?

Apple still hasn't released official numbers on how well the Watch and its various lines are doing, but I'd expect both the Sport and steel Apple Watch casings to show up in Series 3 — though we might see a new anodized color option in the Sport line. (Perhaps a Product RED Sport?)

We also might see a new Apple Watch Edition, replacing the Ceramic model. (Personally, I'm rooting for meteorite.)

What about a round version?

While I'd love to see some variation on Apple Watch styling, a round Apple Watch would require a round interface; on top of that, to prevent fragmentation, watchOS would have to work on both rounded rectangle and circular Apple Watches. That's a big challenge for the company's software team, and perhaps not one Apple feels up to tackling for 2017.

What sizes will it come in?

Some people like big watches, just like some people like Plus-sized phones, so we won't say never on the prospect of a bigger model; that said, 38mm and 42mm seem to be doing well for the company for now, though, and will probably continue into series 3.

What kind of bands will be available?

Expect new Fall colors for Apple's Sport, Woven Nylon, Classic Buckle, and Modern Buckle, along with a potential new mystery band or two. We might also see new Nike and Hermès colors as well, and perhaps other designers getting into the mix.

As MacRumors noted earlier in 2017, Apple has filed patents for modular bands that could add additional functionality to the watch, including additional battery life, haptics, health sensors, and more, though it's hard to bet on when (if ever) a patented product will see the light of day.

How about the internals?

The S1P and S2 processor powering the Series 1 and 2 Apple Watch gave the original "Series 0" Apple Watch a huge upgrade; though we'd expect a minor boost to speed with S3, I don't think it'll be as noticeable as the jump from Series 0 to 2. That said, the smoother watchOS gets, the better for everyone — I still run into lags here and there, especially on third-party apps.

As with the first- and second-generation Apple Watch, we expect to see Quanta (out of Taiwan) handling its production; a report from supply tracker DigiTimes confirmed this in early January 2017. The Taiwanese outlet also reported that the new Apple Watch may see a new film-on-glass touchscreen replace the previous iteration.

What about battery life?

As with processor, the Series 2 watches both gained big improvements to battery life, with both models now lasting a full 18-hour day — with workouts — without needing a charge. Apple can never stop innovating in this arena, however, especially if it plans to one day allow the watch to sleep tracking (without having to own separate "day" and "night" Apple Watches).

Will Series 3 get cellular data, decoupling it from the iPhone?

Series 2 brought us a GPS antenna, which added more offline functionality to the Apple Watch when running or swimming. But will Series 3 bring us a fully-fleged cellular processor? It's a lovely idea, but I suspect that it would still come at a huge expense to battery life.

Could Apple engineer a watch that was the same size, with all-day battery life and a cellular antenna? Maybe. But unless Apple comes up with a revolutionary new battery by the fall, I'm still of the opinion that it will be too much power for such a small device.

Susquehanna Financial Group semiconductor analyst Christopher Rolland believes otherwise: In a March 2017 report covered by Barron's, he noted:

We understand a model of the next Apple watch will include a SIM card, and therefore is likely to support LTE. We understand some issues remain, including battery life and form factor size, but significant progress has been made. Apple may be employing VOIP and data across a CAT-M1 connection for superior battery life. Apple will tout interoperability with the company's AirPods (now on back order till May) to make and receive phone calls (perhaps a small win for Maxim with amps in each ear bud).

Successful battery life is a pretty big issue in ensuring the watch's success, but who knows? If Apple can figure out how to make a cellular connection work reliably without draining the battery or bulking up the design, it would be a huge perk for potential upgraders and new users alike.

There are also considerations regarding carriers to be made: Would the Apple Watch use data from your iPhone plan, or would it have its own data plan? How would you sign up?

Regardless of whether the new Apple Watch gets a cellular connection, I'd like to see more options from the Apple Watch's Wi-Fi antenna: Given the Apple TV's ability to dictate passwords, the Apple Watch should be able to integrate this feature to connect to any Wi-Fi network, protected or open — even if your iPhone hasn't been there yet.

