Pokémon Go Events: Here’s what’s next!

Posted on September 20, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Legendary Beasts Raikou, Entei, and Suicune are here, Mewtwo is on his way, and Safari Zone Europe has been updated. Read on for more!

Pokémon Go is intended to get you out and about, both on your own and with family and friends. One of the ways Pokémon Go tries to bolster activity is with events. Some of the events get splashy announcements and coincide with big public holidays. Others are quieter and more regular. Here's what's happened already and what's coming up next.

New: How to beat Legendary Raid Bosses | How to catch Legendary Raid Bosses | Best movesets for Legendary Pokémon

Starting soon: The Autumnal Equinox Event!

Running from September 22 to October 2, the Autumnal Equinox event is running alongside the Johto Legendary Beast Raids and focuses on hatching eggs! From Niantic:

While you're out exploring, be sure to visit your local PokéStops and Gyms to collect special 2 km Eggs that have the opportunity to hatch Pokémon such as Chansey, Mareep, Larvitar, and more. You'll also be able to get special boxes from the in-game shop that feature items like Lucky Eggs, Lure Modules, and all-new Super Incubators which hatch Eggs 1.5 times quicker!

This event also offers triple XP for any new Pokemon added to your Pokedex, so any raids you haven't completed yet would be significantly boosted with this temporary perk.

Current Events: Pokémon Go Legendary Beast Raids and EX-Raids starting August 31

Update: EX Raid passes have been sent out to a few people in Washington State and Californina, near the locations of Niatic's offices in those areas. Push notifications provided alerts, the passes can be seen in Items, and there's a banner that gives some extra information about them. So far they show 2 hour windows for raids.

Pokémon Go has announced that the Legendary Beasts, Raikou, Entei, Suicune will appear in Legendary Raids starting August 31. The Beasts will rotate through geographies, staying on each super-continent for roughly one month at a time over the course of three months. EX-Raids, which should feature Mewtwo, will also begin testing and, eventually, rollout over the next month.

From Pokémon Go

Starting August 31, the Legendary Pokémon Raikou, Entei, and Suicune will begin appearing in Pokémon GO. Trainers worldwide can look forward to battling these Pokémon together with friends in Raid Battles for the chance to catch the trio of Legendary Pokémon originally from the Johto region. Raikou, Entei, and Suicune will be traveling the world throughout the coming months. From August 31 to September 30, you can find these Legendary Pokémon in the following areas of the world:

  • Raikou, an Electric-type Legendary Pokémon, can be battled throughout the Americas.
  • Entei, a Fire-type Legendary Pokémon, can be battled throughout Europe and Africa.
  • Suicune, a Water-type Legendary Pokémon, can be battled throughout the Asia-Pacific region.

On September 30, all three of these Legendary Pokémon will move to a different location and will be available for Trainers to battle with friends until October 31. They will make their final stop in the last remaining location on October 31. Raikou, Entei, and Suicune will be available for this limited time period, so make sure to battle against them when they arrive at Gyms near you!

While these Legendary Pokémon are traveling the world, we'll also begin an EX Raid Battle (formerly Exclusive Raid Battle) field-testing phase at select Gyms before the feature is made available globally. We have collected some valuable early feedback on the new EX Raid Battle feature and will look to further test and hone the experience through the feedback of the dedicated global Trainer community. During the field test, we'll be making periodic adjustments to EX Raid eligibility requirements, frequency, times, locations, and durations with the goal of making the EX Raid Battle feature engaging, rewarding, and most importantly, fun for Trainers who regularly participate in Raid Battles.

The first EX Raid Passes will be sent out soon, and those invited will have an opportunity to try out the new system as early as September 6. Stay tuned for more updates as we launch the EX Raid Battle field test to more Gyms in the weeks ahead. We look forward to reading all your constructive feedback on our social media channels and encourage you to continue share your thoughts throughout the EX Raid Battle field test!

The Legendary Dog Raids are great to see. The EX Raids seem overly complicated for a game as error and bug-prone as Pokémon Go has been since, well, launch. But we'll see!

Upcoming Events: Pokémon Go Safari Zones Europe starting September 16

From Pokémon Go:

The first series of Pokémon GO Safari Zone events in Europe are just around the corner! On September 16, official Pokémon GO Safari Zone activities will be taking place at Unibail-Rodamco Shopping Centres located at CentrO in Oberhausen (Germany), Les Quatre Temps in Paris (France) and La Maquinista in Barcelona (Spain).

At each Pokémon GO Safari Zone event, Trainers will receive an in-game medal and special 2 km Eggs from the various PokéStops found at each of these shopping centers. Lures will be activated all day at each PokéStop at the event so Trainers can catch Pokémon together, including Kangaskhan, Chansey, Larvitar, and others. Trainers in the area may even spot Shiny Pikachu, Shiny Magikarp, and various forms of Unown! In order to optimize the experience for all Trainers attending, Gym and Raid Battles will not be available at these shopping centers during the events.

The Pokémon GO Safari Zone events will give Trainers the chance to meet one another and catch up in the team lounges. Attendees will also receive Trainer kits for joining the day's Pokémon-catching activities. Throughout each of the participating shopping centers, special offers for Pokémon GO Trainers will be available in select stores.

Trainers will soon be able to reserve free, nontransferable tickets to each of the Pokémon GO Safari Zone events taking place on September 16. To receive a QR Code, which is required to participate in the event, the person who claims the ticket must be over the age of 13 and be present with a valid photo ID.

In addition, Trainers who were unable to get tickets will be able to discover and catch some of the Pokémon found at the Pokémon GO Safari Zones events throughout the city where the shopping center is located. We hope everyone will get a chance to explore these amazing cities while looking for Pokémon!

Visit your local shopping center's Facebook page for information on reserving a ticket to the Pokémon GO Safari Zone events in Oberhausen, Germany; Paris, France; and Barcelona, Spain on September 16.

September 16, 2017   - CentrO—Oberhausen, Germany - Les Quatre Temps—Paris, France - La Maquinista—Barcelona, Spain

October 7, 2017

  • Fisketorvet—Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Centrum Černý Most—Prague, The Czech Republic

October 14, 2017

  • Mall of Scandinavia—Stockholm, Sweden
  • Stadshart Amstelveen—Amstelveen, The Netherlands

We'll be revealing more information on tickets for these events soon. Please visit the local shopping center's Facebook pages for updates.

Upcoming Events: Pokémon Go Nest Migration on September 6, 2017

The next Pokémon Go Nest Migration is expected to occur on Wednesday, September 6, 2017, at 8 p.m. EDT / 5 p.m. PDT.

Pokémon Go nest migrations but they've occurred every two weeks at exactly the same time for months. There's always a possibility that will change but, until it does, the nest migration is a safe bet.

What are Pokémon Go Nests and how do you find them?

2017 Pokémon Go Events: The potentials!

Based on past events, there are a few guesses we can make about future events. First, regional holidays don't mean regional events. Halloween isn't an internationally observed occasion but the event was worldwide. U.S. Thanksgiving is only celebrated in the U.S., but was likewise a worldwide event. Granted, Pokémon Go is developed by a U.S. company, but it does indicate that other regional holidays could provide the impetus for other worldwide events.

Also, Pokémon Go has multiple levers to pull. The game can increase rewards, like candy, XP, and stardust. It can decrease requirements, like walking distance. It can increase spawn rates for all or specific Pokémon, like pink colored Pokémon or water-types, and create limited edition Pokémon just for events, like Party Hat Pikachu. It can also give away items or increase their duration, like 1-use Incubators or 8-hour Lures.

Pokémon Go can have events to aid in charitable causes, like the highly localized tsunami-relief event in Japan that featured Lapras or Snorlax exclusively for a week. There was also an event simply to promote the new streaks and bonuses. So, if they want to maintain momentum and there's too long a gap between proper occasions, Pokémon Go can invent their own.

Pokémon Go type-events

So far, Pokémon Go has held the following:

  • Ghost-type event - October, 2016 (Halloween)
  • Water-type event - March, 2017 (Water Festival)
  • Grass-type event - May, 2017
  • Rock-type event - May, 2017 (Adventure Week)
  • Fire- and Ice-type event - June 2017 (Solstice)

That still leaves several type-events for Pokémon Go to run during the rest of the year:

  • Bug-type event.
  • Dark-type event.
  • Dragon-type event.
  • Electric-type event.
  • Fairy-type event.
  • Fighter-type event.
  • Flying-type event.
  • Ground-type event.
  • Normal-type event.
  • Poison-type event.
  • Psychic-type event.
  • Steel-type event.

Since Pokémon Go has shown they're not averse to combining type events, like Fire and Ice, we could see some really interesting combinations.

Repeat events

During the first year, Pokémon Go held events for Halloween, the introduction of streak bonuses, Thanksgiving, the holidays, and New Year. There's no reason to believe at least most of those events won't be repeated this year.

Check out the recaps and links below to see what the previous events offered and what may be offered again soon.

Past Pokémon Go Events

The best indicator of future behavior is past behavior. So, to look forward to the next Pokémon Go events, it's helpful to look back at the events that have already run.

Pokémon World Championships 2017

As part of the Pokémon Trading Card Game and Video Game World Championships on August 19 and 20 in Anaheim, California, Pokémon Go players in the vicinity had a chance to catch Kangaskhan — usually regional to Australia — and Unown spelling WORLDS.

European Sightings 2017

Safari Zones Europe might was drastically downscaled but Niantic made it up to players with European sightings instead. Similar to what happened with Pokémon Go Fest Chicago, an extra-continental legendary — in this case Kangaskhan — and Unown spelling out the location — in this case Europe — were being spotted.

Locations included:

  • Vienna, Austria
  • Prague, Czech Republic
  • Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Helsinki, Finland
  • Dijon, France
  • Lille, France
  • Lyon, France
  • Marseille, France
  • Nice, France
  • Paris, France
  • Rennes, France
  • Berlin, Germany
  • Bochum, Germany
  • Gera, Germany
  • Leipzig, Germany
  • Mönchengladbach, Germany
  • Munich, Germany
  • Oberhausen, Germany
  • Recklinghausen, Germany
  • Milan, Italy
  • Naples, Italy
  • Rome, Italy
  • Oslo, Norway
  • Warsaw, Poland
  • Lisbon, Portugal
  • Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Badajoz, Spain
  • Barcelona, Spain
  • Cádiz, Spain
  • Madrid, Spain
  • Sevilla, Spain
  • San Sebastián, Spain
  • Valencia, Spain
  • Valladolid, Spain
  • Stockholm, Sweden
  • Zürich, Switzerland
  • Almere, The Netherlands
  • Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Leidschendam, The Netherlands
  • Zoetermeer, The Netherlands
  • Belfast, United Kingdom
  • Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Cardiff, United Kingdom
  • Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • London, United Kingdom
  • Manchester, United Kingdom

Legendary Bird Raids: Lugia, Articuno, Moltres, and Zapdos 2017

Pokémon Go offered Legendary Raids for the three team birds, Articuno, Moltres, and Zapados, and the lead bird, Lugia, for roughly a week each at a time from mid-July until mid-August. All four birds were then made available through Legendary Raids at the same time until August 31

How to beat Lugia, Articuno, Moltres, Zapdos, and all the Legendary Raid Bosses

Pikachu Outbreak Japan 2017

As part of Pokémon's Pikachu Outbreak celebration in Japan, Pokémon Go brought Mr. Mine over for a short amount of time, increased spawns for Unown letters spelling Yokohama, added rare spawns from 2K eggs, introduced Shiny Pichu, Pikachu, and Raichu, and unleashed the very first Mewtwo Legendary Raids: with 9+ hour times, 50+ premiere balls, and... a guaranteed catch rate of 100% — at least for the event.

Pokémon Go Fest Chicago Bonus Event 2017

Following up on Pokémon Go Fest Chicago, a slew of bonuses were unlocked, including:

  • Double Stardust
  • Double Candy
  • Double XP
  • Increased Pokémon encounters
  • Reduced hatching distance
  • Reduced buddy distance

Hopefully we won't have to wait another year for that many bonuses again.

More on Pokémon Go Fest Chicago.

Pokémon Go Fest Chicago

Pokémon Go Fest Chicago was the first major real-world event for Niantic's incredibly popular augmented reality, geo-hunting game. It took place Saturday, July 22, at Grant Park in Chicago, IL, and — the servers crashed and burned.

Still, Pokémon Go made good with refunds, $100 in Poké Coins, and a Lugia for every participant, as well as a 100% catch rate for Legendary Raids around the venue.

More on Pokémon Go Fest Chicago.

Pokémon Go Anniversary Event

Pokémon Go's Anniversary Event ran from July 6 to July 24 with a special Ash-hat Pikachu for players to catch in the wild and discounted Anniversary Boxes and Special Boxes to buy in the Poké Shop. The first Box was underwhelming but the second set delivered.

Pokémon Go Solstice fire- and ice-type event

From June 13 to 21, 2017 (extended a day due to Pokémon Trainer Club (PTC) login issues, Pokémon Go held and event of Ice- and Fire in honor of the summer soultice in the north and the winter solstice in the south. In addition to extra fire- and ice-type spawns, there was 5x XP on hatching eggs, 3x XP on catching Pokémon, and 50% off Lucky Eggs in the Poké Shop.

More on thePokémon Go solstice Ice- and Fire-type event

Pokémon Go Adventure Week rock-type event

Pokémon Go had a rock-type event, called Adventure Week, from May 18 to May 25, 2017. During the event, rock-type Pokémon spawned at a higher rate, Buddy candy accrued at 4x the usual speed, Poké Balls were 50% off in the shop, and extra items were dropped at PokéStops!

More on the Pokémon Go Adventure Week Rock-type Event

PokémonGo Worldwide Bloom Event 2017 (Grass-type)

Pokémon Go held a worldwide bloom event from May 5 to May 8, 2017. During the event, grass-type Pokémon spawns were increased and Lures lasted for six hours.

More on the Pokémon Go grass event

Pokémon Go "Golden Week" Lure Event at McDonald's Japan

Pokémon Go held a Lure Event for "Golden Week" in Japan, from April 29 to May 7, 2017.

Rough translation, cleaned up from Google:

During the period from Saturday, April 29 to Sunday, May 7, the petals will dance at PokéStops located at about 2,500 local MacDonald's. The "Lure module collaboration event" will be held so that you can get a lot of Pokemon! GO Golden Week goes to McDonald's GO!

Unlike the American Thanksgiving event, which was made international, this event was Japan-only, with McDonald's Japan footing the bill.

Pokémon Go and Knight Foundation on May 7, 2017

Niantic, the developer behind Pokémon Go and Ingress, and the Knight Foundation, and organization focused on community engagement, announced an ongoing partnership that hopes to use location and augmented-reality based gaming to help bring neighborhoods and neighbors together.

The first event was set for May 7 in Charlotte, North Carolina, as part of the Open Streets 704 event in a 2.5-mile area. 16 PokéStops and two Gyms, selected by the City of Charlotte at significant sites along the route, were offer increased spawns to help make it exciting and engaging for everyone.

May 4, 2017 - Niantic, Inc., creators of hit augmented reality games Pokémon GO and Ingress, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation have formed a multi-year partnership to advance civic engagement in local communities around the United States through augmented reality experiences. The partnership will foster discovery, bring communities together, and promote engagement within public spaces by leveraging Niantic's mobile location-based technology and experiences at select community events supported by The Knight Foundation.

"We founded Niantic to give people the chance to connect with the world around them using technology and games in innovative ways," said John Hanke, CEO, Niantic, Inc. "The partnership with The Knight Foundation is a great forum to explore how technology can drive civic engagement."

The collaboration will play out at community events in several cities, including Knight-sponsored Open Streets events. These temporarily close off car traffic so people can use streets for walking, bicycling, dancing, playing and socializing. The initiative will also tap unique facets of a city's public spaces such as parks and libraries to bring together people of diverse backgrounds and build a sense of shared community. Over the next year, Niantic will collaborate with civic leaders in several cities where Knight Foundation supports community engagement. The initiative will work to enhance these events featuring special content within their augmented reality mobile games, Ingress and Pokémon GO.

"Pokemon Go has already showed us the impact technology can have on getting people out into public," said Sam Gill, Knight vice president for learning and impact. "We're excited to work with Niantic to explore new ways to help people engage with each other and their neighborhoods."

The first event in the collaboration between Niantic and the Knight Foundation will be hosted on May 7 in Charlotte, North Carolina as part of the Open Streets 704 event in a 2.5 mile area. Though this first event will be experimental, fans of Pokémon GO can look forward to interacting with 16 PokéStops and two Gyms selected by the City of Charlotte at significant sites along the route. These locations will be highlighted on the official Open Streets 704 route map displayed at the event. To further immerse fans in the real-world experience, the physical location of each PokéStop will be physically marked along the route.

There are some reports that the event wasn't well organized and that many weren't pleased the only thing they got for participating was a set of stickers. Others seem to have really liked it. Either way, I hope we see many more of these, and like these, going forward.

Pokémon Go 'Eggstravaganza' Spring Event 2017

The Pokémon Go Spring Even lasted from April 13 to April 20, 2017. During the event, you got double XP, extra candy from egg hatches, and many 5 KM and 10 KM Pokémon began hatching from 2 KM eggs, including Lapras and Aerodactyl. Lucky Eggs were also offered at 50% in the Pokémon Go Shop.

More on the Pokémon Go Spring / Easter Event

Pokémon Go Water Festival 2017

The Pokémon Go Water Festival was done to help raise awareness for various global water days and weeks. During the festival, water-type Pokémon spawned at a much-increased rate, often replacing the typical common and rare spawns almost completely. And yes, that included Lapras!

In addition, a Magikarp hat was made available for trainers to wear, and Shiny Pokémon were introduced into Pokémon Go for the first time in the form of gold Magikarp and red Gyarados.

More on the Pokémon Go Water Festival Event

More on Shiny Pokémon in Pokémon Go

Pokémon Go Snorlax in Japan Event 2017

Similar to last fall's Lapras event, Japan's Kumamoto region is getting a Snorlax event to help bolster tourism following the earthquake of 2016.

Here's an approximate translation:

We've received information that in the Kumamoto prefecture and in Oita prefecture, Yufu city and Beppu city, Snorlax has begun appearing more frequently. Was it roused by the Pokémon flute? The phenomenon is expected to continue from March 4 to March 13. There are areas and places where local reconstruction work is continuing. Do not enter a dangerous place. Otherwise, please enjoy Kumamoto and Oita!

If you're in Japan or have wanted to go to Japan, and Snorlax is still on your must-get list, now's the time to go!

Pokémon Day from February 26 to March 6, 2017

The Pokémon Day event saw Pokémon Go join the larger festivities by offering a special, limited edition Pikachu in a festive hat that could be caught from February 26 at 1:00 p.m. PST to March 6 at 1:00 p.m. PST.

More on the Pokémon Day event and Party Hat Pikachu

Pokémon Go Valentine's Day Event 2017

Pokémon Go ran a Valentine's Day event for a whole week! That's right, from February 8 to February 15, 2017.

During the Valentine's event there was double candy, half walking distances, increased spawning rates for pink Pokémon, and Lures that lasted six hours.

More about the Pokémon Go Valentine's event

Pokémon Go Holiday & New Year Events 2016/2017

The Pokémon Go Holiday & New Year Events overlapped, the holiday part running from December 25 through January 3, 2017 and the New Year part, December 30 through January 8.

During the holiday part, it offered and increased spawn rate for limited-time Santa Pikachu, an increased chances of hatching Gen 2 babies Cleffa, Igglybuff, Togepi, Smoochum, Elekid, or Magby, and a free 1-time Incubator from the first PokéStop spin of the day.

