Xiaomi Unveils the Bezel-Less Mi Mix 2 with Ceramic Body Ahead of iPhone X

Posted on September 10, 2017 by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Just a day before Apple is scheduled to launch its bezel-less wonder, the iPhone X, Xiaomi today launched the successor to the phone that started the bezel-less trend last year, the Mi Mix 2. Continue reading

4K Apple TV Will Render Content Natively at 2160p, Require 15Mbps Connection For 4K Streaming

Posted on by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
The iOS 11 GM leak has not only provided details about the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and the iPhone X but also about other devices Apple will be unveiling on September 12. The unveiling of a 4K Apple TV on Tuesday is all but confirmed and thanks to developer Steve Stroughton Smith, we now know a bit more about it. Continue reading

iPhone X Leaks: 6-core A11 Chip, 3GB RAM, Wireless Charging, Apple Pay and Face ID Detailed

Posted on by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
Almost two days after the iOS 11 GM build leak and revealed pretty much everything about the new iPhones from Apple, developers continue to dig deep into the firmware’s code to find out more info about the iPhone X, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus. Continue reading

Apple firmware: Leaks, links, and locking it all down

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

It's not just that HomePod and iOS 11 GM firmware leaked that's problematic for Apple. It's that they could leak.

I'm genuinely more excited for Apple's September 12, 2017 special event than I have been for any event since the iPhone 6. Still, Apple has now had two leaks leading up to the event, widely expected to include the announcement of iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, Apple Watch LTE, and Apple TV 4K HDR. The first one was an accident. The second one, not so much.

John Gruber, writing for Daring Fireball

Again: these URLs were not discovered by guessing the URLs, or because they were published at obvious URLs prematurely. Someone who works at Apple emailed these URLs to 9to5Mac and MacRumors — possibly without even knowing just how much information could be gleaned from these builds compared to the last developer beta builds. UPDATE: Let me clarify that sentence: whoever leaked these URLs knew it would be an incredibly damaging leak, if for no other reason than that they included the IPSW image for iPhone D22. The list of URLs they leaked included every device. The least amount of heretofore unknown information that was going to come out of this leak was massive, and whoever leaked it knew that. What I'm saying is they quite possibly didn't even know just how many little things, things I won't mention here for the sake of DF readers who are trying to stay spoiler-free for Tuesday's event, were spoiled by this leak.

That person should be ashamed of themselves, and should be very worried when their phone next rings.

My understanding is the same as John's: The leak was internal and intentional. And it was incredibly damaging to the company — a company that relies on surprise as a key way to generate marketing buzz and maintain excitement in the media. It's just about impossible to believe anyone in a position to leak those links wouldn't know that.

If that's difficult to understand, just realize that, come Tuesday afternoon, instead of hearing about the announcements and the surprises, we'll be hearing about how the leaks were confirmed and, from those in the media who continually mistake cynicism for intelligence, how "boring" Apple has become.

As hard as it is to believe someone inside Apple would leak the firmware, it just as hard to believe such a leak was possible. The firmware was live on the internet, protected only through obscured URL. That means, when the URLs were leaked, anyone could access the firmware. No VPN, login credentials, or other security checks required.

It's absolutely the fault of the leaker but my guess is that the days of security through obscurity are done and Apple locks down the firmware delivery process asap.

Same with the HomePod firmware leak from last month. That leak wasn't malicious. It was the result of a mistake, at least at first. Someone copied an un-flagged version of the file to a public rather than a private directory.

It's not at all hard to believe that mistakes happen. It's still hard to believe that those kinds of mistakes can happen, though.

My guess is that Apple locks down that process asap as well, with both digital and human checks and safeguards.

I'm sure most people at Apple are too apoplectic to look for it right now, but if there's a silver lining for them in all this, that's it. Legacy has hellacious inertia and old processes don't die easily. Often, people are too busy to even stop and think about improving things that currently get the job done, even if imperfectly.

Then something like this happens, and top to bottom, everyone's will becomes bent on making sure it doesn't happen again.

AMBER Alerts on your iPhone: What they are and how to manage them

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Your iPhone makes sure you never miss AMBER and other kinds of emergency government alerts.

In the United States, AMBER — America's Missing: Broadcasting Emergency Response — and other kinds of emergency government alerts are relayed to your iPhone using the same Notification Center system as your other iPhone alerts, like iMessage and Calendar.

Depending on the nature of the alert, which can include child abductions and impending natural disasters, it's a great feature that can prevent injury and save lives. Many lives. So, by their nature, these alerts don't respect Do Not Disturb settings. They NEED to get through.

That can be shocking, however, especially if they happen when you're sleeping, driving, or otherwise not expecting a loud noise to come from your iPhone. That's why, ultimately, AMBER and other alerts work at your discretion.

How to control AMBER and Government Alerts on your iPhone

  1. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone.
  2. Tap on Notification Center and scroll all the way to the bottom.
  3. Under the Government Alerts section, toggle the AMBER Alerts or Government Alerts option on or off to enable or disable them.

Turning off AMBER and other alerts can cost lives, including yours. If a natural disaster is coming your way, and you don't know about it, you have no way to save your life or the life of your family.

That why they're loud and shocking. They're meant to get your attention, instantly — and big, loud, and noisy is the way to do that.

So, while you can disable them, you shouldn't. Not unless you have some other way to be reliably alerted about emergencies.

If you received an AMBER or other emergency alert on your iPhone, what did you think of it? Was it helpful? Was it scary? Are you leaving them turned on? Let me know in the comments!

iPhone X may pack a 6-core processor

Posted on by Jon Fingas.
Categories: Uncategorized.

This weekend's huge iOS 11 leak continues to spill the beans on the iPhone X... and the latest tidbits may be particularly relevant to performance junkies. Twitter user Longhorn has found that the processor in the iPhone X, and likely the step-down iPhone 8 models, will be a six-core chip. It's not clear how many of these will be higher-powered cores versus energy-saving secondary cores (Longhorn suspects only two are high-speed cores), but it looks as if they might all be usable at the same time. That would be a big step up from the A10 Fusion in the iPhone 7, which only allows the high- or low-speed cores to run at any given moment.

Via: 9to5Mac

Source: Longhorn (Twitter 1), (2)

iPhone 8 rumor roundup: Everything you need to know

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

When is iPhone 8 being released? What will the specs be? Will it have special features? Here's everything we know!

iPhone 8 — iPhone X — whatever Apple ends up calling the currently code-named D22 iPhone, it's expected next fall, and with a new design and new set of features. But what will they be? This article is continuously updated to include the latest news and rumors. Bookmark it, save it, share it, and check back often!

September 10, 2017: iPhone X sports 6 cores, plus wireless charging!

As news unfolds about the leak of the Gold Master (GM) of iOS 11 coming from a supposed disgruntled employee at Apple, so does more insight into what's to come in the iPhone X. Today, developer Steven Troughton-Smith posted on Twitter that the new flagship iPhone will have six (yes, six) cores. "A11 Fusion is a 4+2 core device."

Troughton-Smith had retweeted another revelation from Twitter user Longhorn, who further described the A11 as having "4 Mistral cores and two Monsoon cores."

This suggests that the six-core processor coming in the iPhone X is going to be the most powerful phone ever.

Additionally, developer Guilherme Rambo uncovered more evidence that Apple is working on wireless charging, though there is no indication that it will show up in the next generation of iPhone.

September 9, 2017: Face ID setup for iPhone X revealed

The now-infamous supposed iOS 11 Gold Master (GM) leak has produced some more details about what Face ID will be like on the special edition iPhone (now referred to as iPhone X). Developer Guilherme Rambo showed off screenshots, and even a video, of the set up process for Face ID.

Similar to Touch ID, you'll be able to use Face ID to unlock your iPhone and to make purchases on iTunes and the App Store. You'll also be able to us Face ID to access your personal data autofilling information in Safari.