Any new health sensors?

Health is a huge part of the Apple Watch's message, but right now, the company's somewhat limited in what it can do without FDA approval — and the organization's involvement during development, which could compromise Apple's vaunted security policies.

The current Apple Watch has a pulse oximeter on the rear casing; when pressed against your wrist, it uses a technology called photoplethysmography to measure how fast blood is flowing through your veins. Currently, Apple just uses this sensor for pulse readings, though in theory, the company could also use it to check the oxygen saturation in your blood, or (as suggested by a recent patent uncovered by AppleInsider) identify who's wearing the watch based on your heart patterns.

There are currently third-party apps that do this on the iPhone by having you press your finger up against the rear camera and flash, but they're expressly marked with warnings that disqualify it as "official" testing hardware, and encourage anyone with medical problems to see a doctor. (See my above comment about "FDA-approved and tested.")

The same goes for blood pressure and glucose monitoring. CNBC reported that the blood sugar monitor has made significant progress.

The initiative is far enough along that Apple has been conducting feasibility trials at clinical sites across the Bay Area and has hired consultants to help it figure out the regulatory pathways.

While they would be fantastic statistics for users with blood pressure problems and diabetes, Apple may be better off pairing with third-party Bluetooth devices that are FDA-approved. That's not to say we won't see these sensors in the Series 3 — but if we do, expect to hear about them through the FDA's approval process first.

Additionally, if the company can improve battery life, we may well see the introduction of sleep tracking. There are a few apps (like David Smith's excellent Sleep++) that can do this already on the watch, but they require significant battery use and the ability to charge the timepiece in the morning.

I also wouldn't be surprised to see more information from Apple's chief operating officer and Health spokesperson Jeff Williams on CareKit and ResearchKit; both features have the potential to change patients' lives for the better, and Apple will no doubt be touting the studies — and any new trials — as part of the Watch experience in the Fall.

Will I be able to use my Android phone with the Series 3?

We haven't heard anything to that effect. But if the company wants to make Apple Watch available to the largest group of users, it's a smart move to consider — and there's precedent in Apple Music, iTunes, the iPod, and iPhone. And given that Android Wear watches support the iPhone, there may be a strong business incentive to move in that direction.

Of course, Apple may want to keep the Watch platform-exclusive; depending on the wearable's features, it might be another good way to convert users to iPhone.

Any word on watchOS 4?

A few nibbles here and there, mostly around new sports activities for the Workout app.

watchOS 4 — Everything you need to know!

Your hopes?

What do you want the next Apple Watch to look like? Me, I'm hoping for at least some of the following:

  • More health features: An oximeter (to read blood oxygen levels) would be pretty cool, as would a second-generation sensor with better pulse tracking during workouts.
  • A slimmer case: I wouldn't trade it for battery life, but if anyone could figure out how to make a thinner watch with the same battery tech, it's Apple.
  • Always-on display: Like a slimmer case, this requires Apple to have its battery needs in check; that said, it's one of my only remaining nitpicks with the current generation of Apple Watch.
  • Round face: Honestly, I don't know if I actually want this or just want to see Apple's take on it. Either way, round faces are traditionally more flattering to ladies' wrists (though they need to be sized accordingly).
  • Decorative bands: I'd love a more eclectic, jewelry-style band from Apple. Why not?
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Recover your lost data with Data Rescue 4, now just $49

Posted on by Cale Hunt.
Categories: Uncategorized.

There are plenty of ways that you can prevent data loss on your PC, but when it happens — and it's too late to prevent — you need a special kind of software to help you get it back.

Never lose another file again with this award-winning data recovery software! Learn more

The type of software you need to recover data can be quite pricey, but iMore Digital Offers right now has a deal on Data Rescue 4. Instead of paying $79, you'll instead pay just $49. That's 37 percent off the regular price!

Data Rescue 4 can be used to recover crashed, corrupted, and non-mounting hard drives so that you can regain access to your files. You can clone entire drives for easier recovery, and it can be used to recover digital photos from your camera. Using Boot Camp? Use Data Rescue 4 on an NTFS partition.