During the New Year part, it offered Increased spawn rate for Gen 1 Starter Pokémon and their evolutions, Bulbasaur, Ivysaur, Venusaur, Charmander, Charmeleon, Charizard, Squirtle, Wartortle, and Blastoise, and Lures lasting twice as long.

More about the Pokémon Go Holiday and New Year Events

Pokémon Go Thanksgiving Event 2016

The Pokémon Go Thanksgiving Event ran from November 23rd through November 30th. It offered Double XP and Stardust for catching, hatching, and evolving Pokémon.

More about the Pokémon Go Thanksgiving Event

Pokémon Go Lapras in Japan Event 2016

From November 11 to November 23, 2016, Pokémon Go made Lapras easier to find in the Iwate, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures of Japan. It was an attempt to help bring tourism back to the region following the earthquake earlier in the year.

Rough translation:

Listen up everyone! It has been confirmed that Lapras is now easier to find in the coastal regions of Iwata, Miyagi, and Fukushima Prefectures. The phenomenon will continue until November 23. Please go out and journey in Tohoku! There are many wonderful discoveries to be made beyond Pokémon Go.

Pokémon Go Halloween Event 2016

The Pokémon Go Halloween Event ran from October 26 through November 1. It offered double candy for catching, hatching, and transferring Pokémon, and cut the distance for walking Buddy Pokémon down to 1/4. Increased spawn rates were also offered for Zubat, Golbat, Drowzee, Hypno, Gastly, Haunter, Gengar, Cubone, Marowak, Meowth, and Persian.

More about the Pokémon Go Halloween Event

What Pokémon Go events do you want to see?

If you were planning the next big Pokémon Go event, when would you have it and how would you handle it?

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Pokémon Go Eggs and how to hatch them faster

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Which Pokémon can you hatch from 10 KM, 5 KM, and 2 KM Eggs? And what are the odds of hatching them? Here's the answer!

Pokémon Go isn't just about catching — hatching is a big part of the game as well. You get Pokémon Go eggs from spinning Poké Stops, incubate them, walk them for 2 KM, 5 KM, or 10 KM, and then hatch Pokémon from the common to the hyper-rare. Which Pokémon are in which Pokémon Eggs? And what's the best — read: fastest! — way to hatch them? Here's the updated list along with some tips and tricks — and maybe a cheat or two!

September 20, 2017: Super Incubators and special 2km eggs!

As a part of the Autumnal Equinox event starting on September 22, you'll be able to find Larvitar, Chansey, Mareep, and others in special 2km eggs. Perhaps more exciting is the addition of a new kind of incubator launching with the event. From Niantic:

You'll also be able to get special boxes from the in-game shop that feature items like Lucky Eggs, Lure Modules, and all-new Super Incubators which hatch Eggs 1.5 times quicker!

No doubt these Super Incubators are going to cost a little extra, but if you're trying to burn through what seems like an endless supply of 5km eggs so you can refill your inventory these might be the best way to go!

September 3, 2017: Latest changes to Pokémon Go Eggs examined and explained!

Following the Pokémon Go Anniversary Event in July, Pokémon Go once again made changes to the Pokémon Egg pools and rarity tiers. Here's what's been discovered.

From The Silph Road

We are now confident that changes occurred at the beginning of the Anniversary event on July 7th, with a minor change occurring at the event's end on July 23rd:

  • 9 species have recently stopped appearing in eggs
  • 13 species have been added (or restored) to eggs
  • the rarity and egg distances of several species have been changed

. Additionally, the final and rarest tier has now been confirmed, per our suspicions months ago. Consequently, we have changed our nomenclature and have replaced ULTRA-RARE with SUPER-RARE; thus we call the newly confirmed rarity tier HYPER-RARE.

I've updated the lists below to reflect these changes.

August 21, 2017: New Super Incubator hinted at for Pokémon Go

There could be a new, faster Incubator coming to Pokémon Go in the near future. It would hatch eggs faster, at least for the single (or similarly limited) amount of uses it gets.

From The Silph Road:

The leaks surrounding the new incubator have continued, confirming its name in the APK code: the SUPER INCUBATOR!

It is currently believed that this incubator will hatch eggs faster than a standard incubator.

Interestingly, the incubator itself received a makeover this update, and the SUPER INCUBATOR has a unique (purple!) look as well. It is currently unknown whether this item will be purchaseable or given as an award.

What kind of Pokémon Eggs are there in Pokémon Go?

Aside from the very different Lucky Eggs, available in the Shop, there are three kinds of Pokémon Eggs in Pokémon Go:

  • 2 KM Eggs with green spots.
  • 5 KM Eggs with yellow spots.
  • 10 KM Eggs with purple spots.

Each type of Pokémon Egg can hatch a different kind of Pokémon.

What are the rarity tiers for Pokémon Eggs in Pokémon Go?

After documenting 5,945 Pokémon Egg hatches since Halloween, The Silph Road shares:

Egg species is determined according to hidden rarity 'tiers' that are not the same as the egg distance tiers (i.e. 2 km, 5 km, 10 km).

In simple English, this means that not all 10 km egg species are rarer than 2 km egg species or 5 km egg species. A simple example of this is that Dratini is presently a very common hatch, despite being in 10 km eggs. It is currently easier to acquire a 10 km egg with a Dratini inside than a 2 km egg with a Machop inside.

The tiers seem to suggest that there's a 1:2:4:8 ratio for the tiers. That means you are 2x as likely to get a common egg as an uncommon one, 2x as likely to get an uncommon egg as a rare egg, and 2x as likely to get a rare egg as an ultra-rare egg.

What kind of Pokémon hatch from each type of Egg?

As of July, 2017, following the anniversary event, Pokémon Go has once again changed the type of Pokémon that hatch from Pokémon Eggs. The biggest changes include removing the Gen 1 starters, adding the Gen 2 starters, and moving many of the previously less-than-deseriable 10 KM hatches down to 5 KM.

2 KM Eggs

Common:

  • Pichu (420)
  • Nidoran (m) (422)
  • Geodude (682)
  • Krabby (792)
  • Pichu (215)

Uncommon:

  • Oddish (611)
  • Diglett (265)
  • Abra (656)
  • Machop (685)
  • Slowpoke (688)
  • Ghastly (572)
  • Exeggute (629)
  • Spinarak (391)
  • Cleffa (354)
  • Igglybuff (293)
  • Togepi (308)
  • Aipom (678)
  • Slugma (429)

Rare:

  • Remoraid (428)

Super rare:

  • Misdreavus (1,018)

5 KM Eggs

Common:

  • Poliwag (397)
  • Ponyta (858)
  • Phanby (671)

Uncommon:

  • Growlithe (634)
  • Shellder (547)
  • Drowzee (567)
  • Voltorb (489)
  • Cubone (539)
  • Rhyhorn (959)
  • Evee (553)
  • Chinchou (610)
  • Natu (528)
  • Marill (240)
  • Hoppip (290)
  • Wooper (340)
  • Swinub (379)
  • Mantine (1,161)
  • Stantler (1,136)
  • Tyrogue (231)
  • Smoochum (703)
  • Elekid (613)
  • Magby)

Rare:

  • Seel (513)
  • Onix (572)
  • Tangela (1,262)
  • Scyther (1,408)
  • Pinsir (1,583)
  • Chikorita (458)
  • Cyndaquil (475)
  • Totadile (578)
  • Snubbul (642(
  • Teddiursa (676)
  • Houndour (634)

Super rare:

  • Griber (725)
  • Lickitung (755)
  • Koffing (623)
  • Omanyte (768)
  • Kabuto (670)
  • Pineco (597)
  • Gligar (1,004)
  • Qwilfish (1,091)
  • Sneasel (1,067)

Hyper Rare:

  • Wobbufet (585)
  • Girafarig (1,064)
  • Dunsparce (923)
  • Shuckle (1710

10 KM Eggs

Uncommon:

  • Porygon (895)
  • Dratini (491)
  • Mareep (506)
  • Larvitar (517)

Rare:

  • Chasey (839)
  • Sudowoodo (1,180)
  • Skarmory (1,161)

Super rare:

  • Lapras (1,487)
  • Aerodactyl (1,490)
  • Snorlax (1,917)
  • Miltank (1,321)

Are there any Pokémon that are only available from Eggs?

The babies!

  • Pichu (baby Pikachu)
  • Togepi (baby Togetic)
  • Cleffa (baby Clefairy)
  • Igglybuff (baby Jigglypuff)
  • Magby (baby Magmar)
  • Smoochum (baby Jinx)
  • Elekid (baby Electobuzz)

Are there any Pokémon you CAN'T hatch from Eggs?

You can't hatch any evolved form Pokémon from Pokémon Eggs, only baby or base-level forms. So, you can't hatch a Pikachu, Dragonite or Tyranitar, but you can hatch the Pichu, Dratini, or Larvitar that evolve into them. You also can't hatch any Legendary or Mythical Pokémon, including the Legendary Birds, Legendary Dogs, Tower Duo, Celebi, Mew, or Mewtwo.

Other than that, you can't hatch Ditto, only catch it in disguise in the wild. And, although you could when the game first launched, you can no longer hatch regionals from eggs:

  • Farfetch'd
  • Kangaskhan
  • Mr. Mime
  • Taurus
  • Heracross
  • Corsola

Others have either been removed from eggs:

  • Bulbasaur
  • Squirtle
  • Chambader
  • Caterpie
  • Weedle
  • Pidgey
  • Rattata
  • Spearow
  • Zubat
  • Meowth
  • Mankey
  • Bellsprout
  • Doduo
  • Horsea
  • Magikarp
  • Sentrat
  • Hoothoot
  • Ledyba
  • Sunkern
  • Murkrow
  • Snubbull
  • Teddiursa
  • Tentacool
  • Psyduck
  • Sandshrew
  • Paras

And the regionals:

  • Farfetch'd
  • Kangaskhan
  • Mr. Mime
  • Taurus
  • Heracross
  • Corsola

But, I've hatched the Gen 1 starters from eggs, what gives?

Pokémon Go seems to currently be going back and forth between having the Gen 1 and Gen 2 starters in eggs. Right now, it's the Gen 2 starters turn again.

How do you get a Pokémon Egg?

Pokémon Eggs are different than the Lucky Eggs you get when you reach a significant new level or buy at the Shop. You can't buy Pokémon Eggs at all — You have to collect them at PokéStops. Spin the stop and there's a roughly 20% chance you'll get a Pokémon Egg along with the more common balls, potions, and revives.

That doesn't mean you'll get one egg every five stops, though. Random is random, which means you could get five eggs in a row or none at all. If you keep visiting and spinning PokéStops, though, you'll eventually get Pokémon Eggs.

New to Pokemon Go? Check out our ultimate guide first!

Where do you see Pokémon Eggs when you get them?

Pokémon Eggs are kind of hidden away but once you know where they are you can check on which ones you have, and how many, at any time.

  1. Tap the PokéBall button to bring up the menu.
  2. Tap the Pokémon button.
  3. Swipe from right to left to see your Pokémon Eggs.

You can have up to 9 Pokémon Eggs at any one time.

How can you tell which exact Pokémon is in a Egg?

You can't. Not until you hatch it. It's generally believed that when you spin a PokéStop and Pokémon Go determines you're getting an Egg, it first determines the Pokémon you're getting and then hides inside the appropriate type of Egg. For example, if it determines you're getting an Egg, it'll could then determine you're getting a Dratini, and so wrap it up inside a 10 KM Egg — and you can't see it or tell what it is until it comes out.

That means it doesn't matter where you are or what you do after you get an Egg. What's inside is already decided. It's also why, when Pokémon Go makes a change to Eggs for an event or any other reason, it won't affect Eggs you already have, only ones you get from that point on.

What about CP, Level, and stats (IV)?

The Level of a Pokémon in an Egg is the same as the Level of your Trainer when you acquire the Egg, up to a limit of Level 20. So, if you spin the PokéStop and get the Egg when you're Level 15, the Pokémon that eventually hatches from it will also be Level 15. If you're Level 20, 25, or 35, though, the Pokémon will be Level 20. That's as high as Eggs go. CP will match the Level.

For Stats (IV), Pokémon you hatch will be in the higher range:

  • Mystic: 80-100%: "Your [Pokémon] is a wonder! What a breathtaking Pokémon!" or 66-79% "Overall, your [Pokémon] has certainly caught my attention."
  • Valor: 80-100%: "Overall, your [Pokémon] simply amazes me! It can accomplish anything!" or 66-79%: "Overall, your [Pokémon] is a strong Pokémon. You should be proud!"
  • Instinct: 80-100%: "Overall, your [Pokémon looks like it can really battle with the best of them!" or 66-79%: "Overall, your [Pokémon] is really strong!"

You can also look at the maximum CP numbers in the list above. The closer your Pokémon is to the top, the closer it is to being "perfect" — highest stats in every category.

Okay, how do you hatch a Pokémon Egg?

You hatch your Pokémon Eggs by placing them in Incubators and then walking around until you reach the number of kilometers indicated by the Egg.

Everyone gets one free "Infinite" Incubator that lets you incubate a single Pokémon Go at a time. Pokémon Go will also give you free three-use Incubators when you reach level 6, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30, and four free when you reach level 40. To use them:

  1. Go to your Pokémon Egg screen.
  2. Tap on the Pokémon Egg you want to Incubate.
  3. Tap on Start Incubation.
  4. Tap on the Incubator you want to use.

You can also buy additional three-use Incubators from the Shop. They cost 150 Poké Coins and break after you've used them three times, but let you incubate as many Eggs as you have, all at the same time.

  1. Tap the Incubator button at the bottom right.
  2. Tap on the Shopping Bag button at the bottom right.
  3. Tap on the Incubator button.
  4. Tap on the Exchange For (150 coins) button.

You can also buy them from the Store screen if you're not already on the Egg screen. And you can buy as many as you like simply by tapping the Exchange For button repeatedly. (As long as you have enough Poké Coins.)

  1. Tap the PokéBall button to bring up the menu.
  2. Tap the Shop button.
  3. Tap on the Incubator button.
  4. Tap on the Exchange For (150 coins) button.

Note: Pokémon Go's Holiday Event gave away one free 1-use Incubator a day for the first PokéStop you spun and had discount Incubators available for sale. No telling when or if that'll happen again, but it's something to look out for!

Once you have the Pokémon Egg in the Incubator, you need to walk to hatch it. How far you have to walk correlates to the distance of the Egg you have.

  • 2 kilometers for 2 KM Eggs (green).
  • 5 kilometers for 5 KM Eggs (yellow).
  • 10 kilometers for 10 KM Eggs (purple).

Does it matter what type of Incubator you use for each type of egg?

Any type of Incubator can be used to hatch any type of Pokémon Egg. That said, if you want the most from your Incubators:

  1. Put 2 KM eggs in your unlimited use Incubator first.
  2. Put 10 km eggs in your three-use Incubators first.

Look at it this way: If you have a 3-use Incubator and you use it for 2 km eggs, it'll disappear after 6 km. If you use it for 10 km eggs, you'll get 30 km out of it, or 5x the distance for your money.

Can you see how far you've traveled with a Pokémon Go Egg?

Yup! As you walk, the Pokémon Egg screen will update to show you the distance you've walked each Egg up to one decimal place. For example, if you walk 1.3 KM, you'll see 1.3 / 2 KM, 1.3 / 5 KM, or 1.3 / 10 KM.

If you tap on a Pokémon Egg, you can see the distance up to two decimal places.

The distance is updated every 4.2 minutes so, don't worry if you walk for a bit and don't see any immediate changes.

How fast can you walk to hatch a Pokémon Egg?

It's currently believed the optimal speed for hatching a Pokémon Go is 10.5 KM/H (6.5 M/H). Go slower and it'll just take you longer to hatch. Go faster and Pokémon Go will discount the distance you're traveling or, if you go fast enough, ignore it altogether.

If you reach 35 KM/H (22 MP/H), you'll get the speed-lock pop up. At that point, little if any of your distance will be counted.

Do you have to walk or can you jog, run, cycle, skate, ski... or drive?

You can travel any way you like, you just can't exceed 10.5 KM/H if you want all your distance to count, or 35 KM/H if you want anything to count at all.

If you've got a great way to go 10.5 KM/H, like on a scooter, skates, or cross-country skis, go for it!

Do you have to travel in a straight line?

Pokémon Go measures distance in a straight line based on the change in GPS position. So, to get maximum distance, you should travel in a straight line too.

It's believed that Pokémon Go actually records distance more frequently, though. Somewhere between one to four times a minute. So, you could theoretically change direction after a minute or so and still get good results.

Do you have to have Pokémon Go open while you're traveling?

For your distance to record, you have to have at least one of the following things:

  • Pokémon Go open on your phone.
  • Pokémon Go Plus connected to your phone.
  • Pokémon Go for Apple Watch with a Workout started.

Are any one of those methods better than any other?

Currently, Pokémon Go for Apple Watch, once a Workout is started, doesn't record based on GPS but based on your step count, which means you don't have to worry about walking in a straight line. You can record distance while walking around your house, even using a treadmill.

Do you get anything else from hatching an Egg?

Yes! You also get XP, Candies, and Stardust. XP is always the same but candies and Stardust falls along a range.

  • 2KM egg: 200 XP, 5 to 15 candies, 500-1500 Stardust.
  • 5KM egg: 500 XP, 10 to 21 candies, 1000-2100 Stardust.
  • 10KM egg: 1000 XP, 16 to 32 candies, 1600-3200 Stardust.

Any cheats to hatch Pokémon eggs faster?

There are, though some can start or stop working depending on how Pokémon Go updates. They include ways to benefit from "GPS drift", ways to get more distance when you're driving, and more.

See the Pokémon Go cheats

Your Pokémon Go Egg hatching tips?

Do you have any tips, tricks, or cheats for hatching Eggs in Pokémon Go? Drop them into the comments and we'll try them out.

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How to fix iOS 11 and iPhone 8 battery life problems

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you fix battery life problems after updating to iOS 11 or upgrading to iPhone 8? Here are our top power-saving tips!

Apple currently offers the standard iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and the smaller iPhone SE. Between them, they're rated for 10 to 12 hours of battery life while browsing the web, checking email, and chatting. But if you've just updated to iOS 11, or you're upgrading to an iPhone 8, you might see a serious drain on your battery power. Rather than cursing and throwing your iPhone — as much as you might want to! — here's what you can do to fix battery life and get on with your life.

Wait for it

Whether you restore from backup or set up as new, your new iPhone or new version of iOS 11 could expend up a lot of power downloading apps, games, mail, photos, and other content. That's because the Wi-Fi radio stays on for a long time, and Spotlight — the iOS search system — has to index everything. When radios and processors can't sleep, power consumption goes way up.

If you've just upgraded the hardware, updated to iOS 11, or restored, give things a day or so to finish up and go back to normal. If you're fine after that, great. If not, keep reading!

Test on standby

In addition to the system taking a while to really finish transferring everything over, we also tend to spend a long time playing with new phones and new features. That's especially true with things like Live Photos, 12 megapixel cameras, 4K video, iMessage apps, Siri integrations, and more. So the screen stays on, storage gets written to, WI-Fi and maybe cellular radios stay lit up, and power gets consumed.

In other words, if you're battery feels like it's only lasting half as long, the first step to fixing it is figuring out if you're using it twice as much.

So, note down how much battery life you have left. Then put your iPhone down for 20-40 minutes. When you pick it back up, note down how much battery life you have left again. If there isn't a big change while in standby, you're probably okay, and your battery life will return to normal when your usage returns to normal (after the novelty wears off).