In order to capture the different angles of your face, Face ID set up includes a visual scan wherein you must move your face around in order to fill the circle provided. This is similar to touching the screen multiple times with Touch ID to get a wider range of your fingerprint.

September 9, 2017: Possible official names for the new iPhone line-up revealed

Developer Steven Troughton-Smith added to the bombardment of revelations coming from a supposed iOS 11 Gold Master (GM) leak with information suggesting what the new lineup of iPhones coming this Tuesday will be.

  • iPhone 8
  • iPhone 8 Plus
  • iPhone X

This breaks with Apple's years-long tradition of rolling out iPhones with the S sub-name every other year. The real question is whether we're calling that special edition version the iPhone "ex" or the iPhone ten.

September 9, 2017: iPhone 8 to be all-black up front, come with new light transmission/receiver sensors

KGI Securities supply chain savant, Ming Chi Kuo, has issued another update to client. This one details the analyst's predictions on iPhone 8 faceplate color, and the new sensors found on the "notch".

From 9to5Mac:

The structured light transmitter module is made of about 6 components from what looks like 10 different vendors. These include: active alignment equipment, filter, wafer level optical, diffractive optical element, VCSEL, and a epitaxial wafer.

The structured light receiver module includes four components from about half a dozen vendors: an IR lens, filter, CIS, and CMOS image sensor (1.4MP).

Kuo also claims all the faceplates this year will be black.

September 8, 2017: iOS 11 GM firmware leaks Portrait Lighting, Face ID, animated emoji, more

A leaked version of the iOS 11 GM (Gold Master) firmware, expected to be released at the Apple Event on September 12, seems to have revealed several major features coming to the next iPhone:

9to5Mac:

  • Portrait Lighting, which we believe will launch in beta similar to Portrait mode last year, supports Contour Light, Natural Light, Stage Light, Stage Light Mono, and Studio Light.
  • True Tone Display for white balancing like the iPad Pro lineup
  • Video tutorial for setting up the Face ID feature
  • Something referenced as Jellyfish that appears to be 3D, animated versions of emoji characters for iMessage.
  • Revised version of AirPods [with the] charging indicator light is relocated from inside the case to the front of the case
  • [New wallpapers] include several renditions of the Apple six color retro logo, along with six new flower wallpapers, and three new space wallpapers.
  • All-black wallpaper fit for OLED displays

Also:

September 7, 2017: iPhone 8 could face constrained launch thanks to early production issues

A report from The Wall Street Journal claims that early issues may have set the production timetable for the iPhone 8 back by about a month, leading to a severely constrained supply of the top-of-the-line phone when it launches, supposedly on September 22.

The production glitches led to a setback of about a month in the manufacturing timetable. Foxconn Technology Group, the Apple contractor that assembles iPhones, has been ramping up production at its manufacturing complex in Zhengzhou, China. The company is paying bonuses to employees who can help bring new hires on board at its Zhengzhou plant, which Foxconn said in June employs about 250,000 people.

Another report, this time from Macotakara reports that the phone, which it refers to as the iPhone 8 Edition, will be available for pre-order at the same time as Apple's other iPhones, but won't start shipping until October.

August 30, 2017: A new rumor on how the virtual home button might work

Mark Gurman at Bloomberg has updated his report on the iPhone 8 with reports on how the device's new virtual Home button — more a Home "bar", really — might work, along with more information about the iPhone's potential screen notch:

Across the bottom of the screen there's a thin, software bar in lieu of the home button. A user can drag it up to the middle of the screen to open the phone. When inside an app, a similar gesture starts multitasking. From here, users can continue to flick upwards to close the app and go back to the home screen. An animation in testing sucks the app back into its icon. The multitasking interface has been redesigned to appear like a series of standalone cards that can be swiped through, versus the stack of cards on current iPhones, the images show.

From the description, the Home button sounds more like a redesigned Dock, a la the iPad UI in iOS 11. On one hand, this change could definitely have advantages: You can put more functionality into the Home area, for one, and it unifies the multitasking gestures with that of the iPad. But MacStories' Federico Viticci makes a great point on Twitter:

Presumably, if this Dock replacement comes to pass, Apple has a solution for summoning Siri and returning to the Home screen (beyond voice-activation, which isn't always useful).

Developer Steve-Troughton Smith (with a design assist from Olivier Charavel) also speculated what the UI might look like on such a phone:

According to the latest reports, we'll see definitively what Apple's planning on September 12. In the meantime, got speculation on why Apple might go with a virtual Home button? Drop it in the comments.

August 24, 2017: A possible look at the iPhone 7s logic board, A11 chip; iPhone 8 reportedly starts at $999

The New York Times reports that the iPhone 8 will launch with a starting price of $999. The Times also reaffirmed previous reports that the phone would feature an all-screen front and wireless charging support.

Chief among the changes for the new iPhones: refreshed versions, including a premium model priced at around $999, according to people briefed on the product, who asked to remain anonymous because they were not authorized to speak publicly. Apple made room for a bigger screen on that model by reducing the size of the bezel — or the forehead and the chin — on the face of the device. Other new features include facial recognition for unlocking the device, along with the ability to charge it with magnetic induction, the people said.

On the iPhone 7s side of things, leaker Benjamin Geskin has posted photos of what is claimed to be the logic board for the iPhone 7s, as well as the A11 system-on-a-chip.

August 23, 2017: Could the iPhone 8 have Touch ID after all?

A video, originally posted to Chinese social network Weibo, that seems to show an iPhone 8 going through a Touch ID verification test, despite previous reports that the iPhone 8 would lack Touch ID, the video appears to show a factory worker testing the authentication method as if it were embedded inside the device's Apple logo. Of course, take this particular report with a huge grain of salt.

August 22, 2017: iPhone 8's 'Face ID' could let you unlock your phone in milliseconds; September 12 announcement rumored

A new report from Bloomberg claims that the iPhone 8's rumored facial recognition feature could prove to be a worthy replacement for Touch ID for many, with the feature reportedly able to unlock the phone within milliseconds.

The next iPhone will seamlessly mesh screen and charging technologies invented by others with such Apple innovations as a 3-D face scanner that unlocks the phone in a few hundred milliseconds.

Additionally, a new report from Mac4Ever (in French) claims that the Apple will announce its new iPhones on September 12.

What will the next iPhone be called?

If Apple sticks to the same pattern the company has been using since 2010, the 2016 iPhone 7 will be followed by the 2017 iPhone 7s, but given that 2017 is the iPhone's 10th anniversary, we may get something entirely different. iPhone 8? iPhone Edition? iPhone X?!

  • iPhone: 2007
  • iPhone 3G: 2008
  • iPhone 3GS: 2009
  • iPhone 4: 2010
  • iPhone 4s: 2011
  • iPhone 5: 2012
  • iPhone 5s: 2013
  • iPhone 6: 2014
  • iPhone 6s: 2015
  • iPhone 7: 2016

Any pattern can be broken, of course, and Apple can ultimately call any iPhone anything the company wants — iPhone Pro, Apple Phone, etc.

Because it's rumored to be an all new design, it's possible Apple will skip iPhone 7s and go straight to iPhone 8. Because it'll be 10 years since the first iPhone was introduced, Apple could also call it iPhone X.

According to Macotakara, the phone currently thought of as the iPhone 8 may in fact be given the name of "iPhone Edition". The phone could also be arriving later than the rumored iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus, though all three phones would apparently be introduced at the same event.

For the sake of simplicity, iPhone 8 will be used in our rumor roundup until we hear otherwise.

Will there be an iPhone 8 Plus?

Probably not. There was an iPhone 6 and an iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, and iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus.

  • iPhone 6 Plus: 2014
  • iPhone 6s Plus: 2015
  • iPhone 7 Plus: 2016

But iPhone 8 is getting a new design where the display can be iPhone Plus sized while the casing around it remains iPhone regular size.