Get Data Rescue 4 right now for just $49 Learn more

Whether or not you've already lost data to a crash or accidental deletion, Data Rescue 4 is a pro tool to have in your corner. Don't wait too long; this deal won't last forever.

Best Fitbit for Men

Posted on by Mike Tanasychuk.
Categories: Uncategorized.

I know what boys like.

Men like to exercise a certain way (just as women do) and there may be certain aspects of fitness that men like to track more than others. If you're looking for a Fitbit or looking for one to buy your guy, then these are your best choices!

Best Fitbit for the jogging gentleman

Us dudes, bro, we like to run. After babes, after food trucks, after our feelings (just kidding, we run away from those. Stereotypes, am I right?!). We sometimes like to run with our Fitbits on. Which Fitbit is best for these occasions?

Fitbit Charge 2

The Charge 2 has replaced the old Charge HR and makes some major improvements in some key areas. The Charge 2 still comes with Fitbit's built-in PurePulse technology, which monitors and reports your heart rate while you're on the go. Plus, it can still monitor you're sleeping, so feel free to take that post-jog afternoon nap.

You don't have to pull out your smartphone to check the time or see who's calling you because the Charge 2 has you covered with a tap-activated OLED display, which is much larger now, that will show you the time of day and call notifications as they come through.

When you're in the zone and hitting the last mile before you reach home, you don't want the distraction of having to whip out your phone to see who's calling and/or how long you've been running. Get the Charge 2 and keep going! Pricing starts around $150.

See at Amazon

Best Fitbit for weight-lifting and sports-playing sirs

If your man's out getting his swell on and super serial about shredding, or if he's hitting the links or the baseball diamond, he needs a Fitbit that can keep up with him.

Fitbit Surge

The Fitbit Surge is Fitbit's mightiest model and if you wants to become Earth's Mightiest Mortal, then may we suggest Fitbit's mightiest model?

The Surge has it all: GPS tracking, heart rate monitor, and, most importantly, Multi-Sport and SmartTrack. With those last two, Fitbit has presets for various types of sports and workouts, so you can tell your Surge exactly what you're doing. This way, it can be as accurate as possible, and it won't be counting all your sweet biceps curls as steps. You can snag it for $200.

See at Amazon

Best Fitbit for the fashionable fella

If you like to keep fit and fashionable at the same time, then he needs a Fitbit that can match his style at any time of day.

Fitbit Blaze

The fashion-conscious, $200 Blaze is more than just a step counter. With its sleek watch-like design and customizable wristband, this one is definitely for Monsieur haute couture.

The Blaze has metal and leather bands in three different colors and a customizable watch face, so you really can make it your own. It also boasts music controls so that you can customize the soundtrack to your style. It's style within style, within style. Someone call Mr. Nolan.

See at Amazon


The brass tacks ('cause those are manly)

Get the device that's best tailored to your workout habits. I mean, he did contribute to half of your DNA. Grab the Fitbit that works best for him, or let him choose one himself.

Check out our article on the best Fitbits for women for the other side of the coin.

Fitbit Ionic

Yes, the Ionic is on its way and upon its release, we'll reevaluate our choices!

Updated September 2017: These are still the best Fitbit options for men (manly men) in tights.

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iOS 11 GM Leak Details How the Status Bar on iPhone 8 Will Work

Posted on by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
The iPhone 8’s notch display design had many people confused as to how the status bar in iOS 11 will work. Thanks to the leaked Golden Master build, this mystery has now also been solved. Continue reading

How to find the best transit route in Apple Maps on iPhone

Posted on by Lory Gil.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you use Apple Maps to find the perfect transit route for your personal needs? It's easy!

Apple has a few useful features specific to transit directions, making it easier to navigate the big city without a car. You can easily see transit stops for specific lines and, whenever multiple lines are available, you'll see all of the possible route suggestions. Here's how.