If your iPhone continued to drain and drain fast, even when you weren't using it, keep reading!

Reset

Rebooting, restarting, or resetting is the oldest cliche in troubleshooting. Because it works. Sometimes a good reset is all that's needed to kick bad bits loose.

iPhone 8 and iPhone 7 requires different button combo than previous iPhones:

If your iPhone 8 or iPhone 7 stops responding and you can't even turn it off by holding down the power button, you may need

  1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side
  2. While continuing to hold the On/Off button, press and hold the volume down button on the left side of your iPhone.
  3. Hold both buttons as the screen turns off, and keep holding them until the screen turns back on and displays the Apple logo.

For those previous iPhones updated to iOS 11, it's the same buttons:

  1. Press and hold down both the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button at the same time.
  2. Keep them held down until you see an Apple logo.
  3. Let go.

For iPhone 6 and later, the power button is located on the right side:

On iPhone through iPhone 5s, and iPhone SE, the power button is located on the top:

Once your iPhone has rebooted, repeat the previous steps and see if battery drain has returned to normal. If not, keep reading!

Check usage

iOS contains a terrific battery usage — aka battery shaming — utility that lets you know exactly which apps and services are using your battery and how.

  1. Launch Settings from your Home screen.
  2. Tap on Battery.
  3. Wait a moment for Battery Usage to populate.

  4. Tap on the Show Detailed Usage button to get a breakdown of foreground and background power usage.
  5. Tap on Last 7 Days to get a broader look at power consumption over time.

It can be tricky to understand, but here's the deal: If you see iCloud Photo Library there, and you've just upgraded, it's a sign you're downloading thumbnails and things should return to normal when you're done. If you see Facebook there and it says 4% on screen and 40% on background, it's a sign something has gone wrong.

At that point, you can force quit a rogue app and likely get your power consumption back to normal.

  1. Double click the Home button to bring up the fast app switcher.
  2. Swipe to the app you want to force quit.
  3. Touch the app card and flick it up and off the screen

If an app appears to be consistently misbehaving, you can try re-installing it or even switching to an alternative app or a service's website for some of your activity.

Restore as new

Sometimes restoring from an old backup, especially a backup of a different device like an iPad, can be less than ideal. Cruft builds up and things just don't run like they used to. Sometimes your once-fresh setup also goes stale.

If you suspect that's the case, you can suck it up and set up your iPhone as new. Yes, it can be an incredible pain in the apps, but if you have a significant and continual problem, and nothing else can fix it, setting up as new can be a solution.

It's the nuclear option, no doubt about it. You will have to set up almost everything again, including passwords and settings, and you will lose all your saved data like game levels, health, and activities, but in most cases, your battery life will be better than ever.

Battery cases and banks

If you need to go longer than the built-in battery in your iPhone will allow, one option is to get an external battery. You can either get a battery case or. a battery bank. A battery case keeps everything tightly packed together but limits the size and scope of the power source — it can't be too big to fit in your pocket, and it typically can't power other devices as well. A battery bank can come in all shapes and sizes and can often charge multiple devices, even at once.

I have both a battery case for my iPhone 7 and a battery bank with two charging ports for my iPhone 7 Plus and iPad. They've both been lifesavers, especially when traveling. Here are some of iMore's favorites:

Low Power Mode

If your battery life is normal but you want to get even more out of it, case or no case, you can use Low Power Mode. It turns off processes and otherwise conserves as much power as it can.

  1. Launch the Settings app from the Home screen.
  2. Tap Battery.
  3. Toggle Low Power Mode to on.

You can tell when Low Power Mode is enabled by looking at the color of the battery icon — it turns yellow. It will automatically turn off any time you recharge above 80% or more, so if you want to keep it on, you'll need to switch it on every time.

You can also switch on Low Power Mode quickly by using Siri. Just say "Hey Siri, turn on low power mode!"

If even Low Power mode isn't enough — you're stuck in the wilderness, at a conference with poor reception and no power — there are a few other hacks you can try.

  • Turn down the screen brightness.
  • Set Auto-Lock to 1 minute.
  • Use headphones instead of the speaker if you have to listen to audio or music.
  • Hide the Clock app in a folder. That animation uses GPU cycles. (Okay, silicon geeks only.)

Contact Apple

Every once and a while, you get a problem you just can't solve. Like any electronics, sometimes things go wrong. If you have AppleCare or AppleCare+, you should absolutely book a Genius Bar appointment and avail yourself of it. If you don't live close to an Apple Store, you can call 1-800-MY-APPLE in order to set up a mail-in repair.

More power saving tips!

If any of these power-saving tips worked for you, let me know! If you've got any tips of your own, let me know that too!

Updated September 2017: Updated with information about iOS 11 and the iPhone 8 and X!

<!--*/ <!--*/ <!--*/ img { width: 100%; height: auto; } .devicebox ul { display: table; margin: 0 0 10px; width: 100%; } .devicebox ul li { background: #f7f7f7; margin: 2px 0; padding: 4px 15px; } .devicebox ul li:hover { background: #fff; } .devicebox ul li:before { display: none; } .devicebox p ~ p { line-height: 1.25; } .devicebox p:first-of-type + p { padding: 15px; } .devicebox a.buy-link { border-radius: 5px; display: inline-block; font: 14px/31px "Proxima Nova Extrabld",Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; text-align: center; } .devicebox a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:link, .devicebox a.buy-link:active, .devicebox a.buy-link:visited { background: #37B5D7; color: #FFF; } .devicebox a.buy-link:hover { background: #2694B2; text-decoration: none; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { content: "\e61e"; font: 40px/0 "ac_iconset" !important; margin: 0 3px 0 -8px; vertical-align: middle; } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { /* div:not(.columns-3) excludes help menu content */ .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p img, .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .article-body-wrap > div:not(.columns-3) > *:first-child:not(.sticky-wrapper) .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 660px) { .devicebox h3 { text-align: center; } .devicebox ul, .devicebox p { display: block; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 660px) { .devicebox { padding: 20px 0 25px; } .devicebox .video { float: left; margin: 0 30px 0 0; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox h3 + p { bottom: 37px; display: block; overflow: hidden; position: absolute; top: 60px; width: calc(100% - 375px); } .devicebox p img, .devicebox p > img { position: absolute; top: 50%; transform: translateY(-50%); } .devicebox p:nth-child(n+3), .devicebox ul { box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: calc(100% - 345px); width: 340px; } .devicebox p.list-head { margin-top: -5px; } } @media all and (min-width: 1025px), all and (max-width: 800px) and (min-width: 661px), all and (max-width: 500px) { /* 2x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(even) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:last-of-type:nth-of-type(odd) { width: 100%; } } @media all and (max-width: 1024px) and (min-width: 801px), all and (max-width: 659px) and (min-width: 501px) { /* 3x buy buttons */ .devicebox a.buy-link { width: calc(100%/3 - 10px/3); margin: 0 5px 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-of-type(3n):not(:nth-last-of-type(2)) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:only-child { width: 100%; margin: 0 0 5px 0; } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1), .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link { width: calc(50% - 2.5px); } .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(2):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link, .devicebox a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(4):nth-of-type(3n+1) ~ a.buy-link:nth-last-of-type(odd) { margin: 0 0 5px 0; } } @media all and (max-width: 800px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } } @media all and (max-width: 500px) { .devicebox { margin: 0 0 30px; max-width: none; width: auto; } .devicebox a.buy-link:before { display: none; } } .page-admin .devicebox {max-width: 350px;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe {position: relative; height: 0; padding-bottom: 56.9%;} .page-admin .devicebox .video_iframe iframe {width: 100%; height: 100%; position: absolute;} /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/

iOS 11 installation: How to troubleshoot common problems

Posted on September 19, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

iOS 11 won't install or update on your iPhone or iPad? Here's what to do!

iOS has gone to 11! Installing the update only requires a few steps . Normally, it should be a quick and easy process — but things can and do go wrong. If it times out, fails to verify, won't download, won't complete, or won't reboot, you'll need to troubleshoot. Here's what you can do!

What do you do if iOS 11 doesn't seem to be downloading or installing?

When you tap to install iOS 11, if nothing happens, you can try force-qutting Settings and beginning again.

  1. Double click the Home button (or 3D Touch/firmly press the left side of the screen on iPhone 6s or later) to bring up the fast app switcher.
  2. Swipe across to the Settings app card.
  3. Kill the Settings Apps card by flicking it up and off the screen.

What if iOS 11 freezes or stops responding?

If your iPhone or iPad becomes non-responsive, hangs, or otherwise stops working, your next step is to force it to reboot.

On iPad, iPod touch, and any iPhone prior to iPhone 7:

  1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side (iPhone 6 or later) or top (all other iPhones, iPods, and iPads) of your device.
  2. While continuing to hold the On/Off button, press and hold the Home button on the front of your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad.
  3. Hold both buttons as the screen turns off, and keep holding them until the screen turns back on and displays the Apple logo.

On iPhone 7 and newer:

  1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side
  2. While continuing to hold the On/Off button, press and hold the volume down button on the left side of your iPhone.
  3. Hold both buttons as the screen turns off, and keep holding them until the screen turns back on and displays the Apple logo.

How about if iOS 11 won't restart or let you reboot?

If your iPhone or iPad doesn't want to shut down or start back up, you can escalate to recovery mode.

For iPad, iPod touch, and iPhone prior to iPhone 7:

  1. Turn Off your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad if it isn't off already.

    1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side (iPhone 6 or later) or top (all other iPhones, iPods, and iPads) for 3 seconds.
    2. Swipe the slide to power off confirmation slider to the right.

  2. Press and hold down the Home button on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPhone.
  3. Plug your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad into your Mac or Windows PC and make sure iTunes is running.
  4. Release the Home button when you see the Connect to iTunes screen.

On iPhone 7 and newer:

  1. Turn Off your iPhone if it isn't off already.

    1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side (iPhone 6 or later) or top (all other iPhones) for 3 seconds.
    2. Swipe the slide to power off confirmation slider to the right.

  2. Press and hold down the volume down button on your iPhone.

  3. Plug your device into your Mac or Windows PC and make sure iTunes is running.
  4. Release the volume down button when you see the Connect to iTunes screen.

What if even recovery mode doesn't work? Can you DFU iOS 11?

If all else seems lost, you can escalate all the way to device firmware update (DFU) mode. You'll need access to iTunes, the internet, and your lightning cable to reload the OS, though.

For iPad, iPod touch, and iPhone prior to iPhone 7:

  1. Plug in your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad to your Mac or Windows PC.
  2. Make sure iTunes is running.
  3. Turn Off your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad if it isn't already.

    1. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side (iPhone 6 or later) or top (all other iPhones, iPods, and iPads) of the device for 3 seconds.
    2. Swipe the slide to power off slider to the right.

  4. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side (iPhone 6 or later) or top (all other iPhones, iPods, and iPads) of your device for 3 seconds.
  5. Press and hold down the Home button on the front of your device while still holding down the On/Off button.
  6. Keep holding both buttons down for 10 seconds. (If you see the Apple logo, you've held them too long and will need to start again.)
  7. Let go of the On/Off Button but keep holding the Home button for about 5 seconds. (If you see the "Plug into iTunes" screen, then you've held it too long and will need to start again.)
  8. If the screen stays black, that's it! Your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad should now be in DFU mode.

On iPhone 7 and newer:

  1. Plug in your iPhone.
  2. Make sure iTunes is running.
  3. Turn Off your device if it isn't already.
  4. Press and hold down the On/Off button on the right side of your device for 3 seconds.
  5. Press and hold down the volume down button on the left side of your device while still holding down the On/Off button.
  6. Keep holding both buttons down for 10 seconds. (If you see the Apple logo, you've held them too long and will need to start again.)
  7. Let go of the On/Off Button but keep holding the volume down button for about 5 seconds. (If you see the "Plug into iTunes" screen, then you've held it too long and will need to start again.)
  8. If the screen stays black, that's it! Your iPhone should now be in DFU mode.

You can then try the iOS 11 installation over iTunes instead.

Any iOS 11 trouble-shooting questions?

If you need any more help with iOS 11, drop your questions in the comments below!

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How to download and install iOS 11 on your iPhone or iPad

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

iOS 11 is bringing some solid updates to iPhone and iPad, and if you want the latest, you'll want to download it now. Here's how to do it!

What's new in iOS 11

iOS 11 is a fairly subtle update, bringing some slight design changes, including a customizable Control Center, more 3D Touch integration, and Notification Center and the Lock screen are now one.

Siri's voice is also getting an update to sound more natural, and it now learns preferences and sync your information across devices so that it can learn your habits in order to preemptively get a sense of what you want (not creepy at all).

The Files app is the bigger update here, allowing you to organize and view all manner of documents, with the ability to even save many of them right to your iPhone or iPad. This is especially handy for iPad Pro users. iPad and iPhone users will also see a new Drag and Drop feature, where you'll be able to drag content from one app to another.

Notes is getting some workflow updates, like the ability to search handwriting and some document scanning abilities, while Maps is getting some new tricks, like lane guidance. If you're hoping for a grandiose overhaul, you're not getting it with iOS 11, but there are still some handy changes that come with this latest operating system.

How to install iOS 11 using Software Update on your iPhone or iPad

The easiest way for most people to download iOS 11 is over-the-air, directly on their device. It's fast, it's efficient, and it's simple to do.

  1. Make sure you have a recent iCloud backup.
  2. Launch Settings from your Home screen.
  3. Tap on General.
  4. Tap on Software Update.
  5. Tap on Download and Install.
  6. Enter your Passcode, if prompted.
  7. Tap Agree to the Terms and Conditions.
  8. Tap Agree again to confirm.

The download will begin automatically. If the download does not begin right away, you may see a notice: "Preparing to download." Give it a couple of minutes and the download will begin shortly.

How to install iOS 11 using iTunes on your Mac or Windows PC

If you have limited space on your device or software update isn't working for whatever reason, you can update using iTunes.

  1. Make sure you have a recent iTunes backup. Make it encrypted so all your password and other private data is preserved.
  2. Launch iTunes on your Mac or Windows PC.
  3. Plug your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch in using your USB to Lightning or USB to 30-pin Dock cable.
  4. Click on the device icon at the top left to go to the device tab.
  5. Click on Check for Update in the Summary pane.
  6. Click on Download and Update
  7. Agree to the Terms and Conditions.
  8. Enter the Passcode on your iPhone or iPad, if prompted.

How to make sure you have the release version of iOS 11

If you're running a the developer or public beta, Apple might push you an update if the build numbers are different (we're still checking on that). If for some reason nothing else works, you can always force an update at any time if you're willing to go through the trouble:

  1. Make sure you have a recent iTunes backup. Make it encrypted so all your password and other private data is preserved.
  2. Launch iTunes on your Mac or Windows PC
  3. Plug your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch in using your USB to Lightning cable.
  4. Click on the device icon at the top left to go to the device tab.
  5. Click on Restore in the Summary pane.
  6. Confirm that you want to restore.
  7. Agree to the Terms and Conditions.
  8. Enter the Passcode on your iPhone or iPad, if prompted.

Update September 19, 2017: Apple has just released iOS 11 for iPhone and iPad, which brings updates, the Files app, and makes security improvements.

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How to download and install watchOS 4 on your Apple Watch

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

watchOS 4 features new Watch faces, more health and fitness tools, and a whole lot more. Here's how to download and install it!

Because Apple Watch is paired to the iPhone for internet access and easy device management, watchOS updates are done using the Watch for iPhone app. To install watchOS 4, you should first update your iPhone to iOS 11 or later. Once that's done, make sure you have your iPhone ready and on Wi-Fi, and your Apple Watch charged to 50% or more and connected to its magnetic charger. Yeah... here's we go!

How to download and install to watchOS 4

  1. Update your iPhone to iOS 11 or later.
  2. Connect your iPhone to Wi-Fi and launch the iOS 11 Watch app.
  3. Make sure your Apple Watch is charged to at least 50% and connect it to the magnetic charger.
  4. Tap on the My Watch tab.
  5. Tap on General.
  6. Tap on Software Update.

  7. Tap on Download and Install.
  8. Enter your iPhone Passcode when prompted.
  9. Tap Agree to the Terms and Conditions

  10. Tap Proceed on your Apple Watch to begin the download.
  11. Enter your Passcode on Apple Watch.

The watchOS 4 update will download and transfer to your Apple Watch and Apple Watch will reboot to apply the update. You can follow the progress on the Apple Watch screen, and once it's done, you'll be all set.

Apple watchOS update failing or frozen? Here's the fix!

Updated September 2017: Updated for watchOS 4 and iOS 11.

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How to download and install tvOS 11 on your Apple TV

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

tvOS 11 has a few major changes, as well as some bug fixes and improvements. Here's how to download and install it on your Apple TV!

How to install tvOS 11 using Software Update on your Apple TV

Your Apple TV should prompt you to let you know when an update is available, and you can simply click through and do it. It may not prompt you immediately, however, or you may choose to do the update later when the timing suits you better. Either way, you can instigate an Apple TV update manually whenever you want to, and with just a few clicks.

  1. Click on the Settings app from your Apple TV Home screen.
  2. Click on System.
  3. Click on Software Update.

  4. Click on Update Software.
  5. Click on Download and Install

  6. Click on Update Now.
  7. Wait for your Apple TV to finish the update.

Once the update is done, and the Apple TV has rebooted, you'll be back up and running the new version of tvOS.

Update September 2017: Updated for tvOS 11.

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iOS 11 review: Smarter, better, faster, bolder

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Drag and Drop. Files.app. Enhanced intelligence and learning. Peer-to-peer Apple Pay. A new App Store design. Augmented Reality. Machine Learning. And more. This year Apple takes iOS to 11 — but how well does it get there?

Ten years ago, Apple shocked the world and shook up the industry by unveiling not just the iPhone but what would later become known as iOS — the mobile, multitouch operating system that powered it. iOS combined engaging design, delightful animations, and intuitive interactions with a real web browser, real apps, iTunes sync, and a multitasking demo that left the crowd — and a Starbucks employee on the other end of the biggest latte order in history — speechless.

Since then, Apple has added third-party apps and innumerable new features, and both directly and, through inspiring others, made computing accessible to billions of people.

Taking all that to 11 is an easy line — but not an easy job. Many of us count on iOS to keep us connected, informed, entertained, on time, in the right place, and with everything we want and need, every moment of the day and night. It's what ties us to our friends and families, locally and around the world, and lets us do our jobs and have our fun. It's become our external memory and our life accelerator.

To keep iOS moving forward without leaving people behind, to increase productivity, creativity, efficiency, and convenience without adversely affecting approachability and inclusivity is an exquisitely tough juggling act. (I was going to say "balancing" but "juggling" feels apt.) One that involves staying focused but avoiding tunnel vision, and solving problems in a way that delivers new and improved features that are truly meaningful and impactful now and into the future.

No pressure.

To accomplish it, Apple is doubling down on smarts. What started a few years ago with sequential inference and a proactive interface is now using all the artificial intelligence, machine learning, computer vision buzzwords — and the technologies behind them — to bring more information and more actions to us, hopefully before we even know we need them.

iPad is also going even more pro. After largely sitting out last year, this year it's getting its biggest update ever — drag and drop multi-window interactions reimagined not just for multitouch, but for a level of multitouch beyond anything Apple's been willing to unleash before. And it's all at the system level, so iPhone benefits from it as well, if minimally for now.