Rumor has it, though, there'll still be iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus alongside iPhone 8 (singular).

When will the iPhone 8 be released?

Update: Despite previous rumors of severe delays, a new report (via Digitimes) claims that after a September introduction, all three of Apple's rumored new phones for 2017, including the iPhone 8, will launch in October. While that would indeed be later than previous years, it is said that actual production of devices will happen on schedule.

Since the iPhone 5, Apple has announced every new iPhone during a special event held the first or second Tuesday or Wednesday of September.

  • iPhone 5: September 12, 2012
  • iPhone 5s: September 10, 2013
  • iPhone 6: September 9, 2014
  • iPhone 6s: September 9, 2015
  • iPhone 7: September 7, 2016

Likewise, since the iPhone 5, Apple has shipped every new iPhone the second Friday following the event, with the exception of the iPhone 6s in 2015, which shipped the third Friday following the event:

  • iPhone 5: September 21, 2012
  • iPhone 5S: September 20, 2013
  • iPhone 6: September 19, 2014
  • iPhone 6s: September 25, 2015
  • iPhone 7: September 16, 2016

Past patterns are the best indicator of future events, but they aren't perfect. Apple can and will throw curveballs whenever the company's logistics or strategy demands. So, be aware of the dates but don't be bound to them.

Drexel Hamilton analyst Brian White (via MacRumors) claims that while pre-orders for all three of Apple's rumored 2017 iPhones (iPhone 7s, iPhone 7s Plus, and iPhone 8) will all begin in September, the iPhone 8 may not ship until "several weeks" later due to issues with its 3D sensor technology.

Analyst Timothy Arcuri of Cowen and Company contradicts White's report with his own investigation (as reported by AppleInsider), believing that it's not 3D sensor issues to blame, but low Touch ID yields:

For the 5.8-inch OLED version, the biggest bottleneck remains integrating an under-glass fingerprint sensor into the display— the current yield rate of Apple's in-house AuthenTec solution remains low and AAPL seems unwilling to use other vendors' products.

Arcuri theorizes that Apple could avoid delays entirely by ditching Touch ID entirely in lieu of facial recognition (not likely) or move the fingerprint scanner to the rear of the casing, but Apple will most likely just accept the delay and move forward with small quantities (a la the AirPods and Apple Pencil). This isn't entirely unusual for the high-end iPhone model, either: Apple's Jet Black iPhone 7 was under severe shipping constraints when it first launched, as well.

KGI Securities' Ming-Chi Kuo (via 9to5Mac), believes iPhone 8 will prove difficult enough to manufacture that we won't see it, even in constrained quantities, until October or November 2017:

KGI blames several 'significant hardware upgrades' in the iPhone 8 for the delays. This includes a custom OLED display panel, a custom Apple A11 10-nanometer SoC, an all-new designed 3D Touch module and 3D sensing cameras.

Kuo (via MacRumors, since doubled down on his belief iPhone 8 will be ramped up later than usual and be severely constrained at launch:

According to Kuo, who titled his note "Rising probability of worst-case scenario for iPhone shipments," production ramp-up of the iPhone 8 could be delayed to "as late as October-November," a departure from Apple's traditional August to September ramp-up period.

The result will be "severe supply shortages" that persist for "a while" after the new iPhone models are introduced in September. To be clear, Kuo continues to believe Apple will introduce the iPhone in September, but he suggests there's a strong possibility the device will be hard to come by for several months following its release.

Rumors of delays typically presage every new iPhone release and while products are sometimes constrained, like iPhone 7 Plus, none have been pushed back past the recent September launch period. (iPhone 4s, in 2011, was the last to launch in October.)

Given the incredible amount of cutting edge technology Apple plans to include in iPhone 8, however, no timeline could reasonably be considered certain.

What can we expect in the iPhone 8 design?

Update: DigiTimes, all three of Apple's rumored 2017 iPhones, the iPhone 7s, iPhone 7s Plus, and iPhone 8 will feature reinforced glass bodies with metal frames, with the iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus featuring aluminum frames, and the iPhone 8 sporting a stainless steel one. The iPhone 8 is also the only one of the three models said to have an AMOLED display.

At any given point in time, Apple is working several years ahead on the iPhone line. Upcoming models may already be in the testing or prototype stages while future models may be little more than components attached to boards. Sometimes multiple versions will also exist, some more conservative, others more audacious. What eventually ships depends on what can reliably be produced given the limits of technology and economics. Since 2008 Apple has also followed a "tick-tock" cycle for iPhones. On the "tick" year the company unveils a new design and on the "tock" year the company takes that same design to its limits. In 2016, though, Apple broke from that pattern and released a second tock — iPhone 7.

  • iPhone 3G: 2008 — Plastic shell.
  • iPhone 4: 2010 — Antenna band and glass back.
  • iPhone 5: 2012 — 16:9 aspect ratio, chamfered edges.
  • iPhone 6: 2014 — Bigger screens, rounded edges.
  • iPhone 7: 2015 - New finishes.

Rumor has it the next big iPhone redesign will be more dramatic one, with less bezel around the sides and at the top and bottom and virtualized buttons. Other reports also say that the iPhone 8 will feature a glass front and back, with either aluminum or stainless steel around the edges of the phone. Stainless steel is said to be reserved for the more expensive models. ETNews (via MacRumors), in contrast, reports that the iPhone 8 will feature a glass casing and a "water drop design" that will harken back to the original iPhone from 2007.

Noted leaker Sonny Dickson has shown off what appears to be a possible schematic for the iPhone 8, which shows a device with a metal back and a rear-mounted Touch ID sensor. This contradicts a previous report from Bloomberg that the iPhone 8 would feature a glass front and back with a stainless steel frame.

Benjamin Geskin on Twitter (via 9to5Mac), has posted what he claims is a "dummy" mockup of iPhone 8, matching several of the rumors. Specifically, for iPhone 8 with Touch ID remaining on the front, beneath the glass.

A similar dummy model has made another appearance via 9to5Mac in a series of photos comparing its size to that of the iPhone 7 Plus, as well as a new hands-on video.

Wait, Touch ID on the back of iPhone 8... like... like... Android?

If Apple wants to remove the bottom bezel, there Touch ID sensor will have to be changed or removed to accomplish that. It sounds like Apple wants to keep Touch ID on the front but put it under the display. That would be ideal, given Apple already made the Home button virtual with iPhone 7.

Samsung had similar plans for the Galaxy S8, however, but was forced to change when it couldn't get the technology to work and put it on the back instead.

Apple might well succeed where Samsung failed, or might have to make a similar compromise. That's likely why we keep seeing multiple purported schematics for iPhone 8: the audacious version with Touch ID under the display, and the pragmatic version where it's forced onto the back.

What colors will the iPhone 8 be offered in?

So far Apple has saved the new iPhone finishes for the years absent big redesigns, save for 2017's iPhone 7 Project RED special edition.

  • iPhone 5s: 2013 — Gold.
  • iPhone 6s: 2015 — Rose gold.
  • iPhone 7: 2016 — Black and jet black.
  • iPhone 7: 2017 - (Product) RED.

That said, Apple can do anything the company wants, any time the company wants, including introducing new colors with new designs — including new casing material.

Apple Watch Series 2 being released in white ceramics sent the internet atwitter with thoughts of iPhone 8 being made out of the same material. Tougher than stainless steel, it still remains to be seen if it would hold up in a device as big as an iPhone or iPhone Plus.

Notably, Greg Koenig of Luma Labs thinks it unlikely, writing on Atomic Delights:

More bluntly, not only is Apple not using any new ceramics manufacturing technology in the new Watch Edition, they are not even utilizing the primary patent the original Quora article pins most of its extrapolations on - that patent described a vacuum liquid slurry casting process for ceramics. The Edition watch uses a very common pressed powder forming method.