How to highlight stops for a specific transit line in Apple Maps

If you are trying to get around a particular city using public transportation, you can now check out the different destinations of specific transit routes, just in case you want to change lines mid-trip.

  1. Launch Maps from your Home screen.
  2. Pull up the directions you want for the destination you're going to.
  3. Tap Transit mode.

  4. Tap a stop on the selected transit line.
  5. Tap the stop name that pops up.
  6. Scroll down to see other transportation activity at that same stop.

    You can also see the next three scheduled arrival times and how often the transit line runs.

How to see what others are saying about a particular stop on a transit line in Apple Maps

If you're in an unfamiliar city taking public transportation, you might be worried about whether certain stops are populated with riff-raff. You can find reviews of many major transit stops from commuters who have been there before. Apple Maps incorporates basic information, as well as reviews and pictures from Yelp, right into the app.

  1. Launch Maps from your Home screen.
  2. Pull up the Directions you want for the destination you're going to.
  3. Tap Transit mode.

  4. Tap a stop on the selected transit line.
  5. Tap the stop name that pops up.
  6. Scroll down until you see the photos, Wikipedia entry, and Yelp reviews.

How to filter transit directions by type in Apple Maps

You may be a boss when it comes to taking the subway, but feel like a fish out of water when you step on a bus. In major cities, you are lucky enough to have many options for public transportation and can filter your route based on your preferred method of travel in Apple Maps. Depending on available options, you can filter by bus, train, subway, and ferry.

  1. Launch Maps from your Home screen.
  2. Pull up the Directions you want for the destination you're going to.
  3. Tap Transit mode.

  4. Drag the transit directions card up from the bottom of the screen.
  5. Scroll all the way to the bottom of the transit directions card and tap Transit Options.
  6. Tap a transit vehicle to filter it out of the route suggestion results.

Anything else?

Do you have any questions about viewing alternate transit lines in Apple Maps? Let us know in the comments.

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How to keep your crappy cable modem from interfering with your Wi-Fi network

Posted on by Serenity Caldwell.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Internet mysteriously stop working on one device or cut in and out when you least expect it? Don't fall into a double-NAT disaster trap.

When I surprised my parents with a visit home this week, I expected to do the occasional bit of troubleshooting — it's part of the daughter/tech writer gig. What didn't I expect? Wanting to throw my own computer across the room.

It says "Network Unavailable" right here

You see, a few hours after I arrived, my MacBook Pro went from happily scrolling Twitter to flashing a dreaded "Network Unavailable" alert. This isn't that unusual: My folks live next to a mountain, and internet difficulties are not beyond the pale. But this problem was a little different — every other device on our network was still functioning properly. Only my MacBook Pro seemed incapable of loading our wireless network.

At first, I followed my ancient IT troubleshooting tricks to the letter. I tried to troubleshoot in Network Settings. Restarted my computer. Restarted the AirPort. Restarted the modem. And that worked… for about an hour.

Come that evening, I was regularly rebooting the AirPort to get the signal to work for even 30 minutes at a time. (Don't let anyone tell you that cursing networking in all its many forms isn't a fun way to spend a week at home, folks!) I even considered wasting the one bar of AT&T data I could salvage so that I could tether my Mac and get some work done.

But midway through my 15th cycle of agony, I happened to notice a rather strange appearance inside Apple's (otherwise wonderful) AirPort Utility app on my Mac.

If your response to that image is something between an eyebrow raise and a chortle, yeah. That's about right. A double-click on our AirPort station revealed that the router was supposedly running without an internet connection, IP address, or DNS — and that's where I got interested.

Wi-Fi Battle Royale

Unbeknownst to me, my folks had switched cable companies since my last visit — and with that switch came a new cable modem. A cable modem that, like most modern modems of its day, also came equipped with a Wi-Fi network.

For many households, this isn't an issue: You connect to the router in question and its random Wi-Fi network name, likely typing any number of random characters in for the password, and you enjoy clean, crisp, wireless internet access.