There are also all sorts of other goodies, like person-to-person Apple Pay, a one-handed keyboard for iPhone, document scanning in notes, markup for screenshots and the web, a new Siri voice and intelligence, new Photos filters that can get "depthy" with it, indoor maps for airports and malls, HomeKit support for speakers, multi-room capable AirPlay 2, Apple Music social sharing, a whole new App Store, FaceTime captures, "automagic" setup, and the list goes on and on and on and on.

How to download and install iOS 11 to your iPhone and iPad

iOS 11 Evolution

iOS 11 is the sum of all the versions and features, additions and deprecations that have come before it. That's more than a decade of major yearly releases and quarterly updates. Here's a quick look at the "tentpole" features over the years and how they compare.

*/

iOS 2 iOS 3 iOS 4 iOS 5 iOS 6 iOS 7 iOS 8 iOS 9 iOS 10 iOS 11
Version iPhone OS 2 iPhone OS 3 iOS 4 iOS 5 iOS 6 iOS 7 iOS 8 iOS 9 iOS 10 iOS 11
Year 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017
Name Big Bear Kirkwood Apex Telluride Sundance Innsbruck Okemo Monarch Whitetail Tigris
Features App Store
Enterprise enhancements
iPhone SDK
Microsoft Exchange
Accessories access
Calendar enhancements
Cut, copy, and paste
Embedded Maps
In app purchase
Landscape
MMS
Peer-to-peer connectivity
Push notifications (redux)
Spotlight search
Stocks enhancements
Voice Memos
Enterprise enhancements
Folders
Game Center
iAd
iBooks for iPhone
Mail enhancements
Multitasking
Camera enhancements
Game Center
iCloud
iMessage
Newsstand
Notification Center
PC free
Photo enhancements
Reminders
Safari enhancements
Twitter integration
Accessibility enhancements
Apple maps
Chinese enhancements
Facebook integration
FaceTime over cellular
Mail enhancements
Passbook
Phone enhancements
Safari enhancements
Shared Photo Streams
Siri enhancements
Airdrop
Camera enhancements
Control Center
iOS in the Car
iTunes Radio
iWork for iCloud
Multitasking enhancements
Notification Center enhancements
Photos enhancements
Safari enhancements
Siri enhancements
Continuity
Extensibility
Family Sharing
Health
HomeKit
iCloud Drive
Interactive Notifications
Messages enhancements
Photos enhancements
QuickType
Spotlight enhancements
Siri intelligence
Search (new)
Apple Pay enhancements
Notes (new)
Maps (transit)
News
Multi-app (iPad)
New Lock/Home experience
Siri enhancements
Intelligence enhancements
Photos enhancements
Maps enhancements
Music enhancements
News enhancements
Home app
Phone enhancements
iMessage enhancements
Files
Dock
Drag and drop
Apple Pencil enhancement
ARKit
Person-to-person Apple Pay
App Store redesign
AirPlay 2
Control Center enhancements
Indoor Maps
Automatic setup
Core ML
Extras Contact search
Languages
Mail enhancements
MobileMe
Parental controls
Quick look enhancements
Scientific calculator
Open GL ES 2.0
Video Recording
Voice Control
720p
FaceTime
1080p
Siri
Panorama mode 120fps Slow motion
Burst mode
FaceTime Audio
Open GL ES 3.0
Touch ID
240fps Slow motion
Adaptive UI
Apple Pay
3D Touch
Live Photos
4K video
Portrait Mode
Camera zoom
AirPods/W1 integration
Portrait Lighting
Face tracking
HDR 10 / Dolby Vision

For details on those features, please see my previous reviews:

iOS 11 Compatibility

iOS 11 supports all 64-bit iOS devices. (Yes, the age of 32-bit is official over.) That means you can download and install iOS 11 on any iPhone or iPad going back to the fall of 2013.

  • iPhone X
  • iPhone 8
  • iPhone 8 Plus
  • iPhone 7
  • iPhone 7 Plus
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 6s
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone 5s
  • iPad Pro 10.5-inches
  • iPad Pro 9.7-inches
  • iPad Pro 12.9-inches
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Air
  • iPad 4
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 2
  • iPod touch 6

iOS 11 Design

iOS 7 was a major redesign. The photo-illustrative, metaphorical interfaces of the past, rich in texture were set aside for more digitally authentic, physically playful look.

With iOS 10, scuttlebutt designer working on the services apps — Apple Music, Maps, Home — came up with a bigger, bolder variation, including large titles and layered card views.

The goal was to better orient people, especially in apps with a lot of content. Back in the old days of iOS, you could be disoriented and still realize you were in Messages contacts rather than Find My Friends contacts or Game Center contacts, for example, simply based on the seeing stitched leather rather than green felt. Sounds silly, but it could mean the difference between texting a friend for help and pinging them with a challenge.

Photos in iOS 10 (left) vs. iOS 11 (right).

Large titles, which have now spread to other apps like Mail and Photos, help solve the same problem — they let you know right up front where you are. Unlike the heavy textures of the past, however, they shrink down and get out of your way after you've discovered what you need.

It's all part of the "way-finding" that Apple is focusing on with iOS 11. Inspired by airport and street signs, iOS 11 wants to show you where you can go.

They're not used — nor recommended — everywhere, especially not where they would compete with, rather than contrast against, the content. But where they are used, they work extremely well.

Mostly. There's an initial trade-off in terms of information density. With titles that big, you don't get as much content at first glance, roughly in the order of one-list item.

What's more, Instead of just size or color to distinguish informational levels, Apple is now using and recommending a mix of position, size, weight, and color. The first iOS 11 betas were too heavy for my liking but the final version is well balanced. In general, headers are on top, bigger, bolder, and darker and supporting text is underneath, smaller, thinner, and lighter. It results in faster wayfinding and much higher legibility, with a better content balance.

The new App Store design looks especially great, with the Today view really standing out. That's thanks to big, bold cards that mix text, art, and videos in a way that draws attention without overwhelming the eye. (Only the Updates tab suffers from bitsy-ness — but what's an overloaded list to do?)

Apple is also improving contrast in other ways. It's filling in button shapes, for example, increasing the size of fields, making glyphs heavier and thicker, and filling them in. At least in some apps, like Photos.

Evolution of the Passcode number pad, from iOS 6 (far left), to iOS 7, iOS 10, to iOS 11 (far right).

It makes for better legibility, especially at the speed of mobile, and is absolutely the best expression of post-iOS 7 design we've seen yet.

iOS 11 Automatic Setup

Since launch, you've set up Apple Watch by scanning a pattern on its screen with your iPhone camera. From there, it was just a few short steps before it was up and running. Now, thanks to iOS 11, you can use that same, simplified setup method for a new iPhone or iPad as well (and Apple TV with tvOS 11).

I love this. I'm not a fan of QR or pattern code scanning in general. It feels like outdated technology in an era where things like Apple Pay "just work". But, using the camera and pattern is a simple way to ensure both devices are in proximity — in your presence and under your immediate control.

Once the pattern is scanned and your passcode created and entered, peer-to-peer networking with transfer over things like your settings, iCloud Keychain, and personal content.

For years now it's been obvious that the traditional "Setup Buddy" system that walked you through the installation of a new iPhone or iPad was becoming far too long far too complicated and far too tedious to use. It had to ask you about privacy, Hey Siri, Touch ID and Apple Pay, and a list that went on and on.

And it wasn't clear how to fix it without hurting disclosure and discoverability.

Automatic Setup is that fix. You still have to do some setup, including services that want access to your location or require on-device security. But it's so much faster and better than the old way that I can't ever imagine going back.

For people like me, who have to set up multiple devices multiple times a year, because they have to write reviews like this, it's a godsend. Even for people who only set up one or two new devices every year or two, though, it's a major leap forward in speed and convenience.

iOS 11 Notification and Control Centers

Notification Center and Control Center have changed multiple times over the last few years. So much so that, compared to the other interface layers, they've always seemed more like works-in-progress. iOS 11 is no exception, with significant changes to both in order to provide a more discoverable, more consistent experience.

Notification Center has essentially been replaced with iOS 11's Lock screen. Pull down from the top of the screen (top center on iPhone X) and, like a cover sheet, you get the Lock screen interface with all notifications visible. They stay that way too, unless and until you act on them or choose to tap-to-clear them. (And you can 3D-Touch-to-clear all.)

(On Lock screen, they'll appear cleared if there haven't been any new ones since the last time you used your phone. Swipe up, though, and they'll all come back. That persistence should appease people who disliked everything being blown away every time they unlocked.)

From the cover sheet, you can swipe left to access the Camera and right to see Siri suggestions. These shortcuts are now identical regardless of whether you started on the Lock screen or accessed the pull-down from any other app on your device.

Evolution of Notification Center, from iOS 6 (far left), to iOS 7, iOS 10, to iOS 11 (far right).

It works. Mostly. Being able to pull down Lock screen makes some spatial sense, though the true Lock screen fades more than pulls down. Reconciling all the animations might help there. It still confuses me sometimes as far as the security state of my device (Lock screen vs. glanceable information screen) but I think the consistency makes for a decent trade-off.

Swiping into Camera from Notification Center, the way you've been able to do from Lock screen for years, is handy. But it really highlights its just-as-longstanding inability to let you swipe back out of it. (It collides, and loses to, the Camera's use of the gesture for switching between photo and video modes.)

The contradictions here, and in many other areas of iOS, have no easy answers. Some don't even have clear better or worse options: They're judgment calls. Overall, Apple's made those calls well. But enough of them exist now — especially with iPhone X, that I'd love to see Apple tear it all down, start with a clean slate, and come up with a new spatiality and gesture navigation system that's as coherent as possible within, between, and across apps and devices. (Easy for me to say, I know.)

Evolution of Control Center, from iOS 7 (left), to iOS 10, to iOS 11 (right).

Control Center has gotten an even bigger change. Swipe up from the bottom (or the top right of iPhone X), and you get a single screen again: No more half-height, multi-pane layout to swipe back and forth through. I'm guessing enough people failed to realize there were multiple panes that Apple had to call a mulligan and go back to a unified sheet.

To fit everything in, Control Center now fills the entire screen on iPhone. (On iPad, it fills the right side of the new App Switcher.) And the controls themselves… they're everywhere.

While other elements of iOS have gotten bigger and less informationally dense, Control Center is the opposite. It's denser than ever. You can even customize it now in Settings > Control Center so you can have more and different controls. And that includes items from almost everyone's wishlists.

Top of mine is the built-in screen recorder. Previously you had to plug into a Mac and use QuickTime to grab video from your iPhone or iPad. Now, once you add it in Settings, all you have to do is invoke Control Center, tap the record button, go to what you want to record and, when you're done, tap the red banner to end and save the video.

Apple TV Remote, Low Power Mode, Voice Memos, Guided Access, Magnifier — the options are varied and truly useful. About the only thing still missing is third-party app support. (And the ability to reassign default apps, which would likely be needed to make it truly useful.)

3D Touch (or long press on devices without 3D Touch) on a button or control and it pops you into even deeper options, too. For example, the entire Now Playing and Home panes are now contained within the pop action of its audio controls and Home icon.

Discoverability is always a concern with that type of interface, but enough is surfaced that most people should find the rest, at least given time.

I'm not sure Control Center has gotten to its final, elegantly functional destination yet. But I like the way it's going.

iOS 11 Drag and drop

The biggest feature not introduced last year was drag and drop interactivity, especially for iPad. It was rumored, it was longed for, but not matter how often people said it was coming, it never quite arrived.

Until now.

This isn't the Mac drag-and-drop with a touch layer grafted on top of it. Apple didn't graft any old code or behavior here. This is drag and drop born for multitouch. A lot of multitouch.

It's another example of Apple's long-stated belief that the Mac should be the Mac and iOS should be iOS or, perhaps better stated, legacy and preconception should never hold back the future.

For a long time, Apple has been incredibly conservative, and sometimes almost mystical about how it used multitouch. Instead of using the multitouch field to enable tricks like hover states, Apple used it to detect which fingers were being used and reject incidental contact. Instead of creating complex, multi-finger and multi-directional gesture traced like incantations across the screen, Apple has stuck to the few, really intuitive ones that move quickly and cleanly across cardinal directions or best reflected direct manipulation.

With drag and drop, though, Apple is starting to let loose.

Previously, as my colleague Serenity Caldwell has pointed out numerous times, uploading images from Photos to iMore through the CMS was arduous to the point of being unusable. Now, it's arguably better and certainly more tactile and fun than on Mac. Functionality that didn't work on iOS before, like dragging to move elements on a web page, all "just work" now.

The technology is built in at the system level, so drag and drop works on both iPhone and iPad, although iPhone implements far, far less of it right now. On iPad, you get everything Apple's got.

Touch an element — it could be an image, an icon, a text selection, whatever — and it begins to float. Keep touching it and you can drag it around the screen and drop it anywhere else that will take it. That includes other parts of the app and even entirely different apps.

Tap other elements with other fingers and they'll be added to the drop stack. Walk your fingers so one touches before the other releases, and you can switch how you're holding the stack.

Start using your other hand and — holy wow! — you can four-finger pinch or swipe to change apps, or hit the Home button and pick another app, or use the split view app switcher, or… you get the idea. But there's more: Tap inside an app to start a new email or new note or bring up a folder or uploader or… I could just keep going.

It's Apple unlocking the full-on multi-finger multitouch, and it's glorious. Complex, sometimes requiring two hands and an iPad set down on a table? Yes. But glorious.

During the early iOS 11 betas, you could even use drag-and-drop multi-select to make rearranging Home screen icons a lot less tedious. It's not working for me in the release candidate, but fingers crossed it returns at some point.

Mostly, you can drag and drop almost anything you can touch. Words or snippets of highlighted text. Pictures. Objects. Locations. Links. If it's data and can be packaged for dragging, it'll drag. There's enough "hinting" in the interaction model that you should be able to discover what's draggable quickly, and enough joy in the process that you should experiment and find all sorts of incredibly convenient use cases as time goes on.

Multitouch aside, there is another major difference between macOS and iOS drag and drop: the security model.

On iOS, only metadata — for example, the type of content you're dragging — is shared with an app you're dragging over. No actual data is handed over unless or until you actually drop it.

That's annoyed some who want to do things like preview changes on drag. It's annoyed them so much so, some have gone as far as to call the feature "drag and secure paste" instead of "drag and drop". Security and privacy are Apple's priority's, though. First, last, and always.

So, yeah, you can't preview a color change on drag but you also can't accidentally hand over a private photo or personal info to a dodgy app you just downloaded — or, you know, Facebook — as you're dragging over it to get to Files or Mail. Maybe a future version will offer secure previewing as well. Until then, though, I think Apple made the right choice.

iOS 11 Dock and multi-windowing

Despite my intermittent pleading, iPad still hasn't been given its own iPadOS interface layer the way Apple Watch and Apple TV were given watchOS and tvOS. That leaves iPad, despite its more expansive display, with essentially the same interface layer as iPhone. Though not entirely.

Two years ago, with iOS 9, Apple gave iPad multi-window multitasking. Now, with iOS 11, Apple's giving iPad better tools for using those windows.

It starts with a new Dock implementation. Instead of being anchored to the bottom of the display it's inset now, with rounded edges and a style that makes it look like it's floating. Functionally, it's just as unfettered. Dynamic now, the Dock will expand and contract to fit whatever apps you want to stick on it at any given time. It'll also present you with suggested apps and Continuity apps on the right.

If it's not already visible, you can drag the Dock up from the bottom of the display with a simple swipe. (It's usurped the gesture from Control Center on iPad just as Home has on iPhone X.)

You can still tap icons on the Dock to launch apps but, now, you can also touch and hold an icon, drag it up, and drop into a new-style Slide Over, which also floats more than docks, and also has rounded corners. (UIKit can animate corner radius now — celebrate!) You can even swipe the Slide Over from side to side depending on how you want to work.

Flick down, counterintuitively, on the top of a Slide Over and it turns into a full-on Split View. You can even stack an additional Slide Over on top of a Split View interface. It works great, especially with devices that support 4GB of RAM, like the new iPad Pro models: The primary app in Split View will stay active along with the Slide Over interface, and even a Picture-in-Picture video, if you have one running.

When the Dock is visible, a second swipe up takes you into the new App Switcher interface. It replaces the old iOS multitasking interface with a more powerful version, providing the aforementioned Control Center icons top left, along with an iPad-style version of Spaces from macOS. There, you can not only find your recent events apps, but your recent Split View pairings, and quickly pop back to not only what you were doing — but how you were doing it.

(On iPhone, you still double-click Home to invoke the fast app switcher or, on iPhone X, swipe up from the bottom and pause. The 3D Touch firm swipe from the left edge is currently not enabled but, rumor has it, will return to iPhone 6s, iPhone 7, and iPhone 8 with iOS 11.1.)

You can't pin any pairings but the system does a great job persisting the ones you use most. Notes and Safari, for example, is almost always center tap for me. (It's the one I'm using right now, after all.)

It's not perfect yet: If an app isn't in the permanent or recent section of the Dock, there's no easy way to pull it up into Slide Over or Split View. (You can try using Spotlight in Notification Center to bring it up, but it stopped working for me in later betas.)

It can also take a lot of manual dexterity — and both hands — to get all the multi-finger multitouch gestures working just right, and more than a little time and repetition before it starts to become natural.

Then, the complexity of the mechanics fade and it starts to feel like you're dealing windows onto the screen just like you'd deal cards onto a table. Terrific.

It's so cool it makes the Split View introduced in macOS a couple of years ago — and neglected ever since — feel absolutely primitive by comparison.

iOS 11 Files

I've been asking for a Files.app almost every year since iOS 4 made it obvious that per-app silos created as many problems as they solved.

Don't get me wrong: Traditional comp-sci file systems remain confusing and unapproachable to the mainstream, which is why so many files get dumped onto so many desktops. That said, by not having a relatively flat, easily searchable repository, iOS has been creating just as much confusion and anxiety.

All I've ever wanted was an analog to Photos.app and the ImagePicker API. It's a great model for the mainstream. iOS got DocumentPicker a while ago and now, finally, it's gotten Files.app as well.

On the surface, Files.app makes it easy to organize and find all the documents on your iPhone and iPad. The initial hierarchy is flat, but you can create and nest folders if you really, really want to.

Thanks to drag and drop, it's delightful to move stuff around both inside Files.app and between apps. Folders are spring-loaded, for example, so you can easily drag a file from one right into another — or a sub-folder beneath it.

You can toggle between icon view and list view, pin your most important content, and tag groups of similar content together — by dragging it over the tag color in the sidebar!

What's coolest and most important about Files.app is that Apple has taken not just its own silos, but the ones that often complicate traditional file systems, and attracted them away. What you get is a unified view of not just the files local to your iPhone or iPad, but of your iCloud Drive, and other online providers as well, including Google Drive, OneDrive, and Dropbox. So, you can truly organize and find all your files, all in one place. (Which is good, because Files.app also replaces the previous iCloud Drive app.)

The default Recents view is, perhaps the quintessential expression of that. All your latest stuff, all right up front. (You can even get to them from the Home screen or Dock thanks to 3D Touch shortcuts.)

Nothing is copied, conflated, or jumbled together: Each storage system remains separate and distinct. But you enjoy the efficiency and simplicity of seeing and using them all together.

iOS 11 Camera and Photos

Years ago, the cliche was that Nokia had the glass, Apple had the silicon, and Google had the servers. In other words, a Lumia could capture great images, Apple could calculate great images, and since Google never knew what hardware was available on any given device, they'd just suck everything up to the cloud and make the best they could from it there.