In short, not only does the ceramic Watch quash any hopes of a ceramic iPhone, I think it actually indicates that Apple isn't chasing down ceramics for iPhone production any time on the horizon.

What specs will the iPhone 8 have?

Update: A Goldman Sachs analyst note (via MacRumors) claims that Apple will release the iPhone 8 in 128GB and 256GB variations for $999 and $1,099, respectively.

Since Apple introduced the company's first branded system-on-a-chip (SoC) in 2010, every new iPhone has come with a new A-series chipset. If Apple sticks to that pattern, the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus will ship with Apple A11 processors. New SoC typically take advantage of better processes that let them be faster and more powerful but also more energy efficient.

Apple has also been adding coprocessors to handle motion voice activation, and now big.LITTLE fusion. A11 could further build on those capabilities as well, including implementing artificial intelligence and machine learning at the silicon level.

The custom CPUs Apple has been producing have gone from Swift to Cyclone to Typhoon to Twister, so... Tropical Storm next? Hurricane? Rumors also persist that Apple is working on custom GPUs and even modems as well, which would allow the company to take full control of everything from graphics to radios. Recent reports indicate that Intel will be supplying at least some of the modems for this year's iPhone lineup.

What about an iPad Pro-style Smart Connector?

Apple typically introduces a technology in one device and then rolls it out across the lineup. Retina was like that with iPhone 4 and Touch ID with iPhone 5s. The Smart Connector, which debuted with the iPad Pro in the fall of 2015, attaches via a magnet and runs power, data, and ground directly from the device. It currently powers Apple's Smart Keyboard and a similar keyboard from Logitech, with more expected to follow.

Apple could certainly engineer a Smart Connector for iPhone 8, but what it would be used for is a more interesting question. Apple made a smaller Smart Keyboard for the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, but would the company make an even smaller one for iPhone 8 Plus? For iPhone 8 standard?

According to The Verifier, the iPhone 8 will feature a Smart Connector, which it will apparently use both for charging and for augmented and virtual reality features.

What about the display? More HD? TrueTone?

Apple hasn't updated the resolution on iPhone or iPhone Plus since 2014. As such, it makes them less than desirable for applications like VR, and less than competitive when it comes to spec comparisons. It does make them more energy efficient, though, given they still use LCD rather than OLED panels.

There have been rumors that we could see a bump to 1920 x 1080 for the 4.7-inch model and 2560 x 1440 for the 5.5-inch model.

There have also been rumors about OLED, but right now the LED component of the LCD system is used to implement the pressure-sensitive 3D Touch system, so would Apple re-engineer that? Or would they simply skip ahead again to something like quantum dot?

According to The Korea Herald, any and all OLED versions will be curved and made of plastic, rather than the glass typically used on flat panels.

Also, while iPhone 7 got the DCI-P3 wide gamut color system of the 9.7-inch iPad Pro, it didn't get the True Tone system. True Tone employs two ambient light sensors, with four channels each, to measure the color temperate of the surrounding area and then match the display to that temperature. Investment bank Barclays (via MacRumors) believes that Apple's next iPhone will feature True Tone displays, however.

Will the iPhone 8 be waterproof?

iPhone 7 is water resistant but not water proof. Rated IP67, it can survive accidental splashes, dunks, and floods, but isn't rated as highly as some competing phones from Samsung and others.

Although swimming with an iPhone may not be on everyone's wish-list, those whose jobs or pastimes expose them to the elements, and even those who want to do underwater photography at shallow depths would be thrilled by IP68, and a new report from The Korea Herald claims that the iPhone 8 will feature just that.

Will the iPhone 8 have wireless charging?

Update: A new report from Nikkei Asian Review reports that one of Apple's iPhone assembly partners, Wistron, is claiming that at least one of Apple's 2017 iPhones will feature better water resistance, as well as wireless charging.

Up until mid-2015, it hadn't been possible to do wireless charging—also known as inductive charging—on a phone with a metal back. Since Apple switched from the glass of the iPhone 4 and iPhone 4s to the aluminum of the iPhone 5 and later models, that effectively meant the company couldn't offer wireless charging as well.

Now methods for induction through metal are being introduced, which means it's possible Apple could keep the aluminum back and offer wireless charging. A report from KGI's Ming-Chi Kuo (via 9to5Mac) claims that all rumored 2017 iPhones will feature wireless charging; the iPhone 8 will also apparently have a thin sheet of graphite to protect its new 3D Touch sensor from the heat generated by wireless charging.

Recent rumors have also suggested Apple is working on resonant inductive coupling, which would let devices charge even at a distance. (The greater the distance, the lower the efficiency.) Such technology is likely a year or more away, though.

Okay, what do we know for sure?

Only that nothing is confirmed until an Apple executive holds an iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus up on stage!

<!--*/ <!--*/ img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/
*/

How to find locations and get directions with Maps on iPhone and iPad

Posted on by Serenity Caldwell.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you search for locations and get turn-by-turn navigation on your iPhone? With Maps, of course!

As a Los Angeles native, I grew up with the Thomas Guide — a gigantic, encyclopedia-sized street-level map that helped you navigate the often-confusing and strange freeways of the LA Basin. It was pretty much a given that when you turned sixteen, your most prized birthday gift would be that Guide — otherwise, you couldn't find your way around!

But times have changed: Instead of the Thomas Guide, sixteen year olds have an iPhone to guide their way through city streets and subway lines. And instead of numbered paper sections, we have live traffic information and trip tracking in the form of Apple's Maps app. 

The company's app is built right into your iPhone or iPad. All you have to do is look! Here's how to use the Maps app to find your location and get directions.

How to view and share your current location

When you first launch the Maps app, you'll be greeted with a 2D beige line map, a blue indicator circle, and a search bar at the bottom. That blue indicator notes your current location as tracked by GPS and Wi-Fi-based Assisted GPS — as you travel, you'll see a pulsing blue circle around it, along with an arrow that displays the direction your iPhone is facing.

How to bring up your your current location

If this location indicator disappears or you decide to pan elsewhere on the virtual map tiles, you still can return to your location at any time with the tap of a button. Here's how!

  • In Maps, tap the arrow outline button in the upper right corner to lock the app on your current location. The arrow will fill to a solid blue.
  • Tap the arrow again (or tap it twice) to change the arrow to a solid forward-facing symbol: This locks your location into Compass lock, and orients the map in the direction you're facing, rather than in traditional North/South form.
  • To release the location lock, tap the arrow once more to return it to outline status (or, if in Compass lock, you can additionally tap the Compass icon below the arrow to return to a simple location lock).

How to mark your current location

Want to save the location where you're standing for future travels, or make sure your favorite pizza place shows up on the map the next time you're looking for great grub? You can use Maps's Mark buttons to add pins and even save places permanently as favorites.

To mark your current location, do the following:

  1. In Maps, tap the info button (looks like an i) in the upper right corner of the screen.
  2. In the resulting popover, select Mark My Location. A red pin will appear on your map.
  3. The resulting pin displays the current location along with latitude and longitude; swipe the popover up from the bottom to access buttons for adding the location to your favorites permanently, adding it to a Contact card, or removing the marker (if you decide you no longer need it).

Alternatively, you can tap on your location indicator to mark your current location, or tap and hold anywhere on the map tile to drop a pin.

How to share your current location

Whether you're meeting for lunch or letting your family know where you are in a theme park, you can use Maps's Share Location option to send a mini-map of your current whereabouts to whomever you choose.

  1. In Maps, tap the arrow outline button in the upper right corner to lock the app on your current location. The arrow will fill to a solid blue.
  2. Tap your location indicator. Your contact picture should appear above it in a tiny bubble.
  3. In the popover that results, tap the Share My Location button.
  4. Choose how to share: via AirDrop, Messages, Mail, Reminders, or other services.