But if you also plan to set up your own Wi-Fi network — whether that's a mesh system or Apple's own aging AirPort brand — connecting a Wi-Fi network to a modem that already has an existing Wi-Fi network can cause connection issues.

I'm going to skip a lot of the technical issues inherent here and point you to this excellent explainer on Double NAT by Graeme Noble, but here's a quick metaphor to kick us off:

Imagine a world where every house number (IPv4 addresses) on your street (the internet) is unique.

In order to fit more people (devices) on your street, the housing (cable) companies instead build apartment complexes, each with its own unique number. Inside each complex is a bunch of single-occupancy rooms for people, each with their own apartment number (Private IP address).

Now imagine that inside that complex, one of the residents (your second Wi-Fi network) has created a single-occupancy room right inside the front door, and stuck a bunch of bunk beds inside it; anyone new who comes to this complex is now stuck living in this room, which is now its own mini-apartment complex. It's going to get crowded quickly, right?

This is admittedly an imperfect metaphor — don't kill me, IT nerds — but hopefully illustrates the general point: Double NAT can (not always, but can) make networking confusing and crowded.

In my folks' case, the cable modem's Wi-Fi network wasn't properly assigning the AirPort base station an IP address or DNS, causing a cascade of problems that resulted in my MacBook Pro's internet agony.

The fix: Kill the competition.

How to stop your crappy cable modem Wi-Fi from ruining everything

I will note that there are other options to preserve a Double NAT network or adjust it otherwise, if that's what you want to do. (I again refer you to Graeme Noble here.)

But for troubleshooting my parents' network, the solution was simple: Kill the network; make the modem a dumb pipe; enjoy sweet, blissful AirPort-based Internet.

Here's how to do it.

Step 1: Find your modem's IP address

If you're not sure how to adjust your modem's settings, you're in good company: I've only ever had to fiddle with cable modems directly once or twice in several decades of troubleshooting tech for myself and my parents, so don't feel too lost. Here's what you'll need to do.

  1. First, we're going to find your modem's IP address. This is how you'll log in to your router's settings.
  2. Open System Preferences on your Mac.
  3. Select the Network preference pane.
  4. Make sure Wi-Fi is selected.
  5. Click the Advanced button in the lower right corner.

  6. Select the TCP/IP tab.
  7. Copy the Router number.

Step 2: Log in to your router

  1. Open Safari.
  2. Paste the Router number into Safari's search bar and press Enter.
  3. Your cable company's router login page should appear.

If this isn't working, I recommend searching Google for specific instructions on connecting to your router.

Step 3: Find your router's username and password

Chances are, you'll have never changed your router's username and password, and it's the factory username and password for the router.

  1. Find these credentials either on the bottom of the device or by searching the internet with your router's model name and number.

    The sheer number of routers that use the credentials "admin" and "password" is terrifying.

  2. Log in to your router with these credentials.

Also, probably look up how to change said credentials if your factory password is "password".

Step 4: Kill your router's Wi-Fi (or rename it)

This step will vary depending on your router and cable company, but most admin setups these days offer easy checkboxes to disable a router's Wi-Fi or change its username and password. Which you choose to do depends on how often you feel like logging in via your IP address to troubleshoot Wi-Fi connections, rather than going through AirPort Utility or a mesh networking app.

Personally, I went with killing the modem's Wi-Fi network entirely — my parents know how to troubleshoot the AirPort, and rather than teach them the fun-filled ways of logging into this portal, I wanted to make it easy.

  1. Follow your router's instructions to view your modem's wireless network.
  2. Disable your modem's wireless networks (make sure to disable both 2.4 and 5 GHz bands).

  3. Press Apply.

    (If these instructions don't align with your own personal router admin page, I again recommend searching for documents pertaining to your router online.)

  4. Your router will restart.

The glorious epilogue

Since disabling the Wi-Fi on my parents' modem, I have been happily surfing the internet without issue. And I didn't even throw my computer. Phew.

Have any of you ever run into this crazy problem, iMore? Have a better or different way of solving it? Let me know below.

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