Now, though, Apple is fielding fusion lenses and doing local computational photography, where machine learning, computer vision, and a lot of smart programming start to produce images beyond what any one of those processes could do alone. (And since it's done on-device, you don't have to give up all your private photos to Apple just to reap the benefits of the processing — your valuable data stays yours.)

Portrait Mode on iPhone 7 Plus was the first mass-market application of fusion and computational photography that I'm aware of. On iOS 10, it came with fairly strict lighting requirements. On iOS 11, though, better optical and software-based stabilization, and shoots with high dynamic range (HDR), which dramatically improves low-light and high contrast performance. For extreme low-light situations, iOS 11 will even let you do Portrait Mode with the LED flash.

Noise is still an issue, but Apple does a lot with the "grain" to mitigate it. So much so that I often don't notice the noise at all at first — I'm too busy marveling at the subject. Reflections can also still be problematic, but it's starting to improve on that as well.

It's more than just faces now too. Last year, you could already capture flowers, coffee cups (so many, sorry!), and more but you could still tell it was a face-first feature. Now it feels like it's got wider ambitions. Officially. For example, grabbing onto a chain link fence and blurring the background behind it.

Apple has also switched from the ancient JPEG (joint photographic experts group) format to the new HEIF (high-efficiency image format) in iOS 11. The efficiency in the name works out to about 50% space-savings over JPG in your library. It comes at the expense of slightly longer encode times but nothing in life, and certainly nothing in imaging, is free. For photos on iPhone, though, the process is already so fast I've never noticed a difference.

What's even cooler about HEIF is that it can store multiple image assets in the same container. For example: In iOS 10, when you shot on an iPhone 7 Plus in Portrait mode, the Camera app would spit out two images — one normal, and one with the depth effect burned in. With HEIF, the depth data for Portrait Mode is retained but bundled into the same file.

The advantage to that is most apparent in photo editing, where filters can now apply different effects based on the depth or motion data. Not just on iPhone 7 Plus either. As long as the effect information is bundled into the HEIF, iPad and Mac can get every bit as "depthy" with it.

So, for example, the new filters in Camera and Photos, can apply different shades and tones based on the depth data in the photo.

Those filters have been rethought not to duplicate what you typically see on social networks but what you'd find in more classic photography: Vivid, Vivid Warm, or Vivid Cool, which play on vibrancy; Dramatic, Dramatic Warm, or Dramatic Cool, which toy with contrast, and Silvertone which rounds out the previous Mono and Noir filters with something a little more high-key.

Silvertone is probably my favorite of the new "depthy" bunch.

Apple's also been steadily improving Live Photos as well over the last couple of years. First and foremost, the quality you get from the 1.5 second before and after animations are much-improved. So much so that Apple can start to offer some really cool new effect options.

Namely, Loop, Bounce, and Long Exposure.

Just bounce with me. Just bounce with me. #ios11 #photography #bounce @georgia_dow

A post shared by Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie) on Aug 7, 2017 at 7:47am PDT

  • Loop takes the 3 seconds of Live Photo animation and fades from end back to beginning, so the video plays over and over and over again, in an endless cycle.
  • Bounce takes the animation, plays it forward, then plays it back, like a perpetual ricochet.
  • Long exposure takes the animation and shows all frames at once, so motion blurs and light stretches out across the frame.

HEIF also works with Live Photos. Instead of a separate JPG and MOV (movie) file, you now have both the still/key photo and the video bundled into one file. That means those effects are also non-destructive, and you can go from bounce to loop and back again any time you like.

And... loop! #ios11 #photography #loop @georgia_dow

A post shared by Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie) on Aug 7, 2017 at 7:49am PDT

In all cases, the effects are intelligent and try to lock position on static elements so the moving elements become even more dynamic in contrast.

Sure, these types of effects have been available in apps like Instagram and Snapchat for a while, but they were also stuck in those networks. If I wanted to make a fun bounce, I had to do it in Instagram and either share it with everyone or with friends on Instagram.

By adding effects into Live Photos, I can share them outside of my social networks — including with family and friends that want no part of the Facebook or Snapchat scenes.

That bounce of my friend and I tapping champagne glasses at my birthday? That went straight to them over iMessage. Securely. Privately. Not for the world or for the giant data harvesting companies. Just for us.

Especially when it comes to Faces and sync.

When Apple initially re-deployed facial recognition and tagging last year, the company said syncing would come later.

Well, later is now. And the reason it took so long is that Apple wanted to provide the convenience of sync while maintaining the privacy and security of on-device processing — Apple doesn't want to know who your friends and connections are, and I'm supremely thankful for that.

So, what Apple's doing is interesting. To enable face detection, you have to start selecting people you know and then identifying them. At that point, the on-device machine learning and computer vision takes over and starts to add more and more pictures of the identified people to the pool.

When syncing, Apple is only moving over the data you yourself identified. None of the machine learning or computer vision relationships that were built around it. Just your "truth". Then, the synced device rebuilds those relationships locally.

In other words, I tag pictures of my mom on my iPhone, it finds other pictures of my mom on my iPhone to add to her Faces folder on my iPhone. The pictures I tagged are also synced to my Mac, which then also finds other pictures of my mom on my Mac to add to her Faces folder on my Mac.

Apple will have to prove that this implementation works well enough that people who want no part of the massive data harvest that is Google Photos will still find it useful enough to use, and that'll take a while post-launch to really shake out.

Still, privacy is good and options are good, and options for privacy are great.

There's a lot more in Camara and Photos in iOS 11 as well. QR scanning, for example, will let you quickly capture and act on codes. Memories, which was a surprise hit with mainstream users last year, is getting several new types, including: pets, babies, birthdays, sportsball, outdoor activities, driving, night life, performances, anniversaries, weddings, "over the years" (aka "this is your life", "early memories" (aka "glory days"), visits, gatherings, and the one that scares and delights me almost as much as pets — meals.

There's even a stealthy level that fades in when you've got the grid overlay enabled and you go to take a top-down photo of your food, coffee, everyday carry, etc. It's a glorious touch that helps the already composition-obsessed absolutely nail the shot.

iOS 11 iMessage and Apple Pay

iMessage is the most popular app on iOS and, like messaging in general, is increasingly becoming a platform in its own right. That's why Apple has been focusing on messaging almost as much as it has photography: It wants people stuck to iMessage so they remain stuck to iPhone, iPad, and other Apple devices. Inline stickers, effects, and apps were a big part of that strategy over the last few years and continue to be refined in iOS 11.

iMessage has a new interface for choosing apps and stickers which I'm still neither here nor there about. It's better than before but still feels like it clutters up the messaging experience. I don't know a better way to solve for the increasingly cluttered messaging experience in general, though. So, I'll just keep holding to hope that even better is still on the horizon.

There are some new screen effects, including echo which lets you set everything from a chicken head to poop emoji to knives to eggplants (yes, eggplants) swirling around the screen. It's as delightful and terrifying as it sounds.

There still aren't any bubble effects for setting a message on fire or freezing it cold, which I'd love to see. And I still wonder how or even if Apple will keep up with Snapchat and Instagram who seem to offer ever-more-outlandish filters weekly if not daily.

When iPhone X launches in November, though, we will have Animoji to entertain — and spam — our contacts with.

I am the &#128169; and the &#128169; is me! #iPhoneX

A post shared by Rene Ritchie (@reneritchie) on Sep 12, 2017 at 2:29pm PDT

Also on the waiting list is iMessage sync. Apple originally announced the feature would be coming to iMessage for iOS 11 at WWDC back in June but it was pulled at some point during the beta process. I'm hoping it returns in iOS 11.1 or some future release because the implementation looked clever:

Previously, each device got its own unique end-to-end encrypted copy of a message that Apple's servers would attempt to deliver for a week or so and then abandon forever. It was great for security but not so great for convenience and consistency. Over time, invariably, some devices would have some messages and others, especially newer ones, wouldn't.

I was curious how Apple would solve this because the last thing any privacy-conscious person — or Apple itself — wanted was some unencrypted web repository sitting online, ripe for the plucking.

With iMessage sync, all messages remained end-to-end encrypted and, for all intents and purposes, inaccessible to Apple. They were simply collected on the web, in their encrypted form, so Apple could ensure a consistent delivery and experience across devices.

Once the feature actually ships, we'll see if any of that has changed and how well the system holds up to the scrutiny of the infosec community. If Apple is going to stick by its privacy-first policies, though, it's going to have to stick with delivering on them as well.

Another iMessage feature that still has to ship is person-to-person Apple Pay. It wasn't promised for release but for later this fall, so Apple still has some time left. And I'm really hoping they nail it.

I'm lucky to live in a place that's soaking in Apple Pay. I use everywhere I go. So much so that when I can't use it it's like a utility has gone off. Like I've lost power or the internet. I don't carry cash with me anymore and I barely carry cards. The only exception, of course, has been swapping funds with friends and family. They don't exactly walk around with contactless payment terminals around their necks. Most, anyway…

For that, we've had to resort to quick bank machine runs, using PayPal like it's 2007, or relying on a third-party service and app, which isn't always available or set up by everyone. All the while hoping Apple would bring person-to-person payments to Apple Pay. And now they're starting to.

Even though person-to-person Apple Pay is still a short way off, I have had the chance to try it at a demo last month. And it worked well.

You have to approve it first, so someone can't simply spam you with requests for cash and hope to trigger an automated response. (Sorry, colleagues who've tried!). Once it is approved, though, it works intelligently to detect potential triggers and offer itself when and as needed. For example, if Lory Gil messages me that my share of beverages is $42, iMessage could ask me if I want to send it to her right there, right then.

Sending money is also a breeze. You simply tap it out in iMessage or tell Siri, Apple's intelligent voice assistant, who you want to send money to and how much.

If and when you receive money, it goes into an "Apple Pay Cash" card stored in Wallet where you can quickly and easily buffer funds until you decide to make purchases or withdraw to a traditional account.

Being tied to Messages might be inconvenient for people who live in a different service, like WeChat or WhatsApp. For people already in the Apple ecosystem, especially those like my friends and family who only ever use iMessage, it'll be all but effortless. Better still, it's one less service to have to maintain — and one less security and privacy vector to worry about.

That's because, like everything in iMessage, person-to-person Apple Pay is end-to-end encrypted and Apple has absolutely no interest in harvesting, aggregating, and profiting off your transaction data. Who you get money from and who you send money to is your business, not some massive online social search company. And, frankly, that's become just as if not more important to me than the service itself.

Person-to-person Apple Pay will be U.S. only at launch, which is a huge but expected bummer to people like me who live outside the U.S. Hopefully, it'll roll-out to more countries and quickly. Apple's scale generally helps push things out and make them mainstream. Because I want it yesterday.

iOS 11 App Store

Ten years after it was first introduced with iOS 11, the App Store has finally gotten a complete re-imagining. It's more than a makeover because it's more than interface deep: It's a complete rethinking not just of how to present apps for people to browse and search, but how people browse and search for apps.

It starts with the new Today tab. For years Apple has had an amazing team of editors working on surfacing, curating, organizing, and arranging the best of the best apps. But their work was constrained to weekly feature blocks. Now it's open to daily features.

An endless vertical scroll filled with stories, broken up by text, images, videos, and lists, it's rich beyond rich and instantly forces you to reconsider everything you thought you knew about the App Store. It almost reminds me of thumbing through stacks vinyl records, seeing the album art and type fan by. This isn't a digital shelf anymore. It's a multi-faceted digital experience.

There are features, like "Meet the developer", "Our favorites", "Gaming 101", "Behind the scenes", "Collection", "How to", "DIY", and "The daily list". There's also an "App of the day" and "Game of the day". Each gets its own card in the deck. Tap a card and it springs up excitedly to fill the screen. And, where previously App Store editors were limited to tiny blurbs, if that, they now have real space for real prose. It's almost as though Apple has started its own app blog. (That's fine. Everything's fine. We need the competition!)

It's a jaw-dropping achievement, both in terms of the App Store app itself and the Today content that fills it. But it's also a jaw-dropping increase in the scope of the App Store team's workload, text, graphics, and video all. I'm legit exhausted just thinking about how much consistent effort they're going to need to put in, day after day, month after month, year after year, to maintain it.

And I'm curious to find out just how much return the App Store gets on this incredible investment. Today, after all, is a destination. Destinations are great, especially when we're bored and simply want to find the next cool thing to pass our time. But, increasingly, destinations have given way to demand. We want therefore we search. Boredom is less frequently our problem. Finding what we want in a sea of potentials, that's our problem.

Luckily, App Store is getting better at that as well. Gone are the days when searching for "Twetbot" returned no results. Now, it properly returns not only "Tweetbot", but other apps by the same developer, and other apps around the same service (Twitter).

There are, at long last, separate tabs for Apps and Games, so popular apps are no longer buried under the always more massively popular games. That's fine again for browsing, and I'm super glad Apple's done it. But I think we're already in an era where most people come to the App Store not from the tabs but from elsewhere on the internet. They see an app or game on the web or on social and they tap or click straight to it.

Those app and game pages have been redesigned as well, though the interface still struggles to cleanly contain all the elements. (And the use of the "more" (•••) button for pulling up the Share Sheet still causes me to do a double-take.)

As Today builds up more content and that content propagates down to the app and games pages, they should become more visually interesting, engaging, and alive as well. That'll take some time, though.

Evolution of App Store from launch in 2008 (top) to relaunch in 2017 (bottom).

The App Store can even offload apps and games you haven't launched for a while to free up space on your iPhone or iPad. No data is deleted or lost, and you can re-download them at any time. I haven't been able to tell if any of my apps have been offloaded, so it's either taking its time or working brilliantly.

It's clear the redesign was a labor of intense love from Apple, and that Today is evidence of the company's extreme commitment to the platform and developers.

And I'm hoping intensely it pays off for all involved.

iOS 11 QuickType Keyboard

Apple's doing a couple cool things with the iOS keyboard this year. The first is a one-handed keyboard for iPhone. It's not the first time Apple's worked on solving for wider phones but it's the first time they've been happy enough with the solution to ship it. And I'm thankful for that. I've been waiting for it for a while.

There are both left and right-sided versions of the one-handed keyboard. You access them through the same "globe" button that you use to switch keyboards or get to emoji. Getting back to the standard keyboard is even easier. You simply tap the huge arrow on the opposite side.

I wish it were even easier though. I'm guessing edge gestures to invoke and switch the keyboard to one-handed mode and from side to side — which is how split keyboard has always worked on iPad — don't scale down as well. Still, I'd love it if Apple could figure it out since I want to move in and out of one-handed mode a lot.

The second big change is a new "flick"-style keyboard for iPad. It lets you enter alternate characters like numbers and symbols by simply flicking down on the key.

It has an almost old-school typewriter feeling to it but I'm still wondering if flicking down – as opposed to flicking up — was the best choice Apple could make here. Because the alternate characters are not only rendered at the top of the main characters but the area I'm writing on is spatially above the keyboard as well, I still find myself flicking up on occasion. (I have the same problem with Slide Over apps and pulling down rather than pushing up to dock them into Split View apps.)

Like autocorrect, flicking is something you have to get used to and learn to trust, but once you do you can enter mixed text, including passwords and addresses, faster than ever.

Especially since Siri has been amped up to prompt for even more information types, including places, movies, recently viewed items, ETAs, and more.

In my experience, it doesn't work all the time, or at least all the times I'd expect it to, which is slightly frustrating. When it does work its delightfully convenient.

iOS 11 Notes

Notes is my Mind Palace. With Sync. I dump everything I'm working on and want to keep top-of-mind into Notes and it shows up everywhere so I can find and use it anywhere. I do wish I could switch it from rich text to plain text mode — because, nerd — but otherwise, it's become one of my most-used apps. And in iOS 11, it's gotten even better.

Apps have been able to scan and digitize documents for years on iOS, but now Notes has it built in. It doesn't work on highly complex, highly illustrative documents, but for forms and text on a page, it's solid.

If you have an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, Notes is now even better integrated. Instant Notes lets tap the Lock screen with your Pencil and start writing. By default, it kicks you right into a new note but you can tweak that in Settings so that you land on the last Instant note you created or the last note you viewed in the app.

In Notes, you can nudge text aside and start drawing inline, so you can easily mingle text and handwriting. You can even write in English or Simplified Chinese (which I can do at approximately a 1-year-old's level!). It can recognize your scribblings and let you search them as though they were text. Swoon.

If you don't have an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, you can still benefit from the new strikethrough and monospacing styles, and from the ability to pin Notes to the top of the list so really important work — like iOS 11 reviews! — never gets lost under more recent, if more random, notes.

iOS 11 Screenshots and Markup

Markup started life as a humble extension buried away in Mail. No longer. Now, it's everywhere. Screenshots started off as a debugging feature kept alive because Walt Mossberg told Steve Jobs it would be useful for media. Now, they're front and center and tied right into the new Instant Markup system.

Take a screenshot and, instead of it disappearing away into your photo deck, it persists at the bottom left of the screen. Tap on it, and it takes you right into the Markup interface where you can add feedback or, you know, send everything from snarky comments to naughty annotations. (Who needs InstaSnap, right? Just markup responsibly, please, people.)

The overlay interface is at the same time super convenient and kind of annoying. When you want to act on a screenshot immediately, it's right there ready and waiting for you. When you don't, it's still right there, covering the screen, and harshening your Feng Shui. At least until you swipe it off-screen and away or wait a few moments for it to fade. There's no way for the system to know when you actually want a screenshot immediately, and when you're snapping away for later use, so it feels like Apple chose the best implementation possible here.

If you have an iPad Pro and Apple Pencil, you can use Markup even more precisely and easily — simply touch the tip to a document in Files or Mail and annotate away.

Giving instant access to screenshots and making Markup ubiquitous has made the act of capturing, commenting, and sharing visual ideas almost muscle memory for me already. And that makes it almost invaluable.

iOS 11 Siri

Apple was first-to-market with a mainstream digital assistant but the company's lack of early focus and acceleration has allowed Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and others to catch up and, in many people's opinions, race ahead.

Over the course of the last year or so, I've been wondering if Apple wouldn't benefit greatly from a public-facing VP of Siri Experience who has only one job — to sidestep everyone and everything else and make sure Siri is the best damn assistant on the planet, period. Much as Apple does for physical products like iPhone, and much as Phil Schiller has done since taking up that kind of roll at App Store. A little while ago, Apple did something pretty close: The company moved responsibility for Siri over to Craig Federighi's software engineering organization.

Just like it took a while before we saw the App Store pick up speed under Schiller, it'll probably take a while before Siri picks up speed under Federigihi, but iOS 11 is already off to a good start.

New features include a more natural voice with machine-learned inflections and intonations. There's also support for translations from English to Chinese, Spanish, French, German, or Italian. And, something else I've been hoping for over the last few years: the ability to type to Siri for when speaking is inappropriate or impossible. (Though that feature is currently tucked away under Accessibility.)

Siri will also sync what it's learned about you between devices. It doesn't keep a profile of you or your relationships on Apple's servers, the way some other companies do to harvest and monetize your personal information. Instead, it syncs securely, with end-to-end encryption between your devices. Apple doesn't have — and still claims not to want — your data.

New SiriKit domains include task managers and bill payment. Apps can use them to hook into Siri and provide functionality based around a wide range of intents. Still, only two new domains in a year is disappointing. Especially when it doesn't include media domains for music and video. I need to talk to Spotify and Netflix.

Inconsistency remains the biggest frustration. When you ask for something and it just works eight out of ten times, but the other two times it returns something incomprehensibly ridiculous, it's jarring. As someone who uses Siri all day, every day, for everything from controlling my home to dictating my work, if Apple's server-side Siri team did nothing else but stamp out aberrations and improve consistency over the course of the next year, I'd be ecstatic.