How to change your map view to Transit or Satellite mode and view traffic

Apple's Maps app offers three different modes for viewing your trip: 2D/3D line maps, transit lines, or Satellite mode. By default, Map is the traditional view presented, but here's how to switch between them.

  1. In Maps, tap the info button (looks like an i) in the upper right corner of the screen.
  2. Tap on the Maps view you wish to see: Map Transit, or Satellite.
  3. Close the settings screen by tapping the X button in the upper right corner of the popover.

If you're planning your daily commute and want to avoid slow-moving traffic, you can also use Maps to show you real-time traffic conditions on major routes around the city.

  1. In Maps, tap the info button (looks like an i) in the upper right corner of the screen.
  2. Slide the Traffic switch to the On position.

You'll now see important traffic conditions marked on the map — orange and red lines represent moderate and heavy traffic, respectively. Maps also includes markers detailing the cause of the slowdown, whether it's construction, road closures, or a major accident; you can tap each icon to see more details.

How to browse or search for a location

Whether you know your destination, need to revisit a prior destination, or want to poke around your neighborhood, Maps has an option for you.

How to browse options around your current location

  1. In the Maps app, tap on the search bar; on the iPhone, it will slide up to fill the screen.
  2. Right below the search bar, Maps offers Smart Suggestions in categories like Food, Drinks, Shopping, Travel, Services, Fun, Health, and Transportation. You can tap on any category to get a list of popular options in that category, as well as seven sub-categories. (For instance, Food includes the sub-categories Popular, Restaurants, Groceries, Fast Food, Coffee Shops, Bakeries, and Desserts.)
  3. Tap the location you wish to view on the map.

How to search through previous locations and smart suggestions

  1. In the Maps app, swipe up on the bottom search bar (where the dark grey swipe handle appears).
  2. Depending on the severity of your swipe, you'll either see a partial or full list of previous directions, searches, a few restaurant suggestions, and at the bottom, your Favorites list.
  3. Tap on the location you wish to view on the map, or an old set of directions you wish to re-load.

How to search for a specific location

Already have an address in mind? Here's how you find it on the map.

  1. In the Maps app, tap on the search bar; on the iPhone, it will slide up to fill the screen.
  2. Type the address of the location you wish to find.
  3. The point of interest will appear on the map.

You can also find locations via Siri:

  1. Press the Home button or trigger Hey Siri.
  2. Ask Siri to "Show me [location]".
  3. Enter your passcode or fingerprint (if asked)

How to take a Flyover tour of a famous city

If you're viewing certain cities (Maps currently offers over 250 locations around the world), you may see a tiny "3D" notation next to their names. This indicates that Apple has created a fully-dimensional Flyover map of the city from the air that highlights local architecture and attractions. You can view these at any time.

  1. In Maps, locate the city you'd like to virtually visit with a Flyover tour.
  2. Tap on the 3D icon next to the city's name.
  3. Select the Flyover Tour button.
  4. You can end the tour at any point by tapping the End button.

Now you're all set to enjoy a sweeping, cinematic tour. While the tour takes you around the city automatically, you're also free to zoom in and rotate the screen at any point during the Flyover. Once you're finished taking a closer look, the guided tour will resume. You can end it at any time by pressing the End button.

How to request directions

Once you've found the place you wish to visit, let the Maps app help you get there.

  1. In the Maps app, tap on the search bar to enter your query or select a previous route/point of interest.
  2. A pin will appear in the map with a brief information card that details the name, location, price, and average Yelp review rating. Tap the blue Directions button below that to enter into the Directions screen.

How to select a route in Maps on iPhone and iPad

Once you've asked for directions, Maps often gives you several options for visiting your destination, and recommends one for the fastest travel. If you're interested in taking another route, however, you can choose it, instead.

  1. With the Directions screen open on your iPhone or iPad, scroll up on the info pane to view all available routes, along with the option of how you'd like to navigate: by car, walking, transit, or ride-share.

    TIP: You can further customize these routes in Maps by choosing Avoid Tolls or Avoid Highways under driving options, or what transit types to search for under the transit options button at the bottom of the info pane.

  2. Once you've decided upon the route of your choice, tap the green Go button next to the entry.

How to change your directions options from driving to walking, transit, or ride-share options

Maps isn't just for driving directions: You can also get walking directions, transit directions (for buses, subway and light rail, commuter rail, and the ferry where available), and ride-share options (where available).

  1. With the Directions screen open on your iPhone or iPad, scroll up on the info pane to view all available routes, along with the option of how you'd like to navigate: by car, walking, transit, or ride-share.
  2. Tap on Drive, Walk, Transit, or Ride to look at various options for your journey. You can preview journeys on the map by tapping on any entry, and tapping again to view a detailed step-by-step list as well as a button to Share your itinerary.
  3. When you're ready to pick an option, tap the green Go button next to the entry of your choice.

Apple Maps transit direction availability

How to change your starting location point and time

By default, Maps starts its directions from your current location immediately, but you can tell the app to create a different itinerary.

  1. With the Directions screen open on your iPhone or iPad, scroll up on the info pane to view all available routes.
  2. To change your starting location or swap the origin and destination, tap From My Location.
  3. If you're viewing Transit directions, you can also tap the Leaving Soon field next to your current location to set a time to leave or arrive by.

How to master turn-by-turn directions

The Maps app in offers more options inside the directions screen than ever before without cluttering up its interface. When you first launch a set of directions, the Maps app will transition into a big picture of your current starting point on the map along with initial written instructions at the top.

Along the bottom of the screen, you have your estimated time of arrival, how long it will take you to drive, overall mileage, and a big red End button to close the directions screen.

You can pinch on the map to zoom in or out on your route at any time, but there are also a number of additional features you can access while in directions mode. Here's what they are.

How to add or remove a stop on your route

Need gas or a quick coffee on your route while you drive? Maps offers easy-to-press buttons to quickly search for the nearest available gas stations, food options, and coffee while you're on the road.

  1. In Maps's directions mode, swipe up on the bottom toolbar to reveal additional options.
  2. Tap the Gas Stations, Restaurants/Fast Food, or Coffee buttons to view options along your route.
  3. You can scroll through the pop-over to view places along with their additional route time. To choose a stop on your route, just tap the green Go button and the stop will be immediately added.
  4. Decided to skip that location after all? You can remove the stop at any time by tapping the blue Resume Route To banner at the top of the screen.

How to view your full route on the map or in text form

Want to get a birds' eye view of your route? Use the Overview button.

  1. In Maps's directions mode, swipe up on the bottom toolbar to reveal additional options.
  2. Tap the Overview button. Your map area will zoom out to reveal your full trip.
  3. To return to the turn-by-turn map screen, swipe up on the bottom toolbar and press Resume.

If you instead want to see your full route as turn-by-turn text directions, you can do that, too.

  1. In Maps's directions mode, swipe up on the bottom toolbar to reveal additional options.
  2. Tap the Details button to reveal the full list of directions.
  3. To return to the turn-by-turn map screen, tap the Done button.

How to change the guidance volume for your directions

Want Maps's voice-based guidance system to either pipe up or sit down? You can easily access those controls on the fly.

  1. In Maps's directions mode, swipe up on the bottom toolbar to reveal additional options.
  2. Tap on the Audio button.
  3. Under the Navigation Voice preferences, choose which you prefer: No Voice, Low Volume, Normal Volume, Loud Volume. If you've chosen an audible directions option, you can also decide whether to pause spoken audio (like podcasts or audiobooks) when the Maps app's voice interjects.

How to end turn-by-turn navigation

When you complete your navigation, the Maps app will announce your arrival and automatically end its directions, returning you to the general map screen. If you want to close your iPhone or iPad's directions earlier, however, you need only press the big red End button, followed by the End Route confirmation.

Questions about Maps?

Let us know in the comments!