The Suggestions interface has also been expanded to include text in Safari, stories from Apple News, and flight status.

There's also a new Siri animation at the bottom of the screen. It's all futuristic and round, which makes it look a lot like Siri on top of Apple's upcoming HomePod. Badass.

iOS 11 ARKit

Screens are great. I love screens. But having to have a screen for my wrist, my pocket, my lap, my desk, and my wall, never mind several of each, gets expensive. One day I hope to have a simple marble-sized device that I keep on me — or implanted in me, shudder — and it constantly authenticates my identity locally and syncs my information with the cloud. Then shows and tells me everything and anything I want, whenever I want, through the infinite screens of augmented reality (AR). That might sound like science fiction, but I'm already seeing a glimpse of that future today, thanks to Apple's ARKit.

Unlike Google, which released a personal screen prototype called Glass and later a phone-based platform called Tango, and Microsoft which made a full-on mixed reality visor called HoloLens, Apple decided not to put the augmented device cart before the platform horse. (I'd guessed as much before WWDC.)

Thanks to the popularity of iPhone and iPad, that instantly gives them not only hundreds of millions of screens to target, but the deepest pool of developer talent on the planet to figure out and test the first use-cases.

Apple takes care of a lot of the heavy lifting up front. ARKit handles figuring out the planes, the lighting, the scaling, and keeping it all as anchored in time and space as possible. With the True Depth camera on iPhone X, ARKit will even handle face mapping. (See Rene as poop emoji, above.)

That lets developers create compelling, immersive AR experiences without having to create all the technology for AR around it. In other words, they get to hit the AR ground not just running but running like The Flash.

I've had a chance to try out a bunch of ARKit apps in various stages of development over the course of the last month or two. Some are upfront about the setup mechanics and tell you to move your iPhone or iPad around while overlaying the dot grids that map the real-world planes to the digital objects that will occupy them. Others gamify the experience, telling you to catch or find something while stealthily scanning as you do. I find both approaches fascinating.

Many of them do some variation of just what you'd expect right now: Let you place rendered objects in the environment, be they chairs on your floor, lipstick on your face, castles on your coffee tables, or starfighters in your driveway, and then inspect and interact with them for education, commerce, or just plain fun. Others, which let you do things like opening a door in a real library to access a fantasy or far-flung-future library, are brain-boggling.

Like with any framework Apple introduces ahead of first-party products and software, though, it'll take some time for the augmented dust to settle, the obvious realities to fall away, and the truly transformative experiences to emerge.

For now, though, I expect I'll be spending the better part of next year with AirPods in my ears and an iPhone or iPad in front of my face, ARKit augmenting my reality beyond anything I can imagine now.

And I can't wait.

iOS 11 Core ML

Machine Learning is basically Tinder for computers: Yes. No. No. No. Yes. Yes. No. Yes. No. It's how Apple trained the Neural Engine block on the A11 Bionic chipset for iPhone X, how it taught Photos to recognize mountains without having to suck up all your personal photos, and how Siri is getting its new, more naturally inflected voice.

Core ML is how Apple bundled all that up and made it available to developers. Like ARKit, it means apps can access the power of machine learning without their coders having to expend the time and effort of building out all the frameworks all by themselves. It's also been called PDF-like, in that Core ML can ingest a wide range of different ML models, serving as a common ground.

There's also a Vision application programming interface (API), to apply Computer Vision, to apps. That likewise lets apps ingest and understand photos without having to engineer the process themselves. And a Natural Language Processing API for ingesting and understanding words and phrases. (There's even GamePlayKit for learned decision trees in games.)

All of this technology accomplishes the same basic thing: It lets Apple handle the grunt work so developers can concentrate on what makes their apps unique and compelling.

And that's kind of what ML, CV, and related technologies do for us as well.

I've gotten to try a few Core ML-based apps over the last couple of months as well. The best ones do a lot of work behind the scenes so that you have less to do in front of the interface.

For example, let's say you're selling your house and you want to show it off as best as possible. You may not have done all the research or gotten all the experience necessary to know which photos do precisely that. But an ML model sourced from massive amounts of real estate agents might. So, you load up the dozens of photos you took, the CV framework figures out what they all are, and the ML model arranges them so the bright, welcoming living room is up front and the darker, smaller bathroom is buried third from last.

You can tweak from there but you no longer have to start from scratch and do all the grunt work yourself. The machine has done it for you because it was trained to do just exactly that for you.

Yes, I realize we're starting to talk about devices more like pets than like objects, and yes, Terminator and Matrix have made sure I'm suitably creeped out by that. Computers have always been about convenience, though. And Machine Learning is the next leap forward in convenience.

iOS 11 Miscellany

iOS 11 is one of Apple biggest releases to date and that means it's chocked full of new and updated features. Everyone will have their favorites and the ones that are most impactful to their own workflows and experiences. Here are some of the bigger ones.

Apple Music is becoming more social but without any of the baggage that came with Ping or Connect. You can simply follow people and be followed, see what friends are listening to, and jam along as you do. I wish App Store would add this so hard.

Podcasts, which has long been tied to but seldom been in sync with the Music app, has caught up again with a big, bold, and beautiful redesign all its own. It looks and works great. Which is good because, thanks to the continued lack of SiriKit support for media, it remains the only fully integrated option on iPhone and iPad.

The Maps app is getting indoor mapping for malls and airports. Just a few to start, because the process is arduous, but more on the way. Lane guidance, light guidance, and speed limits are also being added to navigation — and to CarPlay — hurray. And yeah, you can drag and drop from and to Maps. Awesome.

There's a new Do Not Disturb while Driving feature that I think is important, especially as more jurisdictions pass much-needed distracted driving laws. I'm not sure DND is the right solution, though. It's so cut off it leads me to believe many will choose to ignore it. Maybe that it exists is enough. Still, I'd like to see Apple do what Google did with Android Auto and make an iPhone version of the CarPlay interface available — minus all the infotainment integrations, of course — to anyone with a car mount. That might just keep you safe even if you need to stay connected.

HomeKit can control speakers — interesting, with the coming of Apple's HomePod — as well as sprinklers and faucets. There are also expanded triggers, so you can automate better, and easier accessory setup via NFC and QR code scanning.

Speaking of HomePod, AirPlay 2 will let you do multi-room audio with a shared Up Next queue. Developers can add support for it to their own services and devices — your move, Sonos!

The News app is more personal, smarter, can show video on its widget, and gives breaking news more attention. It's still not available outside its tiny handful of launch countries, though, which is incredibly disappointing. Apple pushed Apple Music out to 100 countries on day one. I'd love to see even a score or two more for news some two years later.

Mail has top hits, which I'm also still not sold on. It's convenient when its engagement engine nails exactly what you're looking for. Trouble is, I'm mostly looking for stuff like order info and fringe emails that I'm least engaged with. I'm a dinosaur, but I think I preferred my raw list of results.

Health can now sync your data between devices, and that sync is enabled by default in iCloud Settings. Lack of sync was one of biggest headaches for users switching between or upgrading devices, so that's great to see.

Safari now uses Machine Learning to try and prevent web advertisers from tracking you across multiple sites. It won't mean less ads but it will mean ads won't be able to gather as much information about you, both for advertisers and for targeting ads. Google's AMP proxying is also being stripped out when you go to retrieve a link. Thank goodness.

There's a new Accounts & Passwords section in Settings which, in addition to serving as a single, unified location to get to your iCloud, Google, Microsoft, and other services, provides a list of your current iCloud Keychain app and web passwords. You have to authorize with Touch ID or Passcode to see them, which is great.

There's also some facility now to require Touch ID or Passcode authorization before you can access iCloud Keychain passwords in apps. It's a good first step but only iPhone X and Face ID implement it the way I really want it: With authorization required before every fill. iPhones with Touch ID only required authorization when you add them to apps, at least for now. I hope Apple comes around on this and makes it ubiquitous. Convenience is always at war with security but unless and until security wins this one, I can't hand an older iPhone to a friend or person in need. And that's unfortunate.

Wi-Fi sharing lets you securely, invisibly pass along your Wi-Fi credentials to your contacts, so they can get online and you can stop worrying about resetting everything when that sketchy cousin or acquaintance finally leaves… It works something like Automatic Setup where you need to bring the visiting device near your device to share the credentials. And it's a great feature to have.

There's still no dark mode or ThemeKit for iOS, even with the advent of the OLED-based iPhone X. Which is sad. There is a new Smart Invert for Accessibility, though. Instead of simply inverting all colors, which ruins things like photos, Smart Invert can switch text from white on black to black on white, but leave photos uninverted. But, there's still no dark mode or ThemeKit in iOS. At least not this year.

SOS mode lets you call for help or simply disable Touch ID (or the upcoming Face ID) by clicking the power/side button 5 times in succession. This is the kind of feature that saves lives and protects data, and I'm thrilled Apple brought it from Apple Watch to iPhone. (Apple says it will also work by squeezing both sides of iPhone, but that still just reboots for me.)

AirPod can now have separate actions assigned to the left and right pods, including Siri, play/pause, next, and previous. So, for example, you could set Siri activation for the left pod and song skipping for the right. It adds a small amount of complexity but offers a huge increase in functionality. Well done.

Core NFC will let developers read from — but not write from — the near-field communications system on iPhone and iPads. That means some clever things could be done with tags but no full-fledged Apple Pay-like bidirectional systems can be built.

And the list goes on and on.

iOS 11 Conclusion

iOS 11 still doesn't have everything — no iCloud multi-user for iPad, re-assignable default apps, "Read This" accessibility, ThemeKit customizations, music and many other integrations for SiriKit, Apple TV and CarPlay on-board, Lock screen complications, and the list goes on and on.

What iOS 11 does have is far greater power without too much additional complexity and far more convenience without hurting approachability. It focuses on a few core things across a wide range of apps and services and ultimately comes together to do exactly what we've come to expect it to do — help us better manage and accelerate our lives.

Each year, every year, some expect Apple to slow down and shore up the foundations. Others expect the company to speed up and push the innovation. This year, we've gotten a good mix of both. At WWDC, Craig Federighi said, in addition to new and updated feature implementation, Apple gave the software engineering teams some time to fix what irked them most. I think it shows. And I think it's a great approach to carry Apple through iOS 11 and into the next decade.

What we get at launch is just the first stage of iOS 11. iPhone 8 will bring the beta for Portrait Lighting iPhone X will introduce a few additional features, like Animoji and Face ID. Future versions, including updates later in the year and into early next year, should improve and round things out further.

For now, what we have is iOS taken to 11. Smarter thanks to machine learning and computer vision. Better thanks to drag and drop and Files. Faster thanks to Automatic setup and Instant Notes and Markdown. And Bolder thanks to headlong dive into augmented reality.

And it's available now.

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iPhone 8 reviews

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

iPhone 8 reviews are out and here's what you need to know!

iPhone 8 reviews began going live this morning, the result of many members of the media having spent just shy of a week with Apple's iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. The takeaway so far is that it's a solid update with the good new features but it looks too much like previous generation iPhones for some, especially with iPhone X on the horizon.

John Gruber, writing for Daring Fireball:

I was tempted to write this review under the conceit that there was no such thing as the iPhone X. Just don't even mention the iPhone X, and consider the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus as though they were the only two new phones coming from Apple this year. That conceit would work, insofar as the iPhones 8 are excellent year-over-year upgrades compared to their iPhone 7 counterparts.

But ignoring the iPhone X would actually do an injustice to the 8 and 8 Plus, because so much of what is inside the X is also inside the 8's. These phones are in no way shape or form1 some sort of half-hearted or minor update over the iPhone 7.

Jim Dalrymple, writing for The Loop:

There is nothing I didn't like about the iPhone 8 or iPhone 8 Plus. It's more powerful, has better cameras, Portrait Lighting, better Portrait Mode, Wireless charging, a better display, True Tone, and iOS 11.

These are just a great devices that I would not hesitate to recommend.

Jordan Kahn, writing for 9to5Mac:

If you're keeping track, the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus could have (should have?) been the iPhone 7s and 7s Plus, but after spending time with them, wireless charging, the new glass design, and notable camera upgrades feel worthy of the iPhone 8 branding. And for those that could care less about the iPhone X's OLED display and Face ID, iPhone 8 and 8 Plus offer a ton more value for money with a traditional look and feel.

Mark Spoonauer, writing for Tom's Guide:

The $699 iPhone 8 and $799 iPhone 8 Plus represent a leap forward in performance and camera quality, but I wish they came in packages that looked and felt more "new." That's why I'm personally waiting for the $999 iPhone X, which also adds Face ID and a more colorful OLED screen. Still, both iPhones 8 have very good LCD screens, better sound than their prededessors, wireless charging and strong battery life — and for more accessible prices, to boot.

Matthew Panzarino, writing for TechCrunch:

As far as a consumer goes, however, the iPhone 8 is the easy traditional choice this year. It's got nearly every technical enhancement that the iPhone X has outside of the TrueDepth camera and OLED screen. I think the mental calculus on this one is probably closer than it's ever been, but the framework is roughly the same: If you're the kind of person who buys the high end iPhone every year then wait for the iPhone X. With the one added caveat of if the notch for the depth camera on the front of the X offends you, well you have most of the major tech right in the iPhone 8.

Nilay Patel, writing for The Verge:

But Apple will ship millions of iPhone 8s — to people on upgrade plans, people who don't want to pay $999 for an iPhone X or wait for what seems like limited availability, and people who just need a new phone without thinking about it too much. If the iPhone X is Apple's bold vision of the future, the iPhone 8 is Apple making sure everyone else at the party has a nice time too. If you know what an iPhone is and you want one, then the iPhone 8 is exactly that, one tick farther down the line. It's an iPhone.

Chris Velazco, writing for Engadget:

When I first picked up the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, I immediately decided they were actually just the iPhone 7s and 7s Plus. I was wrong: They're definitely much more than that. They're just saddled with a less exciting design. If you subscribe to the maxim that it's what's inside that really counts, the 8 and 8 Plus are big improvements. They pack more storage, great cameras, improved software and absolutely first-rate performance into some highly familiar packages. The iPhone X will continue to suck the air out of the room for the foreseeable future, but one thing has become clear after my week of testing: They might not have the X's style, but the 8 and 8 Plus are truly excellent phones that won't let Apple die-hards and new customers down.

David Pierce, writing for Wired:

If you want an awesome iPhone, this is it. I'd recommend the 8 Plus, if you can stomach the size, because the added camera power and battery life are really nice to have. But both are fantastic phones, upgrades over even last year's model. But if you want to be part of the future, save your money for now. Then go get an iPhone X and see what's really coming next.

David Phelan, writing for The Independant:

The display is noticeably better thanks to the addition of True Tone for more faithful colours in any lighting condition and the camera is improved on both sizes of phone.

But on the iPhone 8 Plus, it's especially spectacular, offering images which can sometimes match the richness and detail of a DSLR camera, but from a device which still fits in your pocket.

All in a gadget which looks like an excited iPhone 7, refreshed in its best party get-up.

Scott Stein, writing for CNET:

The iPhone 8 Plus is a superlative phone with a spectacular camera, but wait for the upcoming iPhone X before buying: it promises to fold all of the key features of the 8 Plus into a smaller, sexier package.

James Titcomb, writing for The Telegraph:

For most Apple users, the real decision is which iPhone to buy, and if you aren't interested in shelling out for the X, the 8 is your new best option. Should you rush out and buy it? Probably not. If you need a new iPhone, is it a worthy upgrade? Certainly.

Geoff Fowler, writing for The Wall Street Journal:

The virtues I see in the iPhone 8 are niche: I'm glad you don't have to spend $1,000 to get an improved camera and processor and even wireless charging, if that matters to you. But Apple's confusing iPhone family now includes three pairs of practically identical phones: the regular and Plus versions of the iPhone 8, 7 and 6s. Don't buy the spendiest one.

Ed Baig, writing for USA Today:

For many potential buyers, especially those with an older iPhone looking to upgrade, the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus represents a solid purchase option. But I'm holding out for the next "latest" iPhone, the looming iPhone X.

Farhad Manjoo, writing for The New York Times:

So here's my conclusion, after nearly a week testing the 8 and 8 Plus: The 8s feel like a swan song — or, to put it another way, they represent Apple's platonic ideal of that first iPhone, an ultimate refinement before eternal retirement.

Josh McConnell, writing for The Financial Post:

I've been using the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus as my daily day-to-day devices for a week now. Though they may not be as compelling of an upgrade for users of last year's iPhone 7 models, those who have been using one of the iPhone 6 family of phones or older will want to take note if they need a new device without paying the steeper iPhone X price.

David Pogue, writing for Yahoo:

The gadget world is buzzing about Apple's upcoming iPhone X, which it unveiled last week.

Good thing, too—because if Apple (AAPL) hadn't unveiled the iPhone X, there'd be no buzzing at all. The other phone Apple unveiled that day, the iPhone 8, is a very minor upgrade indeed.

Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson, writing for news.com.au:

Apple's iPhone 8 and 8 Plus are likeable phones, and a step up on the models they replace.

There are also solid reasons to buy them. If you're a fan of Apple and fingerprint scanners, this is your best option now and longer if Face ID takes over.

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Owning the iPhone X horns

Posted on September 18, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Apple chose specifically not to hide the horns on iPhone X. Even if you can never not see them.

The "notch" and "flap", or as Apple refers to it internally (and casually) as the ears and forehead — though it will forever be &#129304; (horns) to me — are the most distinctive visual design element of the upcoming iPhone X. So much so that they, and not the now-deleted Home button, are what distinguish the next-generation iPhone in next-generation icons and glyphs.

Marco Arment:

This is the new shape of the iPhone. As long as the notch is clearly present and of approximately these proportions, it's unique, simple, and recognizable.

It's probably not going to significantly change for a long time, and Apple needs to make sure that the entire world recognizes it as well as we could recognize previous iPhones.

That's why Apple has made no effort to hide the notch in software, and why app developers are being told to embrace it in our designs.

Being distinct — iconic, even — is a huge plus in terms of brand recognition. But whether that recognition is good or bad, admired or derided, is another matter.

John Gruber, writing for Daring Fireball:

My objection (again, after admittedly only spending 10-15 minutes with an iPhone X in hand) remains that Apple could embrace the notch on the lock and home screens, allowing for this new iconic silhouette, without embracing it all the time.

I suspect (or maybe it's just hope) what might happen is something along the lines of the evolution of the new look-and-feel that debuted in iOS 7.

How Apple handles the horns may well change over time. Technology may allow it or even force it to change. For now, though, Apple is all in.

Take every mockup and alternative you've seen on Twitter or on blogs, multiply it by a score or two, and that's how many Apple likely dreamt up and tested long before anyone even heard the iPhone X project.

Some of them didn't work for practical reasons, others simply weren't to the team's taste or objectives. So, horns. Almost everywhere: horns.

There are a few custom interface elements, like the Now Playing card in Music or Drafts in Mail, where the visual cue for the layering is considered important enough that it pushes the horns back and they get blacked out. Otherwise, the horns win.

As compromises go, it's a big one. And it's one that, even after spending the better part of half an hour or more with several demo iPhones X following Apple's event, still stands out at me.

(Every bit as much as the "flat tire" on the Moto 360. Though Apple, at least, had enough marketing sense not to name the device the iPhone Hornless...)

If you really hate the horns, there's an iPhone 8 for you. It has almost all the new features with nary a horn in sight. Otherwise, come November, you, me, and everyone else outside Apple gets to try iPhone X, horns and all, and decide for ourselves.

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How to force quit apps on the Apple Watch

Posted on September 16, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How do you force an Apple Watch app to quit and restart? Here's the button combo!

You can kill any Apple Watch app at any time by force quitting it. Though the implementation differs slightly, the idea is the same as the iPhone or iPad. More importantly, it's every bit as simple and easy to do.

How to kill Apple Watch apps

Note: You have to be in the app you want to force quit before starting.

  1. Press and hold down the side button until the shutdown screen appears.
  2. Press and hold the Digital Crown to force quit the active app.

If force quitting apps didn't alleviate the problem, you can always reboot your Apple Watch. Historically, that's scared a lot of software straight.

Updated September 2017: Updated for watchOS 4.

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Should you get AppleCare+ for your Apple Watch?

Posted on September 14, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Do you need AppleCare+ for your Apple Watch, or is standard AppleCare enough? Here's the deal!

For all new Apple Watch and Apple Watch Nike+ purchases, users receive a one-year limited AppleCare warranty on hardware repairs and 90 days of free technical support. The company's optional AppleCare+ service plan extends the hardware warranty and technical support to two years, and adds coverage for up to two incidents of accidental damage — though there's an additional service fee for those.

Apple Watch Hermès and Apple Watch Edition come with two years of AppleCare standard, but that can be extended to three years via AppleCare+ with the same two-incident fee. But is it worth it?

AppleCare vs. AppleCare+

Anyone and everyone who buys an Apple Watch or Apple Watch Nike+ from Apple automatically gets the standard level of AppleCare for free, which includes:

  • 1 year limited hardware warranty
  • 90 days of free technical support

Anyone who buys an Apple Watch Hermès or Apple Watch Edition from Apple also gets the standard level of AppleCare for free, though it lasts much longer:

  • 2 years limited hardware warranty
  • 2 years of free technical support

If you run into problems setting up or using your Apple Watch during the first three months of ownership (two years for Apple Watch Hermès or Edition), you can call 1-800-APL-CARE and they'll help you troubleshoot. If any part of the device fails during the first year (two years for Apple Watch Hermès or Edition), and it's not due to accidental or intentional damage, Apple will likewise replace it.

For example, if the digital crown stops spinning or the screen won't come on, you're covered. If you drop it and break it or take it in the swimming pool and short it out, you're on your own.

Unless you have AppleCare+.

AppleCare+

For an additional $49 fee, AppleCare+ for Apple Watch provides the following:

  • 2 years limited hardware warranty
  • 2 years of free technical support
  • 2 incidents of accidental damage (subject to a $69 service fee)

For $99 extra, AppleCare+ for Apple Watch Hermès and Apple Watch Edition offers:

  • 3 years limited hardware warranty
  • 3 years of free technical support
  • 2 incidents of accidental damage (subject to a $79 service fee)

This way, you get technical support from 1-800-APL-CARE for two full years (three years for Apple Watch Hermès or Edition); if, say, the strap mechanism gets stuck or the side button gets loose and it's not due to accidental or deliberate damage, Apple will likewise replace it for two years (three years for Apple Watch Hermès or Edition).

If it is due to accidental damage, like dropping and cracking the screen, or soaking and shorting the electronics, Apple will still replace it — up to two separate incidents — for the cost of an additional service charge.

AppleCare+ service fee

If you use either of the two accidental damage incidents that come with AppleCare+, there's an additional charge. Currently, that charge is:

  • $69 for Apple Watch or Apple Watch Nike+
  • $79 for Apple Watch Hermès or Apple Watch Edition

This is likely because Hermès bands and ceramic casings are slightly more expensive to service.

AppleCare+ vs. credit card benefits

Some credit cards offer warranty extensions as an incentive to use them for major electronic purchases. For example, some will offer an additional year of coverage — provided by the credit card company, not the vendor — on any purchase made on that card. Some will even cover loss or theft, which is not covered by AppleCare+.

If you don't want to pay extra for AppleCare+ and don't mind how the credit card companies handle the extra year of coverage, it's something to consider. Just check your policy carefully and make sure you're fully informed about not only what the company covers but how it covers it.

Who shouldn't get AppleCare+?

If...

  • you're tight on cash and simply can't afford it
  • you consider yourself exceptionally lucky and have never had a new device fail or get damaged
  • you have added protection from your credit card company or another source
  • you plan to buy additional or updated Apple Watches so frequently you doubt anything bad will ever have time to happe

... then you might not want to get AppleCare+.

Who should get AppleCare+?

If you...

  • don't mind paying for peace of mind
  • often find devices fail on you or you're always dropping or otherwise damaging them
  • don't have or don't trust credit card company protection
  • plan to keep your Apple Watch for more than a year

... then you might want to get AppleCare+.

See at Apple

Still undecided about AppleCare+?

If you're still not sure whether you need AppleCare+, dive into our Apple Watch help and discussion forums. Once you decide, let me know what you decided and why!

Updated September 2017: Updated with latest pricing and Series 3 information.

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Should you buy an Apple Watch?

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Is Apple Watch worth it? From fitness to Apple Pay, notifications to home automation, here's what you need to know before you buy!

These days, you need a computer that fits in your pocket. That's what makes iPhone so popular. You probably also still need a computer for your lap or your desk. But a computer for your wrist? That feels more like an accessory at best, and extravagance at worst. Yet Apple Watch has a few features that can make it indispensable.

Whether you should get an Apple Watch or not comes down to how compelling any of the main features are for your lifestyle, either by themselves or when combined together. Those features include not only timekeeping but health and fitness tracking, notifications and communications, Apple Pay and HomeKit automation. And the Apple Watch does currently require an iPhone to set up, so if you're on Android, it's time to decide whether a smartwatch matters enough in your life to switch.

Put simply: The Apple Watch is the shuttlecraft to an iPhone's starship. Most of what you can do on Watch, you can also do on iPhone — but not as conveniently. And convenience can be a killer feature.

For timekeeping

It's not an uncommon story: You stopped wearing a watch because your iPhone had a big clock right on the Lock screen, only a pocket- or bag-pull away. It's the old single- vs. multi-tasker debate, and why convergent devices like the iPhone proved so popular in the first place.

The Apple Watch is also a convergent device, and that convergence can be seen in every aspect, including how it tells time. When you want to see the clock on your Apple Watch, you don't have to dig into your pocket or reach for your bag. You simply turn your wrist, the screen lights up, and you can view the time and date. It can be just that simple or, in the grand tradition of timekeeping, you can add "complications".

The Watch's faces range from minimal to chronometer to utilitarian to motion graphics to astronomy to, well, Mickey and Minnie Mouse. Each face also includes a number of complications which offer even more data, if you want to enable them.

Complications can include features as subtle as a monogram for personalization, but also world clocks, alarms, a stopwatch, the weather, sunrise and sunset, activity levels, phases of the moon, upcoming appointments, and stock quotes.

You can have complications for your apps as well, so you can see your ETA, access your voice recorder, see sports scores, measure your activity, or even tell how much distance is left before your Pokémon eggs hatch. (Seriously.)

If that level of efficiency is intriguing to you, the Apple Watch might be just intriguing to you.

For notifications

You already get notifications on your iPhone. You can tell when they come in thanks to the beep, buzz, or bubble on your Lock screen. With the Apple Watch, however, those notifications can appear on your wrist, sending you a subtle tap that doesn't even light up the display unless you turn the Watch to signal your interest.

Then, you only get a short summary of the information, providing the app name along with a brief bit of context. From there, you get to decide if you want to stop what you're doing and view more.

There's also a Notification Center, just like on iPhone, so you can swipe down and glance at everything and anything that's come in and quickly see what's happening and what, potentially, you need to take care of. And you can do it without reaching into your pocket or bag.

Facebook messages, turn-by-turn directions, airplane boarding passes, coffee cards, and other app interactions can benefit from being more easily accessible. If that appeals to you, Apple Watch might appeal to you.

For health and fitness

Apple has recently re-focused Watch marketing around health and fitness and it's no mystery as to why. With a heart-rate monitor built-in and GPS on the latest Series 3 models, Apple Watch makes for a compelling exercise and wellness companion.

You automatically track all the basics, including standing and moving around as well as exercise, steps, and stairs climbed.

There's also a Workout app that's been specifically created to track your walks, runs, rides, rolls, and more. With improved water resistance for Series 2 and 3, you can even track your swims and get detailed maps of your routes on land and sea.

With Activity Sharing, you share your achievements with the people closest to you. That way, when you reach a goal or they do, you can send a message or emoji to encourage them. Or to trash talk them. Whatever works for you.

Strava, Nike+, RunKeeper, and most other popular exercise apps have extensions for Apple Watch as well: You get to add the convenience of Apple Watch to whatever system and community you're already involved with.

If any of those features could help you live a healthier, fitter life, the Apple Watch might be all the help you need.

For Apple Pay

Apple Pay on Apple Watch is magic. Instead of having to fumble for your wallet or even your iPhone, you simply press a button on your Apple Watch, hold it close to the terminal, and you're done. What makes it so great is that it's always right there on your wrist, it never reveals your real credit card number or personal information, and if it loses contact with your skin (via the heart rate monitor), it shuts off so no one else can use it.

In many countries, tap to pay is already ubiquitous. In the U.S., it's still rolling out. If you have a lot of tap-to-pay near you, the Apple Watch is especially compelling.

For communication

Apple Watch has basic phone and messaging features built right in, which makes it feel like something straight out of science fiction. It's incredibly convenient, especially if you have a bigger iPhone you typically leave on a table or in a bag. When any call or message comes in, rather than scrambling for it, you can simply glance at your wrist.

For short conversations or replies, you can talk or text right from your watch. For longer communications, you can start on your watch and smoothly transition to your phone, or you can just go get your phone once you see who's calling and messaging on your wrist. You can even dictate or hand write short messages on Apple Watch, which makes it remarkably effective for quickly communicating on the go.

Series 3's GPS + Cellular model takes this one step further, letting you call, communicate, dictate, or write even when your iPhone is far away. Send a message on a boat in the middle of a lake or look up a friend's location while walking over to their place — whatever your heart desires, the Series 3 GPS + Cellular model lets you do it with or without your iPhone nearby.

If keeping in touch matters to you, the Apple Watch just might be the right touch for your wrist.

Remote control

The Apple Watch will let you control your Apple TV. It'll also let you remotely access your iPhone's camera, and thanks to Siri and HomeKit integration, it can even control the lights, thermometer, blinds, fans, and other connected devices in your home.

The possibilities for the Apple Watch are boundless. Not only does it mean never having to get up to turn off your lights, it means not even having to reach for your phone. You can adjust anything in your setup, right from your wrist.

Who shouldn't get an Apple Watch

If you...

  • don't like watches or already have a traditional watch you'd never want to take off
  • would rather reach for your iPhone or don't have an iPhone at all
  • simply want to wait for a future generation to see where wrist computing goes

... you probably don't want or need an Apple Watch.

Who should get an Apple watch

If...

  • you want to spend less time on your iPhone and more time out and about
  • the idea of super-convenient tap-to-pay and fitness tracking appeals to you
  • you want to be able to glance at a call or message before deciding whether to reach for your phone — or avoid reaching at all
  • you want to experiment with the future right now, today

... you probably want to try out an Apple Watch.

See at Apple

Still undecided about Apple Watch?

If you're still not sure about whether you should get an Apple Watch or not, check out our Apple Watch Forums for expert help and discussion. Also remember: You can visit an Apple Store if you have one nearby starting September 22 and try a Series 3 Apple Watch out. You can even buy it, use it in your daily life for a week or so, keep it if you love it, and return it if you don't.

Updated September 2017: Pros and cons updated to reflect all the latest hardware and software features.

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How to (virtually) try on both Apple Watch sizes with the Apple Store App

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

If you're having trouble deciding between the 38mm and 42mm Apple Watch sizes, Apple has made a way for you to try them on — virtually!

Apple won't have Series 3 Apple Watch models in its stores until September 22, but if you want to get a sense of how both Apple Watch cases might look on your wrist right now, you can use the Apple Store app to have a "virtual" try-on. It's not obvious how to get there, but once you know where it is, you can switch between options and see how 38mm and 48mm sizes in aluminum, steel, and gold fit.

How to "try on" an Apple Watch with the Apple Store app

  1. Launch the Apple Store app from your iPhone's home screen.
  2. Tap the Shop tab.
  3. Select the Watch collection from the list.
  4. Choose which Series you want to view.
  5. Select an Apple Watch you want to try on.

  6. Scroll down to the Compare case sizes in the middle and tap on it.
  7. Toggle between 38mm or 42mm.
  8. Put your iPhone on your wrist and see how it looks!

The Apple Store app does a surprisingly good job of simulating the way the Apple Watch sizes look on your wrist (though it's no ARKit demo). If you like both sizes, however, and still can't decide which one is for you, try weighing your decision via our buyers' guide:

Read our breakdown on who should get the 38mm and who should get the 42mm Apple Watch

Happy sizing!

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Which Apple Watch color should you get: Silver, gold, gray, black, or white ceramic?

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Silver, gold, rose gold, space gray, space black, or the all new ceramic white — here's how to pick the perfect Apple Watch color for you!

Apple Watch is the first major tech product to truly blur the lines with fashion. That's because watches have never just been about telling time. They've been about making a statement. As much gadget as jewelry, we don't carry them — we wear them. And that means the color you pick is about as personal a decision as you can make.

If you're on the fence about which finish to pick up, here's what you need to consider!

Bands and lugs

Most individual Apple Watch bands have polished stainless steel lugs. There are a few exceptions: The Sport, Woven Nylon, Sport Loop, and Leather Loop options all have lugs matching their band color, while the Ceramic bands come with ceramic lugs. There are also third-party options for switching lug colors after you buy, or lugs you can purchase to DIY up your own Apple Watch band. But on the whole, Apple Watch band lugs primarily match the stainless steel Apple Watch.

The lack of perfectly matching lugs bothers some people a lot; others, not at all. I've used and worn almost every color Apple Watch over the past few years and I fall somewhere in the middle. It irks me when the lugs don't match, but it's not a deal-breaker for bands that I love.

Even so, silver stainless steel is the finish I've stuck with the most and for this very reason.

If you want your Apple Watch to blend seamlessly into the widest range of bands possible, go with stainless steel; if you don't care how you pair, or you only ever buy bands with colored lugs, go for whichever finish you like.

Discoloration doubts

No matter which Apple Watch finish you get, one thing you don't have to worry about is discoloration. The silver Apple Watch finishes are coated aluminum and stainless steel, and those colors aren't going anywhere.

The Edition is white, but it's white ceramic. While that's new for Apple, white ceramic isn't new for watches. I've been wearing a white Edition for months and it's still as pristine as fresh-fallen snow.

Likewise, all the space grays, silvers, and golds we've tested over the last couple of years have all kept their colors exactly — and we expect the gray ceramic to do the same.

Bottom line: If you're worried about an Apple Watch with a white or light finish staining or discoloring or the dark finishes fading, don't be. They're fine.

Withstanding wear

The base-price Apple Watch options (Series 1, GPS-only Series 3, GPS + Cellular aluminum Series 3, and all the Nike+ models) offer anodized aluminum finishes in silver, space gray, and gold. Apple's anodization manages to be tougher than most, without looking gloppy. That said, aluminum is metal and can be scratched and chipped.

Small scratches have less contrast on silver anodized aluminum, which makes them harder to see depending on lighting. Gold is somewhere in the middle, while space gray has a higher contrast, so scratches are a bit more noticeable.

The mid-range GPS + Cellular Series 3 and Hermès watches come in polished stainless steel (and space black stainless steel) options. Polished stainless steel is far tougher than aluminum, and also makes scratches hard to see, while the space black steel option has a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating that's about as tough as it gets. I've sometimes seen what I thought were scratches on my space black Apple Watch only to realize it was some other metal or concrete the watch scratched off. Yeah.

You can get surface scratches on steel, but they're easily buffed out.

Ceramic and gray ceramic are both likewise incredibly resistant to scratches and scrapes — even tougher (and lighter on the wrist) than stainless steel.

If you hate the look of scratches, you're going to want to look at stainless steel, ceramic, or silver anodized aluminum. If you don't mind — or even love — the look of worn tech, go full Millennium Falcon and get whatever color you like.

Coolness concerns

How much bling is your wrist thing? Some prefer their gadget jewelry understated, with silver aluminum or polished stainless steel providing an elegant but not too fussy look. Space gray aluminum and ceramic is even more chill: Dark, but not too dark.

It's the space black that's full on blackout: It's so trendy it borders on classic at this point, but especially when paired with the OLED display on Apple Watch, it really works.

The Series 1 and 3's slightly copper gold color puts fashion in front of tech. It's not in-your-face bold gold or ruby rose, but rather an understated, slightly rosy gold aluminum.

The white ceramic is a different beast: In some light, in brief glances, it can be mistaken for silver. On closer examination, though, it's clearly white. Not 1970s belt white either. High-end horology white.

If you don't want to draw too much attention to your wrist, stick to silver aluminum or polished stainless steel. If you want to be different but not too daring, try space gray or space black. If bling is your thing, so is gold. And if you want to stand out without shouting out, go ceramic white.

Who should get the silver aluminum or polished stainless steel Apple Watch?

If you want a color that isn't dark but doesn't call a lot of attention to itself and doesn't scream scuffs and scrapes, these are your colors. The aluminum and polished stainless steel watches will match (or closely match) most lugs and lets the bands be the stars.

See at Apple


Who should get the space gray aluminum, grey ceramic, or space black Apple Watch?

If you want a color that makes the Apple Watch display melt away, that will never be too bright or distracting, and in the case of the space black, is full-on "blackout" and will scratch most of the universe before it gets scratched, stick with the spaces.

See at Apple


Who should get the gold aluminum Apple Watch?

If you like the luxury look, think watches should be more like jewelry, don't mind the middle ground when it comes to how wear and tear shows, and want a little dazzle on your wrist, get the gold aluminum Apple Watch.

See at Apple


Who should get the white ceramic Apple Watch?

If you want a look that really stands out without trying too hard, that's incredibly scratch-resistant, or you're just hankering for something bold and don't mind paying for the privilege, get the white ceramic Apple Watch Edition.

See at Apple


Still undecided?

If you're still not sure about which color you should get, jump into our Apple Watch forums and the best community on the web will happily help you out.

At the end of the day, the only real answer is your own gut. Get the color you like best; nothing else matters. Just close your eyes, picture your Apple Watch on your wrist, and focus down on the color you're picturing. Then buy that. Try it out. And remember: You have two weeks to exchange it if you change your mind.

Once you've decided, tell me — which one are you getting?

Updated September 2017: Updated for Apple Watch Series 3.

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AirPods rumor roundup: Everything you need to know

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

What's new with AirPods? Are they changing, getting new colors, going on sale? Here's the latest news on Apple's AirPods!

September 14, 2017: AirPods wireless charging case may launch in December, cost $69

Apple at its September iPhone event announced an updated wireless charging case for AirPods. The case — which, save for a repositioned LED charging light, looks nearly identical to the current AirPods case — will feature wireless charging capabilities, letting you charge your AirPods and the case by placing it on a charging pad. Despite mentioning the new case, however, Apple didn't give us a clear date or price for the updated design.

MacRumors cites "information reportedly sourced from Apple Switzerland" that suggests we'll see the new wireless charging case this December and it'll reportedly run you $69. The publication points to AirPods case replacement costs as a potential indicator of the rumor's validity:

Apple's out-of-warranty fee to repair or replace the AirPods charging case is $69, so a similar price point for the wireless charging version does make some sense.