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What Will Apple Launch at the September 12 Event?

Posted on by Rohan Naravane.
Categories: Uncategorized.
This year’s iPhone launch event is turning out to be as exciting as the original launch event from 2007. Apple’s iconic, money-making product is going through a revolutionary change. The iPhone people have known and loved for the past decade may have gotten several features; but certain aspects of the device have remained the same. For example, the Home button has been central to navigating an iPhone since the first iteration. The tenth-anniversary iPhone boldly is going to change that familiarity, along with other never-seen-before features. Continue reading

Apple Watch Series 3 Rumor Roundup: Everything You Need to Know

Posted on by Rajesh Pandey.
Categories: Uncategorized.
In a couple of days from now, Apple will be holding an event on September 12 at the Steve Jobs theater where it will be unveiling a trio of new iPhones and announce the release date of iOS 11. While the iPhone X will likely end up stealing the spotlight, Apple will also be launching the Apple Watch with LTE connectivity at the event. Continue reading

How to back up your Mac

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you back up your Mac locally and off-site or online so all your important photos and files stay safe and sound? Like this!

You absolutely have to back up your Mac. If you don't, one day — maybe tomorrow, maybe next week or next year — you will lose something important and irreplaceable and there will be nothing future you can do but curse at and blame past you. I don't say this to scare you. I say it to save you. Back up. Do it now. And do it like this.

Why do you need to back up?

One copy of your data is no copies at all. That's because hard drives and solid state drives (SSD) fail. They fail all the time. Two copies of your data is basically one copy, since there's a chance both could fail at the same time.

To make sure your data is safe you want to back it up in a way that minimizes the chance you could ever lose it. Realistically, that means a local back up as well as an off-site or online backup.

What's a local back up and how do you do it?

A local back up is literally taking a the data on your Mac and copying it to another drive in your home or office. Both copies are in the same place, so you can easily get to the back up when and if you need it, and either keep it up-to-date or restore from it if something bad happens to the original.

There are a couple ways to do a local backup. The first and easiest is with Apple's built-in Time Machine.

What's Time Machine and how do I use it?

Time Machine is the easiest way to get started with local back ups. Because it's built right into macOS, there's no additional software to buy, you just need an external drive to get started. Time Machine is even supported by popular mass-storage (NAS) devices, so it can scale as much as you need.

Read how to easily back up and restore your Mac with Time Machine

If you're really brand new to backups and want the simplest, most set-it-and-forget-it solution possible, you can get an Apple AirPort Time Capsule router. It's literally a Wi-Fi router with a hard drive built in.

Fair warning, the Wi-Fi router part is current-generation fast, but hasn't been updated in years and doesn't use modern networking technologies like mesh. Still, if you're not into or interested in the technology, get a Time Capsule, plug it in, hit start, and you'll be halfway there. (See online backups, below, for the other half.)

Even though I also use the other methods outline below, I have, and use, a Time Capsule as well. That way, even if I forget everything else or something else fails, I know every Mac in my house is still getting a base-level backup every few hours.

See at Apple

What about 'cloning' for local back up?

The big advantage to cloning is that it makes a bit-for-bit copy of your drive which means that, if anything happens to your Mac, you can actually boot from the clone and get right back to work if you need to, before worrying about fixing your main drive or restoring any data.

I use SuperDuper! for this and rotate between two different back up drives. That way, I minimize the chance of losing anything should one of those drives fail. Carbon Copy Cloner will get the same job done, so you have options.

Learn how to easily clone your Mac using SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner

What's off-site backup?

Having a backup or two at home is fine unless there's a fire, flood, or theft that eliminates everything in your home, all at once. Same for the office, if your Mac and backups are all in the same place there as well.

So, to reduce that risk, you take one or more of your backup drives and store them at a different physical location. It should be a place that you trust with your data and is far enough away that any disaster striking your place won't also strike the secondary place. So, not the neighbors, but your parent's or sibling's place across town, your office, even a storage unit or safety deposit box at the bank a few blocks away would all be great.

The most convenient way to manage it is, if you're already rotating between two or more local drives, simply swap the local and off-site drives once a week or once a month, depending on your needs. Take the drive with your latest local back up to the off-site location and bring back the older one to update. Then swap again the next time.

This is also the best option if you have sensitive financial, health, or personal information you simply don't want to trust to an online service no matter how secure.

What about online or cloud backup?

We live in the age of the internet and, while local and offsite backups are a good enough solution to recommend them, there are considerable advantages to going to the cloud.

Similar to Time Machine and Time Capsule, online backup "just works". You pay for a subscription, download a utility, start it up, and then it churns away in the background copying your data to giant server farms and updating it as and when needed.

There's typically also an option to send or receive hard drives, if you have a large amount of data, to get you started or in the event you need to recover.

BackBlaze and Carbonite are solid services that have been around for years.

How to back up your Mac to the cloud

What about iCloud, Dropbox, and Google Drive — can't you just use them?

If BackBlaze or Carbonite are like disk cloning in the cloud, iCloud, Dropbox, Google Drive, and the other storage providers are like copying a few important files over. They're incredibly handy to keep things in sync and to restore a few files here and there if and when you need to, but if you lose your entire Mac, unless you've stored a disk image, you won't be able to simply restore and go back about your business.

That said, most of them have free and cheap plans and are well worth using in addition to an online backup service because you can quickly and easily sync and recover files.

I use all three. iCloud automagically syncs and backups basic Mac files and lets me access them on iOS. Dropbox is where I store all my Mac document folders. Google Drive is what my company uses for documents.

Back it up. Just back it up.

Pick a date. Set a calendar reminder. Every time it goes off, check your backups and improve your strategy as needed. Even though backups always feel like tomorrow's problem, losing your data can profoundly screw up your today. And odds are it will happen at some point, so be ready.

Don't let past you destroy future you. Back up now.

If you already have a backup strategy, let me know what it is. If you don't already have one, let me know what you choose!

Updated September 2017: These are still the best ways to back up your Mac and really just sound advice.

<!--*/ <!--*/ img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

How to back up your Mac

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you back up your Mac locally and off-site or online so all your important photos and files stay safe and sound? Like this!

You absolutely have to back up your Mac. If you don't, one day — maybe tomorrow, maybe next week or next year — you will lose something important and irreplaceable and there will be nothing future you can do but curse at and blame past you. I don't say this to scare you. I say it to save you. Back up. Do it now. And do it like this.

Why do you need to back up?

One copy of your data is no copies at all. That's because hard drives and solid state drives (SSD) fail. They fail all the time. Two copies of your data is basically one copy, since there's a chance both could fail at the same time.

To make sure your data is safe you want to back it up in a way that minimizes the chance you could ever lose it. Realistically, that means a local back up as well as an off-site or online backup.

What's a local back up and how do you do it?

A local back up is literally taking a the data on your Mac and copying it to another drive in your home or office. Both copies are in the same place, so you can easily get to the back up when and if you need it, and either keep it up-to-date or restore from it if something bad happens to the original.

There are a couple ways to do a local backup. The first and easiest is with Apple's built-in Time Machine.

What's Time Machine and how do I use it?

Time Machine is the easiest way to get started with local back ups. Because it's built right into macOS, there's no additional software to buy, you just need an external drive to get started. Time Machine is even supported by popular mass-storage (NAS) devices, so it can scale as much as you need.

Read how to easily back up and restore your Mac with Time Machine

If you're really brand new to backups and want the simplest, most set-it-and-forget-it solution possible, you can get an Apple AirPort Time Capsule router. It's literally a Wi-Fi router with a hard drive built in.

Fair warning, the Wi-Fi router part is current-generation fast, but hasn't been updated in years and doesn't use modern networking technologies like mesh. Still, if you're not into or interested in the technology, get a Time Capsule, plug it in, hit start, and you'll be halfway there. (See online backups, below, for the other half.)