It's good to know we probably have until December to decide if we want to spend $69 to add an extra case and wireless charging capabilities to our AirPods!

September 9, 2017: AirPods getting a slightly new look

Thanks to some digging into the leaked supposed Gold Master (GM) version of iOS 11, developer Steve Troughton-Smith tweeted out some pictures of the second-generation AirPods. For the most part, they're exactly the same, but there is one notable change to the charging case: The LED status light is on the outside.

This change could make it easier for you to quickly assess whether you need to charge up your charging case before heading out, something I personally forget to do all of the time.

What do you want to see in the second-generation AirPods?

AirPods are the new hotness. Now that people — finally — have them in hand, many are loving them. Almost no one is calling them perfect, though. And what first-gen product really is? So, that leads to the big question: If Apple asked you what they should change for the next-generation AirPods, what would you tell them?

  • Ship more sooner! (Okay, yes, besides that!)
  • Black color option
  • (PRODUCT) RED color option.
  • Fashion options like Apple Watch bands.
  • USB-C instead of Lightning for charging.
  • BT tie-clip with manual controls for volume and skipping.
  • Swappable tips to fit a wider variety of ears.
  • Offline Siri, because you need to be able to command when— Zzzt ...
  • Proper Apple TV support
  • Find my AirPods feature.

Those are just a few of the suggestions I've seen so far. What are yours?

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From Steve Jobs to Apple Watch Series 3: Apple’s 2017 September Event

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Apple's new Park and new iPhone return the company to its roots.

Apple Park is breathtaking: Minimalist, austere, Zen. The main building curves through the campus and above the trees, a ring of glass and solar panels that disappears behind the rolling hills one moment only to rise up and fill your field of view the next.

The orchards are still growing in but it's easy to see they, and the paths that meandering around and in between, will be a welcome home to fruit, birds, and runners. No sign of a vineyard, though. At least not yet.

We entered through the Visitor Center, which includes an Apple Store and a Caffe. Both follow the company's latest design language — the one found at the newly updated Apple at Infinite Loop store. The scale is similar too, smaller and more intimate than Union Square or World Trade, but with the same earthy, almost communal vibe.

Up from the Visitor Center is what we came for: the Steve Jobs Theater. Much like the old 5th Avenue cube, the glass structure above ground is stunning but serves only as a cap for the much larger, more action-packed interior below.

We didn't get to try the rotating elevator; it was the stairs for us. After a quick climb down, we landed in the theater proper. Bigger than Town Hall at Infinite Loop but just as cozy, and brimmed with comfortable leather chairs that offered AC power at the base of every armrest and not-a-bad-seat-in-the-house views of center-stage.

And what a stage. Big, bright, and backed with the type of screen experience, we'd come to find out, you only find in the highest-end cinemas. (But better calibrated.)

It wasn't the biggest venue the company had ever used. It wasn't as cavernous as Flynt Center or Bill Graham Civic Auditorium. But it was the most Apple venue ever, the most modern, and one specifically built for what happened next.

Welcome to the Steve Jobs Theater

Apple's 2017 September Event began with a tribute to Apple's co-founder, and the man whose name the theater honors: Steve Jobs. His words filled the room: "One of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something great."

"I love hearing his voice," said Apple's CEO, Tim Cook. "It was only fitting that Steve should open his theater."

It was a visibly transformative moment for Apple and for Cook. "It's taken some time, but we can now reflect on him with joy instead of sadness."

For a decade, Cook said, Jobs had been working on a new campus for Apple that would enhance collaboration between engineers and designers as they created the next generation of products to change the world.

This was the defining moment of the show for me. More than any new watch or phone, Apple itself is what the company sees as its most important asset, and Apple Park is its new home.

A sea of asphalt converted into an orchard scattered with buildings powered by 100% renewable energy and thousands of dedicated hearts and souls.

"Steve's vision and passion live on here at Apple Park and everywhere at Apple. Today and every day, we honor him."

Apple Retail

Angela Ahrendts, senior vice president of Apple retail, kicked off the event with an update on Apple's new stores, which she said the company thinks of more as town halls. The last time I heard Ahrendts speak in front of media, at the Union Square opening, she confessed that, like Jony Ive, it wasn't her favorite thing. But Apple Park in many ways is an extension of what Apple Retail has been doing for the last few years, from design to spirit, and that's what she spoke to.

Ahrendts spoke about the latest and next Apple Stores, and about the new position therein: Creative Pros who are to the liberal arts what Geniuses have been to the technology.

She said the company sees Apple Stores more as educational opportunities, exemplified by the new Today at Apple programs and Forum facilities. At the end of the day, Apple still needs to sell. But the company is, I think smartly, playing the long game here and investing in customers and potential customers up front. No single sale is as valuable as a long term — perhaps lifelong — relationship.

"Apple Retail's purpose is to enrich lives. Thanks to the 65,000 Apple Retail Employees around the world!"

Apple Watch Series 3

Jeff Williams, who in addition to running Apple's operations also runs Watch and the company's health initiatives, was next up on stage. Apple still declines to release actual sales numbers for Apple Watch, but Williams said they were up 50% year-over-year — enough to make Apple Watch the number one watch in the world, over Rolex, Fossil, Omega, and Cartier.

While it's increasingly clear the smart watch market is predominantly an Apple Watch market, it's just as clear Apple doesn't view Watch in so narrow a context. The company is owning the wrist but it's unlocking the potential of wearable computing that remains its goal.

To that end, Willaims introduced one of the best event videos Apple has done: Apple Watch customers, from Russian cyborgs to blind runners to Olympians to accident victims, of all ages, from all different places and backgrounds, all saying in their own words how Watch liberated, improved, and even saved their lives.

Apple, like many, struggled at first to understand the place and purpose of Watch. No longer.

After highlighting some of the watchOS 4 features we saw back in June at WWDC, Williams showed off new functionality for the Watch's heart rate monitor. There's a redesigned app and complication, and alerts for elevated and irregular heartbeats. Williams also announced a new program with Stanford Medical that will offer heart monitoring to people at risk.

Where, before, the heart rate monitor detected serious health issues only incidentally, now it's being deliberately designed to do just that.

Next, Williams announced Apple Watch Series 3. On the surface, the big deal is cellular networking. That takes Apple Watch from a short-range shuttle craft that could never wander too far from starship iPhone to a warp-capable craft in its own right. Still limited by size and power, but no longer limited by space.

Apple was able to cram cellular into the existing Watch form factor — increased only ever-so-slightly at the bottom of the heart rate monitor's crystal enclosure, by effectively turning the display into the antenna array. By using LTE as cleverly as it had used GPS last year — only when iPhone wasn't available and as efficiently as possible when absolutely needed — Apple also maintained battery life for casual use.

Williams then placed a call to Deidre Caldbeck from the Watch's marketing team who, it was soon revealed, was out on a paddle board in the middle of the lake. That was a risky move for a live event but it made for a spectacular demo.

"I'm going rogue," said Williams, who then pointed out that while he enjoyed the benefit of dual microphones designed to give him phenomenal audio on the theater, all Caldbeck had was the tiny watch mic, far from her mouth, in the middle of the lake, and the call was coming through loud and clear.

Beneath the surface of Series 3 is something just as impressive: the new S3 system-in-package. Using Watch Series 3 later in the demo room, it felt like an even bigger performance jump than S2 was over S1 last year. It took Siri from its previous sluggish state to spritely and now enables Siri to talk back as well. That's huge for accessibility and for everyday use.

Much like cellular, the performance improvement is another huge step towards taking Apple Watch from accessory to computing device in its own right. It still can't be a primary device but it can now have moments of primacy. That's huge for now but even more important for what's coming next: A world overlayed by AirPod and other AR devices that only need a small local identity and cloud connected anchor to our bodies.

Not every carrier will support Watch Series 3, and not right away. My own carrier, Rogers, has no current plans. So I'll be switching carriers. For those who don't want or need cellular, there's also a Wi-Fi-only version of Series 3, along with Series 1 models to better cover introductory price points.

And yes, bands remain compatible, so I wasn't left weeping on the theater floor. There are also new Hermès and Nike+ versions, and new gray ceramic Edition, so my wallet is very much still there weeping. (Though partially in joy.)

To be continued...

Apple also introduced a new Apple TV and new iPhones. I'll share my thoughts on those in the next column.

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Should you buy the 38mm or 42mm Apple Watch?

Posted on September 13, 2017 by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Should you buy the small 38mm or large 42mm Apple Watch? Here's how to choose!

Apple provides two sizing options for the Apple Watch: 38mm and 42mm. Whether you're getting aluminum, steel, or ceramic, Series 1 or Series 3, Nike+ or Hermès — all Apple Watch models come in those two sizes. Some might find picking their size easy to do, whether that's based on wrist size, gender, style, or some other factor.

If you're struggling with picking the size that's right for you, however, here are some things to consider!

Height vs. width

Unlike traditional watches, which measure case size horizontally, Apple measures the Apple Watch vertically. The smaller of the two watch sizes has a height of 38mm (specifically, 38.6mm); the larger, 42mm. When it comes to width, the smaller Apple Watch is 33.3mm wide; the larger, 35.9mm.

These differences might not sound like very much — 3-4mm here or there — but 4mm out of 40mm is one tenth of the Apple Watch's dimensions.

The rounded rectangular shape of the Apple Watch makes it hard to compare directly with your average round watch, but in the traditional watch world, neither of the Apple Watches would be considered overly wide or high. Big watches are typically closer to 45mm.

Even if you think you want to go small, you can still consider both sizes — neither is enormous — though those with smaller wrists may find the 38mm fits more comfortably on the wrist.

Display size

The watch's different case sizes also translate to different display sizes. Both are Retina-quality, which means the pixels are invisible to the naked eye at normal viewing distance. The bigger Apple Watch simply has more of those pixels:

  • The 38mm Apple Watch has a display size of 340x272 pixels
  • The 42mm Apple Watch has a display size of 390x312 pixels

watchOS will fill whatever size display you choose, and for many people, it won't make any difference; that said, if you want more pixels, which translates into bigger text and images, it's worth considering.

Depth perception

Unlike the Watch's two height options and two display densities, there's no difference when it comes to the thickness (or thinness) of the two sizes.

That's because, unlike traditional mechanical or digital watches, the Apple Watch case has to hold a Retina display, the system-in-a-package (chipset), battery, and sensors. If you're trying to figure out which Apple Watch will best fit under the tight cuffs of your shirt, they're both about the same.

Hers and his

Because there are two sizes, and because some of Apple's bands are unique to one size or another, some have tried to simplify the size discussion down to "hers" and "his."

People come in all shapes and sizes, though, and so do tastes. Some women will want the bigger Apple Watch, and some men, the smaller. Some people with small wrists will want the bigger watch, and vice versa.

All this to say — get the size you prefer. Try both on, and see which one better fits your wrist, style, and personality. That's why Apple has sizes, after all, and why both sizes come with identical features.

Band bias

Since Apple only offers some bands in some sizes, if you have your heart set on a certain band, you may have to be willing to go with the size that matches it. That said, you can get 3rd-party knockoffs for everything in every size and then some, so it only really matters if you want the real thing.

38mm-specific bands:

  • Modern Buckle
  • Hermès Double Tour

42mm-specific bands

  • Leather Loop
  • Hermès Single Tour (certain colors)
  • Single Tour Rallye
  • Hermès Single Tour Deployment Buckle

Price points

The 38mm Apple Watch is slightly less expensive than the 42mm Apple Watch. As such, if you want to save some money, you can do so by going for the smaller size.

38mm Apple Watch

  • Apple Watch Series 1: $249
  • Apple Watch Series 3 GPS-only: $329
  • Apple Watch Series 3 GPS + Cellular: Starts at $399

42mm Apple Watch

  • Apple Watch Series 1: $279
  • Apple Watch Series 3 GPS-only: $359
  • Apple Watch Series 3 GPS + Cellular: Starts at $429

Battery life

The 42mm Apple Watch has a slightly bigger battery than the 38mm watch due to more room in the casing, and the Series 3 has a slightly bigger battery (same as the Series 2) than the Series 1.

If battery life is important to you — for example, you want to get in multiple workouts a day or you want to go a couple days without charging — you'll not only want to go with Series 2, but with the 42mm.

Who should get the 38mm Apple Watch?

If you have a small wrist and want the Apple Watch to look comfortable on it, if you have a large wrist and want the Apple Watch to look small, or if you just like smaller watches in general, you should get the 38mm Apple Watch.

See at Apple


Who should get the 42mm Apple Watch?

If you have a small wrist and want the Apple Watch to look big, if you have a large wrist and you want the Apple Watch to look as big as possible, if you have vision requirements that benefit from bigger graphics, you want a longer-lasting battery, or if you like bigger watches in general, you should get the 42mm Apple Watch.

See at Apple


Update September 2017: Updated for Apple Watch Series 3.

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Should you buy the aluminum, stainless steel, or ceramic Apple Watch?

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

Should you get the aluminum, stainless steel, or ceramic Apple Watch? Here's how to pick!

Apple Watch Series 1 and Apple Watch Series 3 come in your choice of three different materials with distinct properties and price points all their own. The Series 1 and 3 both come in anodized aluminum — the same material Apple uses for iPhone, iPad, and Mac. On the higher-end, Series 3 offers stainless steel, which is heavier but stronger and a favorite of many watch-wearers, along with white and grey ceramic, a more scratch-proof — and expensive — option than steel. So, which should you choose?

Price points

The different Apple Watch materials all come with different price points, depending on which model you want.

What's the difference between Apple Watch Series 0, Series 1, Series 2, and Series 3?

Apple Watch Series 3 Cellular vs GPS-only: What's the difference?

  • Aluminum starts at $249 for 38mm Series 1 ($329 for GPS-only, $399 for GPS + Cellular)
  • Stainless steel starts at $599
  • Ceramic starts at $1299

If price is your most important consideration, aluminum is your best option.

Heavy materials

Aluminum weight:

  • 38mm: 25g (Series 1), 26.7g (GPS-only), 28.7g (GPS + Cellular)
  • 42mm: 30g (Series 1), 32.3g (GPS-only), 34.9g (GPS + Cellular)

Stainless steel weights:

  • 38mm: 42.4g
  • 42mm: 52.8g

Ceramic weights:

  • 38mm: 40.1g
  • 42mm: 46.4g

If you want the lightest Apple Watch possible, you want the aluminum Apple Watch.

Scratch and damage resistance

Unfortunately, with great lightness does not come great hardness. Here's how the different materials hold up to damage.

  • The aluminum Apple Watch is the "softest" and the anodization could scratch or chip
  • The stainless steel Apple Watch is much, much harder, especially the black model with diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating
  • The ceramic Apple Watch is even harder than steel but is potentially easier to shatter if dropped onto a hard surface

If resistance to damage is the absolute most important thing to you, the stainless steel watch in general — and the space black version in particular — offer the best combination of scratch-and-shatter resistance.

Color matches

Apple Watch comes in a variety of colors, depending on the material:

  • Silver aluminum
  • Space gray aluminum
  • Gold aluminum
  • Polished stainless steel
  • Space black stainless steel
  • White ceramic
  • Grey ceramic

When you buy additional bands, though, the lugs won't always match the case.

  • Sport, Woven Nylon, and Sport Loop bands have colored lugs
  • Leather buckles and loops have polished stainless steel lugs
  • The stainless steel link bracelet and Milanese loop have polished stainless steel lugs
  • The space gray steel link bracelet and milanese loop have space black lugs
  • The ceramic Sport band has ceramic lugs

If matching the lugs to the case is important to you, stainless steel offers the widest possible compatibility; alternatively, you can learn how to switch up the lugs yourself.

How to use your favorite regular watch band with Apple Watch

How to replace the lugs on your Apple Watch bands

Who should get the aluminum Apple Watch?

If you're...

  • into physical fitness and you want the lightest Apple Watch you can get
  • going to be rough enough with it — or likely to lose it — and want the most affordable replacement option possible
  • not sure about Apple Watch and want to try it out at the lowest cost-of-entry
  • simply loving the way the bead-blasted aluminum gold option looks

You should get the aluminum Apple Watch.

See at Apple


Who should get the stainless steel Apple Watch?

If you...

  • love watches and want something heavy but not too heavy
  • want something classic on the outside but ultra-modern within
  • need a watch made out of strong materials like stainless steel and sapphire crystal
  • want the widest range of matching bands possible
  • need a watch but aren't precious about your metals

The stainless steel is for you.

See at Apple


Who should get the ceramic Apple Watch?

If...

  • money is no object
  • you're into ceramic watches in general
  • you want the most scratch-resistant surface possible
  • iPod-white or dark grey is your jam
  • you simply want something that stands out in a crowd

You want the white or grey ceramic Apple Watch.

See at Apple


Your Apple Watch pick?

If you're still not sure which Apple Watch you should get, check out our Apple Watch help and discussion forums. Otherwise, let me know which material you're choosing and, once you have it, what you think of it!

Updated September 2017: Updated to reflect options for Apple Watch Series 3.

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What iPhone and Apple Watch water-resistance ratings really mean

Posted on by Rene Ritchie.
Categories: Uncategorized.

How water resistant are Apple's latest iPhone and Apple Watch, and what do those ratings really mean?

iPhone X and iPhone 8 and 8 Plus ship with official water resistance, thanks to a variety of gaskets, seals, and changes to the design intended to help it survive splashes and dunks. Apple Watch Series 2 and the newer Apple Watch Series 3 take that level of protection a step further, adding clever water expulsion, to allow it to survive regular submersion of swimmers. But what does all that mean?

Here's what Apple has to say about iPhone X and iPhone 8 water resistance on apple.com:

[iPhone X], iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus are splash, water, and dust resistant and were tested under controlled laboratory conditions with a rating of IP67 under IEC standard 60529. Splash, water, and dust resistance are not permanent conditions and resistance might decrease as a result of normal wear. Do not attempt to charge a wet iPhone; refer to the user guide for cleaning and drying instructions. Liquid damage not covered under warranty.

And about Apple Watch Series 3, also on Apple.com:

Apple Watch Series 3 has a water resistance rating of 50 meters under ISO standard 22810:2010. This means that it may be used for shallow-water activities like swimming in a pool or ocean. However, Apple Watch Series 2 should not be used for scuba diving, waterskiing, or other activities involving high-velocity water or submersion below shallow depth.

The first is better defined than the second, with an IP67 rating clearly listed. The original Apple Watch was also IP67, and the new could be the same, or could be IP68. The lack of clarity lies in the standard — it doesn't define the requirements but leaves it to the vendor.

Jerry Hildenbrand has a cheat-sheet up on Android Central:

Protected against immersion in water up to one meter at normal pressure for 30 minutes.

And also points out:

[Having] an IP rating doesn't mean you can do anything you like with your phone. Phones aren't tested individually and they are mass produced. Your phone might fail if you take it into the pool, even if rated for water resistance. Having the IP rating does mean that the people who made it should be willing to stand behind it for any warranty issues.

In other words, the new iPhone is like the old Apple Watch. It'll survive brief, accidental contact with water, but don't think you can take it into the hot tub with you, and certainly not regularly.

In fact, iMore Managing Editor Serenity Caldwell has a tragic story of accidentally drowning her fiancé's iPhone and having to replace it. The lesson her story can provide is that, even if your iPhone can withstand being run under a faucet or even used in the shower, but it's not worth the risk to attempt a full submersion in any case.

Updated September 2017: Updated to address Apple's latest iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X.

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