Even though I also use the other methods outline below, I have, and use, a Time Capsule as well. That way, even if I forget everything else or something else fails, I know every Mac in my house is still getting a base-level backup every few hours.

See at Apple

What about 'cloning' for local back up?

The big advantage to cloning is that it makes a bit-for-bit copy of your drive which means that, if anything happens to your Mac, you can actually boot from the clone and get right back to work if you need to, before worrying about fixing your main drive or restoring any data.

I use SuperDuper! for this and rotate between two different back up drives. That way, I minimize the chance of losing anything should one of those drives fail. Carbon Copy Cloner will get the same job done, so you have options.

Learn how to easily clone your Mac using SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner

What's off-site backup?

Having a backup or two at home is fine unless there's a fire, flood, or theft that eliminates everything in your home, all at once. Same for the office, if your Mac and backups are all in the same place there as well.

So, to reduce that risk, you take one or more of your backup drives and store them at a different physical location. It should be a place that you trust with your data and is far enough away that any disaster striking your place won't also strike the secondary place. So, not the neighbors, but your parent's or sibling's place across town, your office, even a storage unit or safety deposit box at the bank a few blocks away would all be great.

The most convenient way to manage it is, if you're already rotating between two or more local drives, simply swap the local and off-site drives once a week or once a month, depending on your needs. Take the drive with your latest local back up to the off-site location and bring back the older one to update. Then swap again the next time.

This is also the best option if you have sensitive financial, health, or personal information you simply don't want to trust to an online service no matter how secure.

What about online or cloud backup?

We live in the age of the internet and, while local and offsite backups are a good enough solution to recommend them, there are considerable advantages to going to the cloud.

Similar to Time Machine and Time Capsule, online backup "just works". You pay for a subscription, download a utility, start it up, and then it churns away in the background copying your data to giant server farms and updating it as and when needed.

There's typically also an option to send or receive hard drives, if you have a large amount of data, to get you started or in the event you need to recover.

BackBlaze and Carbonite are solid services that have been around for years.

How to back up your Mac to the cloud

What about iCloud, Dropbox, and Google Drive — can't you just use them?

If BackBlaze or Carbonite are like disk cloning in the cloud, iCloud, Dropbox, Google Drive, and the other storage providers are like copying a few important files over. They're incredibly handy to keep things in sync and to restore a few files here and there if and when you need to, but if you lose your entire Mac, unless you've stored a disk image, you won't be able to simply restore and go back about your business.

That said, most of them have free and cheap plans and are well worth using in addition to an online backup service because you can quickly and easily sync and recover files.

I use all three. iCloud automagically syncs and backups basic Mac files and lets me access them on iOS. Dropbox is where I store all my Mac document folders. Google Drive is what my company uses for documents.

Back it up. Just back it up.

Pick a date. Set a calendar reminder. Every time it goes off, check your backups and improve your strategy as needed. Even though backups always feel like tomorrow's problem, losing your data can profoundly screw up your today. And odds are it will happen at some point, so be ready.

Don't let past you destroy future you. Back up now.

If you already have a backup strategy, let me know what it is. If you don't already have one, let me know what you choose!

Updated September 2017: These are still the best ways to back up your Mac and really just sound advice.

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How to report a problem in Maps on iPhone and iPad

Posted on by Luke Filipowicz.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you send Apple corrections for bad Maps? From right within Maps!

Maps require eternal vigilance. It's a big world out there filled with tiny, sometimes changing places, and if you find anything wrong with any of them, you can let Apple know. That way, if something is missing, misplaced, or simply moved, you can submit newer, better information and Maps can update for everyone!

Keep in mind that your report may be in vain, but it's still worth it to try.

What kind of issues you can report in Maps.

You can report a variety of issues in Maps; here's a list of all your options:

  • Map Labels
  • Search
  • Navigation
  • Transit
  • Image Quality
  • Add a Place
  • Home address
  • Work address
  • Other Issue

How to report an issue in Maps on iPhone and iPad

  1. Launch Maps from the Home screen.
  2. Tap the Info button. It's the blue "i" in a circle.
  3. Tap Report an Issue.

  4. Tap Agree.

  5. Tap on the issue you want to report. For this example, I'll use Map Labels.
  6. Tap on a road or location you want to report.

  7. Tap Next.
  8. Enter the correct name for the label. You can also type additional comments and add a photo if you choose.
  9. Click Send.

Depending on the issue you're reporting, the process is going to be slightly different. Fortunately, Apple includes instructions along the way so you shouldn't have too much of a problem.

Apple might end up contacting you via the email address associated with your iCloud account if they have any follow-up questions regarding your report.

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below.

Updated September 2017: Made sure steps were accurate for iOS 11.

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Easily convert all your DVDs to digital with ease for only $20!

Posted on by Luke Filipowicz.
Categories: Uncategorized.

You have an iPhone in your pocket that can stream Netflix, watch live-streaming pro sports, and even download and play movies in HD in an instant — the only problem is you grew up on the cusp of the evolving digital world so you already own a bunch of your favorite movies... on DVD. Last time we checked Apple doesn't make a portable DVD drive for you iPhone, which leaves you with a giant media collection that just sits on a shelf collecting dust.

Turn all your DVDs into digital files! Learn more

The way we see it you have two options. You could bite the bullet and repurchase all your movies through iTunes so they're finally available across all your Mac devices, which means spending more money on something you have already purchased before. Or, you do the smart thing and let iMore Digital Offers help you out.

What if you could take all your DVDs and convert them to digital files you can play on your iPhone, iPad, Mac, or any other device? iMore Digital Offers can help you do just that with the MacX Media Conversion Bundle.

This bundle comes with two excellent programs to help you manage your media like never before. Rip your favorite movies right off a DVD with MacX DVD Ripper Pro and then convert that video file to the type of file you need with MacX Video Converter Pro!

This bundle would normally cost you $127.90, but right now iMore Digital Offers can get you the entire bundle for only $19.99. That's over 80% off the original price!

Don't waste money buying digital versions of movies you already own, jump on this deal right now and start enjoying all your favorites on any device you may have!

Rip and watch all your favorite DVDs digitally! Learn more

Best heavy duty cases for iPhone 7

Posted on by Luke Filipowicz.
Categories: Uncategorized.

What's the best heavy duty case for iPhone 7? Get a heavy duty case and put your mind at ease!

Breaking a brand new phone is the worst, and you don't want anything to happen to your beautiful iPhone 7. If you're prone to dropping your phone or just want to be extra safe, take a look at these great heavy duty cases.

Supcase Unicorn Beetle PRO series

The Supcase Unicorn Beetle Pro series has everything you need in a heavy duty case and will cost you about $20. A hard polycarbonate shell protects all sides and edges of the iPhone 7, and a built-in screen protector and dust covers protect the Lightning port.

The case easily snaps into a belt clip that attaches to the back of the phone. Now wearing your phone on your waist isn't everyone's cup of tea; however, the option of having easy access to your phone, right at your hip, is super useful.

It comes in a wide array of colors such as blue, green, pink, black, and white, so you should have no problem finding the perfect hue for you.

See at Amazon


Otterbox Defender series

Otterbox is a household name when it comes to heavy duty cases, and its Defender series is the toughest offered.

The Defender series has a four-layer protection system to keep your iPhone 7 safe and sound. It has a built-in screen protector to prevent your screen from being scratched, a buffer made out of foam to ensure your screen protector never rubs against the glass, an inner shock-absorbing shell that protects the rest of the phone from damage, and a hard outer slipcover that seals up the Lightning port to prevent dust and dirt from getting inside.

Otterbox rigorously tests all of their cases with drop tests and tumble tests, allowing you to rest easy knowing your iPhone 7 won't be harmed should harm befall it. That protection doesn't come cheap though, the Otterbox Defender series will cost you $50.

See at Otterbox


Spigen Slim Armor

Spigen's Slim Armor may not have a screen protector, but with the edges of the case protruding at least 2mm above the screen, it will still protect the glass on flat surfaces and from falling screen-side-down. On top of that, the camera also has lots of protection from table scratches, thanks to the high edges of the case as well.

Spigen's Slim Armor is certified military grade drop-tested. I know that sounds like some random label that a company would stick on its packaging just to sell the product, but in this case, it means something. It means that testing was conducted by a third party, and the quality is approved for use in the military.

The added feature of a metal kickstand, which allows you to prop the phone up (ideal for watching videos) is just the icing on the cake.

You can pick up a Spigen Slim Armor in a bunch aof different colors all starting around $30.

See at Amazon


UAG Monarch Feather-Light

UAG's Monarch Feather Light case for the iPhone 7 is a little lighter and less bulky than the other cases here, but nevertheless, it still offers military grade impact protection.

The Big, grippy buttons provide unobstructed access to all of the iPhone's usual functions, and the Lightning port remains open for easy use.

There's almost an unfathomable amount of colors to choose from, so whether you want something subtle or bold, you can't go wrong. It isn't the cheapest option, usually retails for about $60; however, I have seen it on sale for as low as $49, so keep your eyes peeled.

See at Amazon


Ringke Max

If you're looking for style and protection, the Ringke Max has you covered all for about $35.

Made in two parts, the Ringke Max offers you excellent shock-absorbing protection with its TPU sleeve and great scratch protection with its hard polycarbonate shell. It also has extra-protected corners, which help prevent your iPhone's screen from spider-webbing if you drop it on a corner.

An added bonus of the Ringke Max is it doesn't sacrifice style for protection. There is no beating around the bush; this case looks cool!

See at Amazon


What will you use?

Do you have a go-to heavy duty case for every iPhone that you think deserves a mention? Let us know in the comments below!

Updated September 2017: If you want the strongest protection you can find, these are still our favorite picks to prevent damage to your iPhone 7.

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How to share location and directions with Maps for iPhone and iPad

Posted on by Mike Tanasychuk.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you share your location and direction on iPhone or iPad? With Maps!

Sometimes it's not enough for you to know where you are or where you're going. Sometimes you need to let other people know. Maybe you want to share a great new coffee shop you've found, maybe you got separated at the park, or maybe you need to be picked up where your car broke down. Sure, there's Find my Friends for sharing location all the time but, when you need to share location any time, there's Maps.

How to share your location with Maps for iPhone and iPad

You can share your location using Apple's built-in Mail or Messages extensions, as well as through any apps you've installed that offer Share extensions, including Facebook, Twitter, Slack, and more.

  1. Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the current location arrow. This will take you to your location on the map, marked by a pulsating blue dot.
  3. Tap the blue dot.

  4. Tap Share My Location.
  5. Tap the extension you'd like to use to share your location.

How to add your location to Notes with Maps for iPhone and iPad

You can send locations to the Notes app in order to collect them into travel, project, or other plans.

  1. Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the current location arrow. This will take you to your location on the map, marked by a pulsating blue dot.
  3. Tap the blue dot.

  4. Tap Share My Location.
  5. Tap the add to notes extension.

How to share your location via AirDrop with Maps for iPhone and iPad

  1. Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the current location arrow. This will take you to your location on the map, marked by a pulsating blue dot.
  3. Tap the blue dot.

  4. Tap Share My Location.
  5. Tap on the Contact to whom you want to AirDrop your location.

How to share directions with Maps for iPhone and iPad

In addition to locations, you can also share full-on directions with Maps

  1. Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the search bar.
  3. Enter a address or location.
  4. Tap search.

  5. Tap directions.
  6. Tap on the route you want.
  7. Tap Share

How to open directions in third-party apps with Maps for iPhone and iPad

You can open directions via a third party app, like Google Maps, which is handy if you want something like biking directions, which Maps doesn't provide.

  1. Launch the Maps app from your Home screen.
  2. Tap the search bar.
  3. Enter a address or location.
  4. Tap search.

  5. Tap directions.
  6. Tap on the route you want.

  7. Tap Share
  8. Tap Routing Apps.

From here you can select the app you wish to use. The app will launch and directions and routes will appear. You can also use the above steps if you have another favorite third party routing app.

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below.

Updated September 2017: Made sure everything's updated for iOS 11!

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How to find your car with Siri and the Maps app on iPhone

Posted on by Serenity Caldwell.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Never lose your car to endless parking lots or twisting urban neighborhoods again with a Bluetooth connection and the Maps app.

Here's a not-so-secret fact about me: I'm awful at remembering where I parked. It's why I own a brightly-colored car that can make noise and flash its lights if I press my key fob — without them, I might as well condemn myself to wandering through darkened parking garages for hours.

Thanks to Apple's Parked Car feature in Apple Maps, though, I no longer have to rely on shiny paint or loud noises to help me discover where I left my vehicle: I only have to look at my iPhone or Apple Watch.

How the Parked Car feature works

You don't need Apple's CarPlay to get this feature: As long as your car has a Bluetooth stereo and you own an iPhone 6 or later, you should be able to use the Parked Car feature.

The feature works via Bluetooth Low-Energy pairing: When you turn off your car, it disconnects your iPhone from the car's Bluetooth connection. When that happens, your iPhone automatically makes a note of where the pairing disconnected, and plunks a Parked Car marker down in that spot.

Once you return to your car and turn it on again, your iPhone removes that marker (until the next time you turn off your vehicle).

How to turn on the Parked Car feature

The Parked Car option should be enabled by default, but just in case it's not showing for you, it's easy to manually turn it on.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Open the Maps setting.
  3. Scroll to the bottom of the screen.

  4. Make sure the Show Parked Location toggle is switched to the On position.

You'll also want to make sure Location Services and Frequent Locations are enabled.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to Privacy.
  3. Go to Location Services.
  4. Make sure location services for the Maps app have been enabled.
  5. Tap Frequent Locations under the Location Services section.

  6. Make sure the Frequent Locations toggle has been enabled.

How to find your Parked Car via Siri

You can find your car from your iPhone or Apple Watch just by asking Siri. Here's how!

  1. Trigger Siri by pressing and holding the Home button (iPhone), saying "Hey Siri" (iPhone or Apple Watch), or pressing the Digital Crown (Apple Watch).
  2. Say "Where's my car?"
  3. Tap the parked car icon to view the Parked Car screen in the Maps app.

How to find your Parked Car in the Maps app

By default, your Parked Car should be the first or second saved entry under Maps's Search bar; if it's not, you can tap the Search bar and type in "Parked Car" to view it.

Once you find your Parked Car, you can view a small Maps card that has information about its current location, a button to get directions from your location, the time you last parked there, an option to add notes about where you parked (i.e. a garage level), and an option to snap a photo of where you parked.

How to add information to your Parked Car location

  1. Tap the Parked Car marker.
  2. Tap the Note or Photo field to add textual or photographic information to your parking location.

  3. Tap the Edit Location button to alter your car's spot if the original GPS location is slightly off.

How to remove your Parked Car location

Whether you don't want Maps to show where you parked your car or your location is off enough that it doesn't make sense to have the marker, here's how to remove your location.

  1. Tap the Parked Car marker.
  2. Swipe up on the Parked Car card.
  3. Tap Remove Car.

  4. Here, you have two options: Remove Car will remove this parking instance, while Stop Showing Parked Car will remove this marker and any future Parked Car markers.

What if your car doesn't show up?

If you've confirmed that the Parked Car feature is on in Settings along with Location Services, but still can't get your car to show up on the map, you may not have a compatible Bluetooth stereo system.

Most every modern Bluetooth stereo and aftermarket system is compatible, but earlier car models may not work with the Parked Car feature.

Questions?

Let us know in the comments below.

<!--*/ <!--*/ img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

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